Thread: The Damn I'm Old Thread - Putting Up With Being a Geezer

  1. #301
    Geriatric Anomaly progeezer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Toad View Post
    55 here. Son of a bitch, it'll be 56 next week. Heart ailments for me. Afib. I take a lot of pills each day and they seem to be working because the procedures failed but did not fail in killing my savings.
    Can't eat greens because of blood thinner meds, stay away from meat as much as possible (have a buffalo burger on NFL Sunday) but I drink too much and that's the problem.
    I went and saw my brother last week and he has got to be closing in on 500 lbs. No shit. I starting in on him when he was asking his wife if he could have some "Butter-Dipped Biscuits". He called me a Food-Nazi (that makes no sense) but I am in fear he's going to drop dead in his tracks. I think I should turn the secret weapon on him - his wife. Might not be easy though but she did agree with me about biscuit thing.

    Thanks for letting me vent.
    Toad - I've had the same blood thinner/Vitamin K problem you do since 1989 when I had surgery, and I love salads. I give myself 2 big salads a month and then take half an extra pill that day & I'm usually ok with my INR.

    I would be concerned too if that was my brother.
    "My choice early in life was either to be a piano player in a whorehouse or a politician, and to tell the truth, there's hardly any difference"

    President Harry S. Truman

  2. #302
    Member BobM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Toad View Post
    55 here. Son of a bitch, it'll be 56 next week. Heart ailments for me. Afib. I take a lot of pills each day and they seem to be working because the procedures failed but did not fail in killing my savings.
    Can't eat greens because of blood thinner meds, stay away from meat as much as possible (have a buffalo burger on NFL Sunday) but I drink too much and that's the problem.
    I went and saw my brother last week and he has got to be closing in on 500 lbs. No shit. I starting in on him when he was asking his wife if he could have some "Butter-Dipped Biscuits". He called me a Food-Nazi (that makes no sense) but I am in fear he's going to drop dead in his tracks. I think I should turn the secret weapon on him - his wife. Might not be easy though but she did agree with me about biscuit thing.

    Thanks for letting me vent.
    I began having AFIB problems about 8 years ago. Stopped drinking all caffeine and it is manageable. It only flares up when I eat too much chocolate, or drink too much. Regular exercise also helps a lot. I take a low dose beta blocker, one in the morning and one at dinner and that seems to do the trick, plus an aspirin at bedtime. No extra blood thinners for me, those are scary bad.

    Here's a tip, but please don't do this unless you are in good cardio shape, meaning you go to the gym regularly. When I get an AFIB I take an extra beta blocker, eat some protein, then an hour later I go to the gym and get on the treadmill or stair stepper. Sure, it is tough, but 15 minutes working through that and when my heart comes down to a regular rhythm again about 15-30 minutes later the AFIB is gone. Again, I am a regular gym goer, you could try it by walking the steps in your house, up and down to get your blood pumping, but you should definitely get into some decent cardio shape first. And get rid of all caffeine and extra sugars and cut back on the alcohol.
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  3. #303
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Woaw, don't come often enough to the WOT forum (page 13, WTF)...

    53, some would say I look like 43 (longhair & jeans and not owning a suit & tie, helping), but often wishing I was 63, for musical reasons (14 in 67 is way better than 14 in 77), but I would be that much closer to retirement

    Of course, I'm an old grumpie (to quote Sonia/Kati) and a curmudgeon to top it off, and when I see the young generations, I don't feel like saving the planet for them

    Overweight, and feeling old on some days, knowing that one day, I will have to pay for all the excesses I did in life (burned my candle from both ends), but I manage to stay young by groping "sweet young thangs" (well in their 30's mostly), though I refuse to make a dancing fool of myself by going techno.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  4. #304
    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    I refuse to make a dancing fool of myself by going techno.
    Like this?

  5. #305
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    ^^^
    Loved that tune (hated disco at the time), and that's why I referred to it...

    However, if I had to dance all night with a 20-sumthin', I'd do it over disco music (or Tango) rather than at rave parties filled with ecstasy-filled technoheads.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  6. #306
    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    ^^^
    Loved that tune (hated disco at the time), and that's why I referred to it...

    However, if I had to dance all night with a 20-sumthin', I'd do it over disco music (or Tango) rather than at rave parties filled with ecstasy-filled technoheads.
    I thought it would fit.

  7. #307
    Member rickawakeman's Avatar
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    Guys
    Hospitalized day after brand x in Arlington
    Stoma surgery
    Still in hospital 100 miles from home healing thoughts please
    Rick

  8. #308
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    Get well soon, Rick.

  9. #309
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Feel better
    Ian

    Gordon Haskell - "You've got to keep the groove in your head and play a load of bollocks instead"
    I blame Wynton, what was the question?
    There are only 10 types of people in the World, those who understand binary and those that don't.

  10. #310
    Geriatric Anomaly progeezer's Avatar
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    Sorry to hear that, Rick!

    (Can't resist) "You should live and be (get) well (soon)"

    To all of those previously discussing a while back whether to endure rather than enjoy continuing to work primarily to not take a hit from SS for early retirement, before you make any decisions about what to do, the first thing to do is math.

    E.G. If you're younger than age 62 (the earliest age at which you can apply for reduced SS benefits), contact the SS Admnistration and ask for a projection based on their current information on what you would receive at age 62 and what you would receive at your normal SS retirement age (66 for me, but older depending on the year you were born subsequent to 1945). They will send it to you in a few weeks once you request it.

    Subtract the age 62 mo. amount provided from the unreduced mo. amount provided at age 66,67 or whenever. If the amount is $1200 at age 62 and $1600 at age 66, for instance, the difference is $400/mo.

    If you began SS at age 62 you would receive 48 payments of $1200 before age 62, for a total of $57,600. Since we know that the difference is $400/mo. by waiting (potential cost-of-living adjustments notwithstanding), by dividing the $57,600 by $400 we have 144 mos, or 12 years.

    This means that in order to be mathematically ahead by waiting, in my example scenario, one would have to live at least 12 years after age 66, or to age 78.

    It's a life-expectancy crapshoot, based on your own knowledge of your (& your family's) health history.

    I used to get paid big bucks for spewing out shit like this.

    Seriously, do the math!
    Last edited by progeezer; 11-07-2016 at 11:01 PM.
    "My choice early in life was either to be a piano player in a whorehouse or a politician, and to tell the truth, there's hardly any difference"

    President Harry S. Truman

  11. #311
    Quote Originally Posted by rickawakeman View Post
    Guys
    Hospitalized day after brand x in Arlington
    Stoma surgery
    Still in hospital 100 miles from home healing thoughts please
    Rick
    How could I resist someone with Rick Wakeman in his name. Hope you will get well and home soon.

  12. #312
    Member Firth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by progeezer View Post
    Sorry to hear that, Rick!

    (Can't resist) "You should live and be (get) well (soon)"

    To all of those previously discussing a while back whether to endure rather than enjoy continuing to work primarily to not take a hit from SS for early retirement, before you make any decisions about what to do, the first thing to do is math.

    E.G. If you're younger than age 62 (the earliest age at which you can apply for reduced SS benefits), contact the SS Admnistration and ask for a projection based on their current information on what you would receive at age 62 and what you would receive at your normal SS retirement age (66 for me, but older depending on the year you were born subsequent to 1945). They will send it to you in a few weeks once you request it.

    Subtract the age 62 mo. amount provided from the unreduced mo. amount provided at age 66,67 or whenever. If the amount is $1200 at age 62 and $1600 at age 66, for instance, the difference is $400/mo.

    If you began SS at age 62 you would receive 48 payments of $1200 before age 62, for a total of $57,600. Since we know that the difference is $400/mo. by waiting (potential cost-of-living adjustments notwithstanding), by dividing the $57,600 by $400 we have 144 mos, or 12 years.

    This means that in order to be mathematically ahead by waiting, in my example scenario, one would have to live at least 12 years after age 66, or to age 78.

    It's a life-expectancy crapshoot, based on your own knowledge of your (& your family's) health history.

    I used to get paid big bucks for spewing out shit like this.

    Seriously, do the math!
    The actual math is more complex and is what SS has done relative to a life expectancy in the 80s. Retiring early reduces monthly payments for your entire life, however the accumulated amount is nearly equivalent since SS is COLA adjusted. In addition if you don't need to spend SS, or SS is used to pay off debt, there is a gain over and above what has been mentioned.

    Pre 65 retirement has other major hits:
    1. Medical Insurance
    2. Pension
    On the verge of indecision
    I'll always take the roundabout way

  13. #313
    Member BobM's Avatar
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    Geezer and Firth - right on. The media keeps pumping out propoganda that you should wait as long as possible before collecting Social Security. The truth is ... each person;s scenario is different.

    Sure, your benefit grows 8% a year between 62 and 67 or as far as 70. That's a great return. But the truth is, if you aren't around to collect it then you lose it. It doesn't get paid out to your heirs.

    The "break even" age between collecting at 62 or 67 is about 81 or 82, for me at least. Living to 82 is a pretty good, ripe old age. Many of us/you won't make it that far, based on what I'm reading in this thread. In that case it might make sense to collect early instead of waiting.

    There are many other options, especially if you are married. For instance you could collect your spousal distribution (have of your spouses SS) while letting yours grow.

    There are more if you are disabled and can qualify for Social Security disability (hint: you don;t have to wait until 62, you can collect early).

    You should meet with a Social Security representative to see what options make sense for you. Meet with two or three even, because they each might have a different opinion on how best to max out your distribution.

    And forget about the cost of living increase each year, it is almost nothing, though inflation could change that going forward.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A gentleman is defined as someone who knows how to play the accordion, and doesn't.

  14. #314
    Quote Originally Posted by progeezer View Post
    Sorry to hear that, Rick!

    (Can't resist) "You should live and be (get) well (soon)"

    To all of those previously discussing a while back whether to endure rather than enjoy continuing to work primarily to not take a hit from SS for early retirement, before you make any decisions about what to do, the first thing to do is math.

    E.G. If you're younger than age 62 (the earliest age at which you can apply for reduced SS benefits), contact the SS Admnistration and ask for a projection based on their current information on what you would receive at age 62 and what you would receive at your normal SS retirement age (66 for me, but older depending on the year you were born subsequent to 1945). They will send it to you in a few weeks once you request it.

    Subtract the age 62 mo. amount provided from the unreduced mo. amount provided at age 66,67 or whenever. If the amount is $1200 at age 62 and $1600 at age 66, for instance, the difference is $400/mo.

    If you began SS at age 62 you would receive 48 payments of $1200 before age 62, for a total of $57,600. Since we know that the difference is $400/mo. by waiting (potential cost-of-living adjustments notwithstanding), by dividing the $57,600 by $400 we have 144 mos, or 12 years.

    This means that in order to be mathematically ahead by waiting, in my example scenario, one would have to live at least 12 years after age 66, or to age 78.

    It's a life-expectancy crapshoot, based on your own knowledge of your (& your family's) health history.

    I used to get paid big bucks for spewing out shit like this.

    Seriously, do the math!



    Couldn't agree more. Do the math. For some, starting to collect early makes a lot of sense.

    In my (our) case, the Wife just retired at 64 and started collecting immediately (I'm 58 and plan on stopping working @ 59.5) Yes, I will have to cover my own health insurance but we have saved a TON of $$$ and can cover our expenses until I'm 66yrs/8 months when I will begin collecting at full retirement age......(It pays to not have kids)

    Btw: Rick, hope you get well soon and back home. Hope you enjoyed Brand X.
    G.A.S -aholic

  15. #315
    Best wishes on a speedy recovery Rick, it can't be pleasant bring so far from home at a time like this.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  16. #316
    Member Gizmotron's Avatar
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    Indeed!
    Feel better soon!

  17. #317
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    Has Obamacare been an improvement for anybody here?

  18. #318
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeuhlmate View Post
    Has Obamacare been an improvement for anybody here?
    It got my daughter off my health plan
    Ian

    Gordon Haskell - "You've got to keep the groove in your head and play a load of bollocks instead"
    I blame Wynton, what was the question?
    There are only 10 types of people in the World, those who understand binary and those that don't.

  19. #319
    Don't let your meatloaf! Paulie's Avatar
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    If you call a substantial medical deduction increase, along with increased co-pay and deductables, then yes, there has been a marked improvement.
    "That gum you like is going to come back in style."

  20. #320
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    It saved my brother $700 / month on his family plan.

  21. #321
    Geriatric Anomaly progeezer's Avatar
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    There are (now more than) 8 million stories in the Naked City.
    "My choice early in life was either to be a piano player in a whorehouse or a politician, and to tell the truth, there's hardly any difference"

    President Harry S. Truman

  22. #322
    Moderator Duncan Glenday's Avatar
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    My son-in-law was out for work for a short while. He and my daughter tried all of the plans on the local ACA exchange (aka "Obamacare").

    They were prohibitively expensive, and despite being unemployed, the system offered them a subsidy of (wait for it) $17.

    They shopped around at plans offering healthcare directly to the public (i.e. "individual" plans, for people without employer-based insurance).

    Much cheaper, with better coverage.

    Interesting...



    Take that 1 step further:

    I am a management consultant specializing in the payer-side of healthcare (i.e. health insurers etc.), and my specialty is assisting organizations to become fully compliant with Federal and local mandates.

    I have now consulted to two health plans (one smallish, one very large) that basically re-structured their entire organization around the ACA and the exchanges etc. It cost them a huge amount, in both $$ and in organizational upheaval, to re-invent themselves into the kind of organization that the "Obamacare" philosophy has called for from the outset.

    Both health plans started running at a significant loss the moment they switched on their new ACA-friendly personna.

    After two years:
    - One of them (the bigger, Blue Cross / Blue Shield organization) is still trying.
    - The smaller plan has dumped the ACA and disengaged themselves from the exchange. It was that, or go out of business.

    Interesting...
    Regards,

    Duncan

  23. #323
    Member BobM's Avatar
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    I know many doctors that have refused to accept exchange plans. In 2017 our plan has reduced the number of doctors in their network, citing major losses.

    I retired at the end of 2015 and am looking into plans for next year. My income level is going to be much lower in 2017, so we should be able to apply for a subsidy. That's the good news. the bad is that I may have to change plans or find new doctors that will accept them, and the co-pays and deductibles have almost doubled. Slim pickings I'm afraid and, though the up front cost should be lower next year, the choices are severely limited.

    I just know that something is going to come back and bite me, like excessive paperwork and denied claims and such.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A gentleman is defined as someone who knows how to play the accordion, and doesn't.

  24. #324
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    I find it 'interesting' what your new president will do (on all subjects).
    He said once that he would roll back Obamacare.
    He said many things, perhaps its not 'rollbackable'.

  25. #325
    Member Lopez's Avatar
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    Hope you are at least comfortable, Rick, and that you get back on your feet again soon.
    Lou

    Awarded the Krusty Brand Seal of Approval. It's not just good, it's good enough.

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