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Thread: The 60's and 70's, what you liked and disliked

  1. #51
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    I liked Lost In Space, Andy Griffith, Beverly Hillbillies, Bewitched.....etc.

  2. #52
    I liked The Twilight Zone. I was living in the Vineland zone. Night Gallery and Dark Shadows were favorites. I saw Little Big Man and tried to relate that to my grandmother being of the Shawnee tribe, but became more and more distant and disinterested in my teens. The Beatles cartoon was cool and so was Gene London. I liked the Ed Sullivan Show mainly because of the innovative Jewish comedians and British Invasion bands. Bet Your Life ...Groucho Marx was funny and The Three Stooges. The Mike Douglas Show always had interesting guests and as a child I always got excited over seeing Buddy Rich doing a drum solo.

  3. #53
    Orange Tick Squasher Buddhabreath's Avatar
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    I've thought a lot about the 60's even though I came of age in the 70's. It was an amazing, angry decade full of potential, consciousness expansion and unfulfilled potentials. I always felt a bit like I missed the party.

    I probably shouldn't do this, but I wrote a song as a young man which I put to 4-track in an amateurish way in the early 80's (in an ill-equiped basement). It's at the start of a "merged" track (which later includes some goofy experiments like a "beer bottle quartet) that I rescued and digitized some time ago before any surviving tapes were toast. Anyway the song at the beginning expresses in a way my feelings of that time and I think is in line with the thread discussion. You can listen here: http://www71.zippyshare.com/v/T4ZBR4Bx/file.html
    The combined fortunes of the world's 26 richest individuals reached $1.4 trillion last year — the same amount as the total wealth of the 3.8 billion poorest people.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enid View Post
    There was a great music scene in Vineland N.J. during the 60's and 70's. The guitarists from Vineland and Millville N.J. were outstanding for their age and they were becoming diverse in different styles quickly. I discovered them at age 13 and I used to sneak out of my parents house and walk to Landis Ave where music was in the air. There was a building called "Stage One" and this fantastic guitarist named Steve Laury played there in the evenings. He seemed to be ahead of all the other guitarists in the area. The others were brilliant players particularly Steve Girardi and Rob Champion. By age 15 Steve Laury was my mentor and whenever he would turn up at my rehearsals ....I would hand him the guitar. He went on to become an internationally known Jazz artist. He was influenced by Wes Montgomery and he has a vid on Y.T. titled "Shut Up And Listen".....



    On Landis Ave....hippies would stand on street corners in groups. I remember being heavily into Mike Bloomfield and everyone I approached seemed to know everything about him. They knew he had played with The Paul Butterfield Blues Band ....They knew about Super Session. He was very popular amongst the hippie culture . I believe between '71 and '72 the guy who had been the original drummer for The Four Seasons...(yuk), had a very large venue on Delsea Drive in Vineland called "A Place In The Sun". The James Gang played there and several internationally known 60's and 70's bands until he simply closed one day and vanished himself.


    Steve Laury had an older brother Bob and ....Bob was good friends with Todd Rundgren during the period of his life when he played in "Woody's Truckstop" Bob and Todd used to cruise Landis Ave and sometimes they would both hang together in Philadelphia. At the Vineland High School were these great concerts with bands like "White Rabbit" and the music was forever expanding. Even though my exposure to this 60's music scene was a gift...I was too young to be accepted.


    By the time I hit the road it was all about Robin Trower.....Thin Lizzy...and Deep Purple...which I liked their music..but because of being spoiled by the 60's environment I felt cheated . I wanted to hear Peter Green again and people were more interested in "Stadium Rock" by then. And Glam Rock as well. All the drugs people were doing forced me into a very private life. I wanted to visit Tibet .
    Now you're talking the relevant stuff. Like reading this.
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  5. #55
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vic2012 View Post
    I liked Lost In Space, Andy Griffith, Beverly Hillbillies, Bewitched.....etc.
    Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea and My Favorite Martian.

  6. #56
    Oh No! Bass Solo! klothos's Avatar
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    the TV discussion reminded me of something I really liked about the 70s: There were some damn good low budget TV movies, especially the thrillers, horror, and suspense movies. I remember both NBC, CBS, and ABC all had a "____day-Night-At-The-Movies" (usually Fridays but all three would sporadically run them on weekdays). Low-budget and sub-par acting, of course, and the screenplays certainly could have been refined but the plots were very original ( just opposite of today where budgets are high but nobody seems to have an original idea anymore). Ones I remember were "Short Walk To Daylight", "Bad Ronald", "Trilogy of Terror", "Where Have All The People Gone", etc ( Cant believe I remembered the names of some of these) but there were a lot more.....and all the NBC Movies series (McCloud, Colombo. etc) were also good......There was also a little known series called "Ghost Story" (renamed "Circle Of Fear") that had some really awesome stories and featured a lot of folks who became name actors (Susan Dey, Martin Sheen)....I researched it awhile back and it turned out some of the writers for Star Trek, like D.C. Fontana, wrote some of the Circle of Fear screenplays

  7. #57
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    Born in '62. I remember the Moon Landing. And loving The Beatles.
    The moment that will be forever burnt into my memory: my older brother coming home from college with a copy of Yes Fragile in tow.
    Now it all made sense. The 70's were so beautiful to me. I had Yes. I had Genesis. King Crimson. Pink Floyd. ELP. Rundgren.
    And lots of cop shows: Mannix, Barnaby Jones, Cannon, Barreta, Harry O, Streets Of San Francisco, etc.
    Prog's Not Dead

  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by Buddhabreath View Post
    I've thought a lot about the 60's even though I came of age in the 70's. It was an amazing, angry decade full of potential, consciousness expansion and unfulfilled potentials. I always felt a bit like I missed the party.

    I probably shouldn't do this, but I wrote a song as a young man which I put to 4-track in an amateurish way in the early 80's (in an ill-equiped basement). It's at the start of a "merged" track (which later includes some goofy experiments like a "beer bottle quartet) that I rescued and digitized some time ago before any surviving tapes were toast. Anyway the song at the beginning expresses in a way my feelings of that time and I think is in line with the thread discussion. You can listen here: http://www71.zippyshare.com/v/T4ZBR4Bx/file.html
    Nice ideas! It is reminiscent of Syd Barrett and one of the more dark ballads of Jefferson Airplane. It also reminds me of the style of chords and singing on Jeremy Spencer and the Children Of God. Not sure if you've heard that album, but it has the essence of that. Good work.

  9. #59
    Boo! walt's Avatar
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    My older brother and i shared a bedroom.On school nights we'd try to watch Johnny Carson's monologue.If we could just watch his monologue we'd be happy and turn off the set and go to sleep.We had to play it quietly or our parents(in their next door bedroom) would come in and put the kibosh on it; we weren't supposed to be up, much less watch tv at 11:30pm.On occasion, when my brother was being a dick, he'd wheel the tv cart so i couldn't see it.Of course, this had it's disadvantages for him, one word from me to our parents and the jig was up.




    Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour
    Man From U.N.C.L.E
    The Name Of The Game
    Mannix
    Laugh-In
    Get Smart
    Combat..



    I'm old.
    Last edited by walt; 09-02-2016 at 11:50 AM.
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  10. #60
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by miamiscot View Post
    And lots of cop shows: Mannix, Barnaby Jones, Cannon, Barreta, Harry O, Streets Of San Francisco, etc.
    Barney Miller. Loved Wojo!

    And WKRP in Cincinnati -- loved Bailey!

    And The Mod Squad -- loved Julie!

  11. #61
    Columbo was mentioned....I was a huge fan .

  12. #62
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    I've been watching Barney Miller on one of the cheap, basic cable channels recently. It's a funny show but of the regular characters I really think are funny are Jack Soo, Inspector Luger, Fish, and Barney. Can't stand Ron Glass. Wojo? He's never been that funny (imo) but I always crack up when Barney yells at him .....WOJOOOO!!!!

  13. #63
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Jack Soo (Nick Yemana) and Abe Vigoda (Fish) were strong characterizations, but somewhat one dimensional. What I liked about Wojo is that he mostly kept quiet, and was unassuming, except when he was fired up about something. Suddenly he was passionate and intelligent and somebody you WANTED to listen to. A character of unexpected depth, in other words.

  14. #64
    Catch 22 was one of my favorite films.

  15. #65
    ALL ACCESS Gruno's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Jack Soo (Nick Yemana) and Abe Vigoda (Fish) were strong characterizations, but somewhat one dimensional. What I liked about Wojo is that he mostly kept quiet, and was unassuming, except when he was fired up about something. Suddenly he was passionate and intelligent and somebody you WANTED to listen to. A character of unexpected depth, in other words.
    Exactly! Wojo was THE man! I met him (Max Gail) many times through the years. He is in the music industry -- go figure! I see him at music conventions and at other functions in and around Los Angeles. When I first met him back in 1995, I told him, "I loved your character. You were the emotional one." He thanked me for noticing. He's such a great guy in real life. He does a lot of charity work, also.

    Hal Linden was another great guy to meet. Very humble and so down to earth!

    I love Barney Miller. The final scene from the 3-part finale is classic!

  16. #66
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    Favorite 60s toys: Rock 'Em Sock 'Em Robots, Operation, Mouse Trap, Tinker Toys, Monster Magnet, Superball, Frisbee, Wheelo..........

  17. #67
    Boo! walt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vic2012 View Post
    Rock 'Em Sock 'Em Robots, .

    by Marx.
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  18. #68
    In 1969 my sister asked my mother if she could take me to the Woodstock festival. I was 13 years old. My mother flipped and told my sister...."No way is that going to happen!" "I don't want him around drugs , nudity, and long haired freaks!" In the end my sister didn't attend the festival anyway because her husband was a "greaser" who disliked the whole hippie movement. Probably a year later my sister took me to the "Drive In" to see the Woodstock movie. I liked the movie and the particular scene of that film that always gave me chills was the audience response at the end of " Soul Sacrifice" After Santana end the piece the camera switches to the visual of the massive amount of people and within the clarity of the audio you can feel the roar of that audience and it's just wild and out of control. Then the camera switches back to the band and once again to the audience where the roar is even louder.



    In the mid 70's , record executives who had been working for the major record companies for decades were older guys from a entire different generation. Guys that appreciated Jazz and Classical and were more than willing to give bands like Yes the freedom to record 20 minute pieces . They trusted the artist to create and hardly got involved with their expertise of that area. Although these records executives had helped create a path FOR commercial "Top 40" hits, that was a separate world or business venture on its own and Progressive Rock and even mainstream Rock remained eclectic and artistic.



    Stories from Frank Zappa and later Frank Marino...revealed that people who were ex- revolutionaries ..hippies...were sought out by the older generation of record executives and it was suggested that they advice the record companies on what would sell. People from the hippie generation began taking over and forcing the idea of shortening songs and additionally leaving out solos. In the beginning of this change over...it was subtle and gradually taking its course until one day music began to suck. Zappa and Marino were two particular individuals that went public with this story and confirmed truth of its existence. Many other musicians who were well aware of the incident ....resented it but remained quiet as to not Rock the boat of their livelihood. In point....the ex-revolutionaries of the 60's had created an establishment of their own which was ten times worse than the one they rebelled against in 1969.

  19. #69
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enid View Post
    ...until one day music began to suck.
    With all due respect I think the story is a bit more complex than that. Money and drugs were involved.

    It wasn't pretty.

  20. #70
    Oh No! Bass Solo! klothos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enid View Post
    Stories from Frank Zappa and later Frank Marino...revealed that people who were ex- revolutionaries ..hippies...were sought out by the older generation of record executives and it was suggested that they advice the record companies on what would sell. People from the hippie generation began taking over and forcing the idea of shortening songs and additionally leaving out solos. In the beginning of this change over...it was subtle and gradually taking its course until one day music began to suck. Zappa and Marino were two particular individuals that went public with this story and confirmed truth of its existence. Many other musicians who were well aware of the incident ....resented it but remained quiet as to not Rock the boat of their livelihood. In point....the ex-revolutionaries of the 60's had created an establishment of their own which was ten times worse than the one they rebelled against in 1969.
    Nah...it lasted into the late 70s and it wasn't an abrupt halt but a gradient fade from about '75 onward...It was guys like Robert Stigwood that began "image hustling", adding the gltzy Vegas-shmaltz to acts (painting the Bee Gees gear all white and putting them in all white leotards, for example)......it was taking away the artistic element and concentrated more on packaging......It had no chance of ever reverting back because the (technologically natural) progression to music video was only years away, cemented, first by the UK, then by MTV and the like.

    But Zappa's point is definitely on target: this is where the "Robert Stigwood's" evolved from

    I know its been posted a thousand times but just for the heck of relevency:


  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enid View Post
    Stories from Frank Zappa and later Frank Marino...revealed that people who were ex- revolutionaries ..hippies...were sought out by the older generation of record executives and it was suggested that they advice the record companies on what would sell. People from the hippie generation began taking over and forcing the idea of shortening songs and additionally leaving out solos. In the beginning of this change over...it was subtle and gradually taking its course until one day music began to suck. Zappa and Marino were two particular individuals that went public with this story and confirmed truth of its existence. Many other musicians who were well aware of the incident ....resented it but remained quiet as to not Rock the boat of their livelihood. In point....the ex-revolutionaries of the 60's had created an establishment of their own which was ten times worse than the one they rebelled against in 1969.
    First I've ever heard that. Call me skeptical. Dubious, even.
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  22. #72
    Quote Originally Posted by klothos View Post
    Nah...it lasted into the late 70s and it wasn't an abrupt halt but a gradient fade from about '75 onward...It was guys like Robert Stigwood that began "image hustling", adding the gltzy Vegas-shmaltz to acts (painting the Bee Gees gear all white and putting them in all white leotards, for example)......it was taking away the artistic element and concentrated more on packaging......It had no chance of ever reverting back because the (technologically natural) progression to music video was only years away, cemented, first by the UK, then by MTV and the like.

    But Zappa's point is definitely on target: this is where the "Robert Stigwood's" evolved from

    I know its been posted a thousand times but just for the heck of relevency:


    Rock music became less interesting to play by then. Three chords instead of 6 or 8, solos were less, songs were shortened, and then there was Love Beach . Commercialized Stadium Rock compared to the British Blues ?? Really?? Van Halen in '79 compared to Deep Purple Machine Head era? You don't hear the cheapness in Van Halen 1979 when compared to Deep Purple in '72? You don't hear the difference? Bad Company instead of Free? Foghat instead of Savoy Brown? Rock music was way less adventurous by then...guitar solos were noisy and written mainly off three chords like..."Aint Talkin' About Love" . The songwriting in Bad Company was very good..but it was more restricted than the music of Free and also much more commercial. Edgar Winter sold out with "Free Ride" , UFO were not too bad, but for every decent band there were 6 or 7 more waiting in line to play cheap Stadium Rock. Did Stigwood ask Rock musicians to write stupid songs too? Blue Oyster Cult were good...but c'mon really?? Oreo Speedwagon? and less promotion for Humble Pie...who were ten times as talented? really? I know I didn't imagine all this. I remember it happening. I remember 2 people being talented in a Rock band instead of all four. I recall seeing more and more of it. More volume and much less going into the composition over time. Jo Jo Gunne compared to Spirit? Bands like Brownsville Station and Grand Funk Railroad compared to Juicy Lucy or early Fleetwood Mac? You don't hear the difference ?

  23. #73
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enid View Post
    In the mid 70's , record executives who had been working for the major record companies for decades were older guys from a entire different generation. Guys that appreciated Jazz and Classical and were more than willing to give bands like Yes the freedom to record 20 minute pieces . They trusted the artist to create and hardly got involved with their expertise of that area. Although these records executives had helped create a path FOR commercial "Top 40" hits, that was a separate world or business venture on its own and Progressive Rock and even mainstream Rock remained eclectic and artistic.

    Stories from Frank Zappa and later Frank Marino...revealed that people who were ex- revolutionaries ..hippies...were sought out by the older generation of record executives and it was suggested that they advice the record companies on what would sell. People from the hippie generation began taking over and forcing the idea of shortening songs and additionally leaving out solos. In the beginning of this change over...it was subtle and gradually taking its course until one day music began to suck. Zappa and Marino were two particular individuals that went public with this story and confirmed truth of its existence. Many other musicians who were well aware of the incident ....resented it but remained quiet as to not Rock the boat of their livelihood. In point....the ex-revolutionaries of the 60's had created an establishment of their own which was ten times worse than the one they rebelled against in 1969.

    Quote Originally Posted by Enid View Post
    Rock music became less interesting to play by then. Three chords instead of 6 or 8, solos were less, songs were shortened, and then there was Love Beach . Commercialized Stadium Rock compared to the British Blues ?? Really?? Van Halen in '79 compared to Deep Purple Machine Head era? You don't hear the cheapness in Van Halen 1979 when compared to Deep Purple in '72? You don't hear the difference? Bad Company instead of Free? Foghat instead of Savoy Brown? Rock music was way less adventurous by then...guitar solos were noisy and written mainly off three chords like..."Aint Talkin' About Love" . The songwriting in Bad Company was very good..but it was more restricted than the music of Free and also much more commercial. Edgar Winter sold out with "Free Ride" , UFO were not too bad, but for every decent band there were 6 or 7 more waiting in line to play cheap Stadium Rock. Did Stigwood ask Rock musicians to write stupid songs too? Blue Oyster Cult were good...but c'mon really?? Oreo Speedwagon? and less promotion for Humble Pie...who were ten times as talented? really? I know I didn't imagine all this. I remember it happening. I remember 2 people being talented in a Rock band instead of all four. I recall seeing more and more of it. More volume and much less going into the composition over time. Jo Jo Gunne compared to Spirit? Bands like Brownsville Station and Grand Funk Railroad compared to Juicy Lucy or early Fleetwood Mac? You don't hear the difference ?

    I can't help but also thinking that music started to suck from 75 onwards, though I was already mildly aware of that while living the seciond part of the 70's...

    As I said before, I started buying music in 74 (my first album was Crime Of The Century in sept of that year) at age 11, but already back then, I was more into buying pre-75 albums more than buying the new stuff... And in the second half of the 70's albums I bought, my choices were significantly harder rock (Rush, Rainbow, Priest, BÖC, Whitesnake, etc...) than what I bought from the early 70's. Of course I still bought later-70's Genesis, Yes, Floyd and stuff, but on the whole, it was harder and less prog (I also bought some mainstream and the odd punky stuff)

    And indeed, I also felt that the offshoots or reincarnations of some bands (as those you mentioned just above) were definitely lame to their former selves... And I was only 17 when the decade turned to the dreadful 80's...

    But I tend to think that beyond this story of hiring hippies (first time I hear of this story) to see what to release, it was the rationalisation of the industry , as the execs were taking back the controls, as the AOR transition, from Album Oriented Rock of the early 70's became rather rapidly Adult Oriented Radio became evident by 76-77 ... I mean, I could hear the difference between Montreal's CHOM-FM in 72 and Toronto's 73 CHUM-FM (whhen I first tuned in to airwaves) and 77 CHUM-FM or CILQ (Q-107) when "High School peer pressure" struck and whatever was hip became dominant in our student-life original soundtrack

    Not that I'm questionning Zappa's story about this issue, my guess is that if they (excecs) hired some "hippies", it's probably the frustrated ones that hadn't had much success (or lacked the talent to pierce) during that age and maybe changed their ideals and turned to more economical reasons (these prog masterpieces costed 70 times than a punk single to produce)... These dudes might have been the precursors of the 80's yuppies (which were also late 60's reconverted hippies, as well... Simply dudes that realised that the 67 to 72 ideals was a nice fantasy and had to move on and feed their family, so they started playing the game they tried to avoid some 10 years earlier...

    Let's face it, by the time I graduated HS in early 81 (yes, I had my diploma in January and worked for a while, then took off on a hippie traim for a three months >> but instead of Instabul-Kabul-Katmandu, I did Caracas-Lima-Tierre del Fuego), I was still mainly living by my "hippie" illusion (and still listening to late-60's & early 70's ... Byt the time of late 84, I was finished Uni and had to face real life (finding a job), but I had to turn to the 60's and started to delve into jazz via Caravanserai, Inner Mounting Flame, Bitches Brew, A Love Supreme, etc.... Indeed, I wanted no part in the 80's crud - little did I know that RIO was in full stride during that decade.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  24. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by Enid View Post
    Rock music became less interesting to play by then. [..] You don't hear the difference ?
    You could always look underground (RIO f.e.). Or in the french, german or other european scenes. And the punk/new wave explosion. At least I had that option by 1978... The 80s have been a very challenging era for very innovative discoveries. I personally first listened to Can or Etron Fou in the 70s and years later to Deep Purple's "Come Taste the Band" or Bad Co's "Straight Shooter".
    Last edited by spacefreak; 09-04-2016 at 08:59 AM.
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  25. #75
    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    I can't help but also thinking that music started to suck from 75 onwards, though I was already mildly aware of that while living the seciond part of the 70's...

    As I said before, I started buying music in 74 (my first album was Crime Of The Century in sept of that year) at age 11, but already back then, I was more into buying pre-75 albums more than buying the new stuff... And in the second half of the 70's albums I bought, my choices were significantly harder rock (Rush, Rainbow, Priest, BÖC, Whitesnake, etc...) than what I bought from the early 70's. Of course I still bought later-70's Genesis, Yes, Floyd and stuff, but on the whole, it was harder and less prog (I also bought some mainstream and the odd punky stuff)

    And indeed, I also felt that the offshoots or reincarnations of some bands (as those you mentioned just above) were definitely lame to their former selves... And I was only 17 when the decade turned to the dreadful 80's...

    But I tend to think that beyond this story of hiring hippies (first time I hear of this story) to see what to release, it was the rationalisation of the industry , as the execs were taking back the controls, as the AOR transition, from Album Oriented Rock of the early 70's became rather rapidly Adult Oriented Radio became evident by 76-77 ... I mean, I could hear the difference between Montreal's CHOM-FM in 72 and Toronto's 73 CHUM-FM (whhen I first tuned in to airwaves) and 77 CHUM-FM or CILQ (Q-107) when "High School peer pressure" struck and whatever was hip became dominant in our student-life original soundtrack

    Not that I'm questionning Zappa's story about this issue, my guess is that if they (excecs) hired some "hippies", it's probably the frustrated ones that hadn't had much success (or lacked the talent to pierce) during that age and maybe changed their ideals and turned to more economical reasons (these prog masterpieces costed 70 times than a punk single to produce)... These dudes might have been the precursors of the 80's yuppies (which were also late 60's reconverted hippies, as well... Simply dudes that realised that the 67 to 72 ideals was a nice fantasy and had to move on and feed their family, so they started playing the game they tried to avoid some 10 years earlier...

    Let's face it, by the time I graduated HS in early 81 (yes, I had my diploma in January and worked for a while, then took off on a hippie traim for a three months >> but instead of Instabul-Kabul-Katmandu, I did Caracas-Lima-Tierre del Fuego), I was still mainly living by my "hippie" illusion (and still listening to late-60's & early 70's ... Byt the time of late 84, I was finished Uni and had to face real life (finding a job), but I had to turn to the 60's and started to delve into jazz via Caravanserai, Inner Mounting Flame, Bitches Brew, A Love Supreme, etc.... Indeed, I wanted no part in the 80's crud - little did I know that RIO was in full stride during that decade.

    Crime Of The Century was a pretty good album. Good summary overall! Interesting story too. All I know is that when I hit the music scene in '76...I was being informed by all great musicians , ten years older than me...that hippies were now record executives and that Rock music was being contrived. At first I did not get it. People were like..."Don't you understand kid?? They cut their hair and they are wearing suits and ties..and they have made some bad decisions" It wasn't until years later that I heard Zappa and Marino confirm this incident. What was I to do? I had just entered the circuit to watch bands like Nektar and Renaissance get less and less attention . I was depressed about that scene ..but what could I do? I had to sell out or quit...otherwise I wouldn't have made any money to support myself. Fortunately some good things came out of it.

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