Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 146

Thread: Miles Davis. Miles Davis. Miles Davis.

  1. #26
    Member No Pride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Chicago, IL, USA
    Posts
    137
    Quote Originally Posted by wideopenears View Post
    I consider the Shorter/Hancock/Carter/Williams band to be the best small group Jazz that has ever existed.
    Well, them and the Coltrane Quartet! And to think both bands were tearing it up at around the same time period. The only reason I'd ever wish I was older than I am.

    I love Miles' first great quintet with Coltrane and Cannonball too! Funny, I started with In a Silent Way and Bitches Brew, which I loved when I was in my late teens/early 20s. As I got older, I grew to love the earlier stuff more.

    And btw, Miles DID box, though not professionally. He wasn't just posing for that photo.

  2. #27
    Banned Dave (in MA)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    42°09′30″N 71°08′43″W
    Posts
    3,180
    The tracks on the Jack Johnson box are mostly named after boxers, with the ones that came out of the archives untitled given their names by Vince Wilburn, Jr., Miles' nephew.

    "Willie Nelson" dates at least as far back as 1981, when a 1970 version of it was released on the "Directions" compilation. The boxer Willie Nelson wasn't born until 1987 and wasn't even active in boxing until after the box came out. So, was there an earlier boxer by that name, or is the piece named after everybody's favorite weed-smoking, tax-avoiding country singer? (Or maybe it's like Joe Frazier off the Bruford album that was named after some guy that Jeff Berlin knew.)

  3. #28
    Member Adrian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Seattle-ish
    Posts
    15
    I like his Silent Way-Bitches-Jack Johnson period well enough, along with a few other songs here and there, but for the most part he's never been my cup of tea. And I say that with full appreciation of his talent and creativity.

  4. #29
    This summer I've been listening to the early 60s material. Monterey 1963, Seven Steps To Heaven, Miles In Tokyo w/ Sam Rivers, and Miles In Berlin, an early live recording with the great quintet. It's all good, but the playing at the Monterey '63 concert is phenomenal!

  5. #30
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Philadelphia Area
    Posts
    1,232
    Quote Originally Posted by No Pride View Post

    And btw, Miles DID box, though not professionally. He wasn't just posing for that photo.
    Imagine that, a guy who earned a living with his hands boxing.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #31
    Member StevegSr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Brexit Empire
    Posts
    86
    Quote Originally Posted by No Pride View Post

    And btw, Miles DID box, though not professionally. He wasn't just posing for that photo.
    I never said he didn't, it was just a hobby for him.
    To be or not to be? That is the point. - Harry Nilsson.

  7. #32
    Moderator Poisoned Youth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Nothern Virginia, USA
    Posts
    2,185
    Quote Originally Posted by No Pride View Post
    Well, them and the Coltrane Quartet! And to think both bands were tearing it up at around the same time period. The only reason I'd ever wish I was older than I am.

    I love Miles' first great quintet with Coltrane and Cannonball too! Funny, I started with In a Silent Way and Bitches Brew, which I loved when I was in my late teens/early 20s. As I got older, I grew to love the earlier stuff more.

    And btw, Miles DID box, though not professionally. He wasn't just posing for that photo.

    Speaking strictly pre-70s, I think I have gotten more mileage from the Coltrane Quartet than the "2nd great Miles quintet", primarily because the Coltrane material not only stretches out more but sounds more fresh 50 years later when compared to the plethora of jazz bands out there since.

    Speaking of Cannonball, the "Something Else" date with Miles, while an obvious selection, is just incredible almost 60 years later.

    Ultimately it ends up being Silent Way and Brew that I return to the most with Miles. I usually tend to spin 60s Hancock, Shorter, and Williams recordings more than the actual quintet by a wide margin.
    WANTED: Sig-worthy quote.

  8. #33
    Boo! walt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Oakland Gardens NY
    Posts
    4,512
    I keep coming back to Porgy and Bess.So much heavy emotion and feeling that these tracks convey(to me).There are some ensemble passages that aren't note perfect, but these are minor quibbles.A monumental album, imo.Two tracks in particular.



    "please do not understand me too quickly"-andre gide

  9. #34
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Serbia
    Posts
    1,882
    My favourite Miles' albums are In A Silent Way, On The Corner and Decoy





    And I think that On The Corner and Decoy are slightly underrrated.

  10. #35
    Member StevegSr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Brexit Empire
    Posts
    86
    Quote Originally Posted by Poisoned Youth View Post
    Speaking strictly pre-70s, I think I have gotten more mileage from the Coltrane Quartet than the "2nd great Miles quintet", primarily because the Coltrane material not only stretches out more but sounds more fresh 50 years later when compared to the plethora of jazz bands out there since.
    I agree as JCQ does still sound fresh and there's more to sink your teeth into then what's offered from the "2nd great Mile Q."
    To be or not to be? That is the point. - Harry Nilsson.

  11. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave (in MA) View Post
    The Live in Tokyo '75 release was talked about here:
    http://forums.stevehoffman.tv/thread...-label.494843/
    Interesting. I'd say they're right on all counts.

    Quote Originally Posted by Enid View Post
    I am still curious if it has ever been confirmed that he jammed with Jimi Hendrix and if recordings were made?????
    According to Miles's autobiography, they met a few times and jammed a little but didn't record it. IIRC, Miles and Gil were in the stages of preparing for album sessions when they got the news Jimi had died.
    Last edited by Spiral; 08-10-2016 at 08:48 AM.

  12. #37
    Oh No! Bass Solo! klothos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    305
    I have a love/hate relationship with Miles Davis: Throughout his body of work, there's music I absolutely LOVE and stuff I absolutely hate....Interestingly enough, I have the same feeling toward Jaco Pastorius, although he floors me more often than not ( a bass player thang, of course)

  13. #38
    Needless to say, his cultural/historical/musical influence and importance and legacy are all colossal, and I sometimes still DO listen to Bitches, Silent, Kind Of and Agharta - yet I wouldn't name myself a "fan" as such, seeing how I could never really decide whether I ever "got" Miles in the same sense that I "got" Coltrane or Ayler. I have enormous respect, still I'm bewildered. It's enticing and intriguing and beguiling, but not truly stimulating to me. I prefer Ayreon at that. Or Bronski Beat.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  14. #39
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Posts
    4,395
    He has definetely 'covered' a lot of musical styles. No singing I think...


  15. #40
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    in a cosmic jazzy-groove around Brussels
    Posts
    4,025
    Miles Davis. Miles Davis. Miles Davis.

    Never heard of this dude!!!

    ===========

    From 67 to 75, he couldn't go wrong...

    Before that outside KoB and SoS, I don't care much...

    And after that, I don't care much either.... Except maybe for the Hot Spot soundtrack

    Quote Originally Posted by Fracktured View Post
    I tried numerous times to get into Miles but alas he's just not for me I guess. Maybe someday I'll get him. Arguably the greatest jazz musician of all time though.
    Miles was more of a catalyser... he made things happen and he did it better than anyone else (except maybe Mingus and Ellington)... but to call him the greatest musician is somewhat a different thing.

    Quote Originally Posted by wideopenears View Post
    I consider the Shorter/Hancock/Carter/Williams band to be the best small group Jazz that has ever existed.
    I'll definitely take the Coltrane quartet above that... Whether with Workman or Garrison on bass.
    Last edited by Trane; 08-10-2016 at 09:54 AM.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  16. #41
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    in a cosmic jazzy-groove around Brussels
    Posts
    4,025
    Quote Originally Posted by Poisoned Youth View Post
    Speaking strictly pre-70s, I think I have gotten more mileage from the Coltrane Quartet than the "2nd great Miles quintet", primarily because the Coltrane material not only stretches out more but sounds more fresh 50 years later when compared to the plethora of jazz bands out there since.
    Absolutely.

    I realize that Miles made tons of things during the 50's (and even 40's) and the 60's, but Trane did more for the "jazz cause" in the timeframe from 61 to 65 (basically his Impulse! days + Olé Coltrane), not even mentioning the Ascension album and what came after.

    I don't what would've musically happened if he had survived unscathed post-67, but in some weird mythical way, his untimely death wasn't
    maybe so untimely for his legend.

    And indeed, his modal jazz still sounds quite actual compared to Miles' Cool and Post-bops 60's stuff....

    And Trane's legacy (Alice, McCoy, Archie, Pharoah, Ravi, ... and even Kamazi Washington) is at least as impressive as Miles'
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  17. #42
    I heard when he toured Europe he was billed as Kilometer Davis.
    NEVER UNDERESTIMATE THE POWER OF STUPID PEOPLE IN LARGE GROUPS!

  18. #43
    Member No Pride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Chicago, IL, USA
    Posts
    137
    Quote Originally Posted by Poisoned Youth View Post
    Speaking strictly pre-70s, I think I have gotten more mileage from the Coltrane Quartet than the "2nd great Miles quintet", primarily because the Coltrane material not only stretches out more but sounds more fresh 50 years later when compared to the plethora of jazz bands out there since.
    Perhaps the Coltrane Quartet sounds more fresh because it hasn't been imitated quite as much as Miles' Second Quintet, I don't know. As for stretching out more, I'm not sure that's accurate. Both bands were forward thinking and experimental, basically utilizing the newer concepts of freedom while still maintaining a steady pulse. They just approached it in very different ways. I was into Coltrane's Quartet a couple of decades before I discovered the work of Miles' Quintet of the '60s. Before that, I thought Coltrane's group were the leading groundbreakers of the time, after, I felt Miles' band was right up there with them, though with a decidely different approach. YMMV.

  19. #44
    Member No Pride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Chicago, IL, USA
    Posts
    137
    Quote Originally Posted by Poisoned Youth View Post
    I usually tend to spin 60s Hancock, Shorter, and Williams recordings more than the actual quintet by a wide margin.
    Same here, gotta admit! I like form and the members of Miles' Quintet were more into it on their own albums from the same time period; not to mention they were phenomenal jazz composers.

  20. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by No Pride View Post
    Same here, gotta admit! I like form and the members of Miles' Quintet were more into it on their own albums from the same time period; not to mention they were phenomenal jazz composers.
    Tony's Blue Note albums sound very free to my ears. My favorite Herbie album is the trio + Latin percussion album, Inventions And Dimensions.

  21. #46
    Progga mogrooves's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    The Past
    Posts
    1,895
    I prefer the SGQ to the Coltrane 4tet (yes, sacrilege, I know!). Hipper all around, imo. I can hear Miles & Co. thinking through complexity, whereas the 4tet was about direct expression, a notion I've always found dubious, though I won't deny its efficacy and the skill with which it is accomplished. The initial self-imposed constraints of the 4tet became something of a trap in time (and ultimately compelled a move to a place that both McCoy & Elvin wouldn't go), whereas the SGQ was much more open within the bounds of absolutely hip structures (sonic "Cubism"). The two groups represent a complementary binary, a kind of ying/yang, Dionysian/Apollonian, cerebration/emotion thing, but I gotta go with Miles at that point in time.
    Hell, they ain't even old-timey ! - Homer Stokes

  22. #47
    Member wideopenears's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    481
    Quote Originally Posted by No Pride View Post
    Perhaps the Coltrane Quartet sounds more fresh because it hasn't been imitated quite as much as Miles' Second Quintet, I don't know. As for stretching out more, I'm not sure that's accurate. Both bands were forward thinking and experimental, basically utilizing the newer concepts of freedom while still maintaining a steady pulse. They just approached it in very different ways. I was into Coltrane's Quartet a couple of decades before I discovered the work of Miles' Quintet of the '60s. Before that, I thought Coltrane's group were the leading groundbreakers of the time, after, I felt Miles' band was right up there with them, though with a decidely different approach. YMMV.
    Coltrane's my favorite musician ever, and I love his Quartets, as well as most everything else he did. Ascension gets an annual airing, but the Impulse quartet records are regularly spun in my house.

    But the thing about the Second Miles Quintet was the group interplay.....the sort of collective conversation and improvisation....I think it was unique. Yes, it's created a ton of imitators, but they did it first. With the first quartet, and to some degree with Coltrane's groups, there is still more of a "head/solos/head" sort of thing....Miles Smiles, Sorcerer, and those second quartet records seem more "free" and I just hear the guys interacting more, even when there are discrete solos.

    Perhaps it's just me, though.
    "And this is the chorus.....or perhaps it's a bridge...."

  23. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by Spiral View Post
    The quality sounds fine to me. I saw it's a small label, but didn't get the impression it was dodgy or anything... then again, I didn't put much thought into that partly because it's not a living artist dependent on the income or anything.


    Really? It must be the one about the scaffold (the title's escaping me right now). That's good stuff, but somehow I feel sad at the thought of it being used in a commercial.
    Here is the album used for the Lincoln commercials.
    https://www.amazon.com/Ascenseur-Pou.../dp/B000004785

    It is also available from Pure Audio in hi-rez Blu-Ray, which sounds pretty fantastic.

  24. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave (in MA) View Post

    "Willie Nelson" dates at least as far back as 1981, when a 1970 version of it was released on the "Directions" compilation. The boxer Willie Nelson wasn't born until 1987 and wasn't even active in boxing until after the box came out. So, was there an earlier boxer by that name, or is the piece named after everybody's favorite weed-smoking, tax-avoiding country singer?
    Miles was a fan of the country singer.

  25. #50
    Miles is so essential to the development of 20th Century American music, that it's tough to analyze his contribution properly. I'm as much a jazz fan as a rock fan, and I enjoy all of his eras, other than the Birth of the Cool stuff, which just isn't my style.

    Interestingly, I find him to be more of a stylist than a virtuoso on his instrument. Freddie Hubbard and Donald Byrd were much more sure-footed on the instrument, but Miles was far more distinctive as a stylist, IMO.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •