Thread: And the best Black and White movie ever is:

  1. #3101
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad View Post
    You tried Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy? Thats my kind of spy movie, though the BBC series was much better
    Yes. Saw both and thought the movie was better only because it wasn't so damn long. I remember very little of the series, other than Alec Guinness and his big glasses.

    BTW, George Smiley has a bit part in The Spy Who Came in From the Cold.

    I just checked and I've seen 7 (of 10) movies that were adapted from a John le Carré novel:

    The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965)
    The Little Drummer Girl (1984)
    The Russia House (1990)
    The Tailor of Panama (2001)
    The Constant Gardener (2005)
    Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011)
    A Most Wanted Man (2014)

    Of those, The Spy Who Came in From the Cold and A Most Wanted Man were the best, imo. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is a close 3rd. The rest you could skip.

    The three I haven't seen are The Deadly Affair (1967), The Looking Glass War (1970), and Our Kind of Traitor (2016), all of which I'd like to see.
    I never drink water. Fish fuck in it. - W. C. Fields

  2. #3102
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    The TV series based on The Night Manager was very, very good.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  3. #3103
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Yes it was
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  4. #3104
    What better way to spend a Friday night during a pandemic and riots?

    On TCM

    8:00 PM Monkey Business (1931)
    9:30 PM Horse Feathers (1932)
    10:45 PM Animal Crackers (1930)
    12:30 AM Duck Soup (1933)
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

    - Dr. Winston O'Boogie

  5. #3105
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronmac View Post
    What better way to spend a Friday night during a pandemic and riots?


    12:30 AM Duck Soup (1933)
    "If you think this country's bad off now,
    Just wait 'till I get through with it."
    No matter how corrupt, greedy, and heartless our government, our corporations, our media, and our religious and charitable institutions may become, the music will still be wonderful. - Kurt Vonnegut

  6. #3106
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    Did any of you know William Powell was once married to Carole Lombard???

    I also just found out he was engaged to Jean Harlow when she passed away.

    Quote Originally Posted by ronmac View Post
    What better way to spend a Friday night during a pandemic and riots?

    On TCM

    8:00 PM Monkey Business (1931)
    9:30 PM Horse Feathers (1932)
    10:45 PM Animal Crackers (1930)
    12:30 AM Duck Soup (1933)
    I finally saw Duck Soup the last time it was on. Apparently, this is often considered their best movie. I almost hate to admit this but I did not enjoy it.

    I honestly can't remember if I've seen Monkey Business or Horse Feathers. I saw Animal Crackers a loooong time ago and thought it was funny.
    I never drink water. Fish fuck in it. - W. C. Fields

  7. #3107
    Member Staun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    Yes. Saw both and thought the movie was better only because it wasn't so damn long. I remember very little of the series, other than Alec Guinness and his big glasses.

    BTW, George Smiley has a bit part in The Spy Who Came in From the Cold.

    I just checked and I've seen 7 (of 10) movies that were adapted from a John le Carré novel:

    The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965)
    The Little Drummer Girl (1984)
    The Russia House (1990)
    The Tailor of Panama (2001)
    The Constant Gardener (2005)
    Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011)
    A Most Wanted Man (2014)

    Of those, The Spy Who Came in From the Cold and A Most Wanted Man were the best, imo. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is a close 3rd. The rest you could skip.

    The three I haven't seen are The Deadly Affair (1967), The Looking Glass War (1970), and Our Kind of Traitor (2016), all of which I'd like to see.
    Hal, I wanted to like Russia House but it was just so flat, nothing really held my interest. TSWCIFTC is a great film.
    The older I get, the better I was.

  8. #3108
    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    Did any of you know William Powell was once married to Carole Lombard???

    I also just found out he was engaged to Jean Harlow when she passed away.


    I finally saw Duck Soup the last time it was on. Apparently, this is often considered their best movie. I almost hate to admit this but I did not enjoy it.

    I honestly can't remember if I've seen Monkey Business or Horse Feathers. I saw Animal Crackers a loooong time ago and thought it was funny.
    It is usually listed as their best. Apparently, it got mixed reviews when it premiered. Groucho thought Animal Crackers was their best.
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

    - Dr. Winston O'Boogie

  9. #3109
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Staun View Post
    Hal, I wanted to like Russia House but it was just so flat, nothing really held my interest.
    Yep. I had the same reaction to The Constant Gardener, too.

    If you haven't seen it, you should check out A Most Wanted Man. It stars Philip Seymour Hoffman in his last(?) role. Good movie.

    Quote Originally Posted by ronmac View Post
    Groucho thought Animal Crackers was their best.
    I don't know if I'll watch it, but I'm definitely interested in Monkey Business, primarily because it's not an adaptation.
    I never drink water. Fish fuck in it. - W. C. Fields

  10. #3110
    Bride of Frankenstein is on Me-TV tonight.
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

    - Dr. Winston O'Boogie

  11. #3111
    Quote Originally Posted by ronmac View Post
    Bride of Frankenstein is on Me-TV tonight.
    Commercials.

  12. #3112
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    This is both funny and disturbing:

    I never drink water. Fish fuck in it. - W. C. Fields

  13. #3113
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    This is both funny and disturbing:

    That Outer Limits thing, the bugs and the eyes?
    The older I get, the better I was.

  14. #3114
    Quote Originally Posted by nycsteve View Post
    Commercials.
    And stupid routines. I have the DVD, anyway.
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

    - Dr. Winston O'Boogie

  15. #3115
    Wasn't there a Marty Feldman Eyes parody of that song already?
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

    - Dr. Winston O'Boogie

  16. #3116
    Member Staun's Avatar
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    Anyway, thankfully, Anatomy of a Murder is on and Lee Remick is sitting on the couch drinking a beer. THIS is disturbing.
    The older I get, the better I was.

  17. #3117
    Member Staun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronmac View Post
    And stupid routines. I have the DVD, anyway.
    Bathroom and refill break anyway.
    The older I get, the better I was.

  18. #3118
    Quote Originally Posted by Staun View Post
    Bathroom and refill break anyway.
    I was thinking the same thing.
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

    - Dr. Winston O'Boogie

  19. #3119
    "A Hard Day's Night" and "Don't Look Back" are on TCM tonight.
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

    - Dr. Winston O'Boogie

  20. #3120
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    I read a little about AHDN on Wikipedia the other day and discovered it scores in the top 5 of RottenTomatoes' "Top 100 Musical & Performing Arts Movies". I looked up the list on RT itself. Take a look at the top 10:

    1. The Wizard of Oz (1939)
    2. Singin' in the Rain (1952)
    3. La La Land (2016)
    4. Top Hat (1935)
    5. A Hard Day's Night (1964)
    6. Pinocchio (1940)
    7. An American in Paris (1951)
    8. The Red Shoes (1948)
    9. Amazing Grace (2019)
    10. Mary Poppins (1964)

    It's hard to argue with the top two, altho I'd switch them, but where's The Sound of Music? It's not even in the top 100! Sure, it may be corny but, for sheer ticket sales, it's in the top 3 of ALL movies of all time! And, yes, I think it's a good movie.

    And Top Hat at #4?? Please! I finally saw it in the past year and I wasn't that impressed.

    FWIW, I never really considered a movie like A Hard Day's Night a musical. But RT's list made me rethink that, and in the broadest definition, I guess it is.

    As for the rest, including 11-100, I couldn't really care less since Musical is my least favorite genre of movie; I generally think they're stupid, especially the ones with lots of choreography. Just not my thing. I remember when I was in high school I took a film studies class called "Fiction into Film", which was good for an English credit, btw. Anyway, we were watching a movie and there was a strange pause in the dialogue before it started up again. A guy sitting next to me said, "whew. For a minute there I thought they were going into a song." I cracked up and got us in trouble. But his comment illustrates my biggest complaint with musicals: they make no sense. Yes, I know, it's not about that. Of course, 9 times out of 10, the music in musicals sucks, too.

    If you're curious, here's the link: Top 100 Musicals

    In comparison, here's AFI's list of greatest musicals:

    1 Singin' in the Rain
    2 West Side Story
    3 The Wizard of Oz
    4 The Sound of Music
    5 Cabaret
    6 Mary Poppins
    7 A Star Is Born (1954)
    8 My Fair Lady
    9 An American in Paris
    10 Meet Me in St. Louis
    11 The King and I
    12 Chicago
    13 42nd Street
    14 All That Jazz
    15 Top Hat
    16 Funny Girl
    17 The Band Wagon
    18 Yankee Doodle Dandy
    19 On the Town
    20 Grease
    21 Seven Brides for Seven Brothers
    22 Beauty and the Beast
    23 Guys and Dolls
    24 Show Boat
    25 Moulin Rouge!

    Again, I don't particularly care. To me, what makes a musical good is if I'm willing to see it again and by that criteria, this would be my top - and only - 11:

    1. Singin' in the Rain (this is just an excellent movie)
    2. A Hard Day's Night
    3. Paint Your Wagon (no, Clint Eastwood and Lee Marvin can't really sing. But who cares? It's a funny movie)
    4. The Wizard of Oz
    5. The Commitments (a sleeper and cult film from Ireland. If you've never seen it, do! Tons of great music and quite funny, as well. It won four BAFTA Awards for Best Film, Direction, Adapted Screenplay, and Editing)
    6. Yellow Submarine
    7. The Sound of Music
    8. Meet Me in St Louis
    9. Help!
    10. All That Jazz (which I guess is a musical. <shrug> Roy Scheider is great in it)
    11. A Star is Born (1976) (it's kind of hokey but I actually liked it; never seen any of the others)

    Disclaimers:
    • I've never seen An American in Paris and have wanted to because, well... Gene Kelly is the boss.
    • I've wanted to see Cabaret for a long time. Not sure why. And I wouldn't mind seeing 42nd Street, too.
    • I would rather never see another movie than ever have to see Grease. Having to hear that stupid fucking song (You're the One That I Want) every time I turned on the radio in 1978 was enough for me.
    • I would rather have my eyes poked out than ever see Footloose again... or to finish it. IIRC, I walked out before the 2nd act even started. No, it wasn't my choice to see it.

    Incidentally, the only musical I've ever seen on the stage (on Broadway, no less) was Oh! Calcutta! It was actually good. The nudity helped.
    I never drink water. Fish fuck in it. - W. C. Fields

  21. #3121
    The King And I and My Fair Lady both hold together as far as plot and story. And both have excellent music. Etcetera , etcetera.
    If you didnt like Top Hat you wont like 42Street.

  22. #3122
    Quote Originally Posted by Hal... View Post
    I read a little about AHDN on Wikipedia the other day and discovered it scores in the top 5 of RottenTomatoes' "Top 100 Musical & Performing Arts Movies". I looked up the list on RT itself. Take a look at the top 10:

    1. The Wizard of Oz (1939)
    2. Singin' in the Rain (1952)
    3. La La Land (2016)
    4. Top Hat (1935)
    5. A Hard Day's Night (1964)
    6. Pinocchio (1940)
    7. An American in Paris (1951)
    8. The Red Shoes (1948)
    9. Amazing Grace (2019)
    10. Mary Poppins (1964)

    It's hard to argue with the top two, altho I'd switch them, but where's The Sound of Music? It's not even in the top 100! Sure, it may be corny but, for sheer ticket sales, it's in the top 3 of ALL movies of all time! And, yes, I think it's a good movie.

    And Top Hat at #4?? Please! I finally saw it in the past year and I wasn't that impressed.

    FWIW, I never really considered a movie like A Hard Day's Night a musical. But RT's list made me rethink that, and in the broadest definition, I guess it is.

    As for the rest, including 11-100, I couldn't really care less since Musical is my least favorite genre of movie; I generally think they're stupid, especially the ones with lots of choreography. Just not my thing. I remember when I was in high school I took a film studies class called "Fiction into Film", which was good for an English credit, btw. Anyway, we were watching a movie and there was a strange pause in the dialogue before it started up again. A guy sitting next to me said, "whew. For a minute there I thought they were going into a song." I cracked up and got us in trouble. But his comment illustrates my biggest complaint with musicals: they make no sense. Yes, I know, it's not about that. Of course, 9 times out of 10, the music in musicals sucks, too.

    If you're curious, here's the link: Top 100 Musicals

    In comparison, here's AFI's list of greatest musicals:

    1 Singin' in the Rain
    2 West Side Story
    3 The Wizard of Oz
    4 The Sound of Music
    5 Cabaret
    6 Mary Poppins
    7 A Star Is Born (1954)
    8 My Fair Lady
    9 An American in Paris
    10 Meet Me in St. Louis
    11 The King and I
    12 Chicago
    13 42nd Street
    14 All That Jazz
    15 Top Hat
    16 Funny Girl
    17 The Band Wagon
    18 Yankee Doodle Dandy
    19 On the Town
    20 Grease
    21 Seven Brides for Seven Brothers
    22 Beauty and the Beast
    23 Guys and Dolls
    24 Show Boat
    25 Moulin Rouge!

    Again, I don't particularly care. To me, what makes a musical good is if I'm willing to see it again and by that criteria, this would be my top - and only - 11:

    1. Singin' in the Rain (this is just an excellent movie)
    2. A Hard Day's Night
    3. Paint Your Wagon (no, Clint Eastwood and Lee Marvin can't really sing. But who cares? It's a funny movie)
    4. The Wizard of Oz
    5. The Commitments (a sleeper and cult film from Ireland. If you've never seen it, do! Tons of great music and quite funny, as well. It won four BAFTA Awards for Best Film, Direction, Adapted Screenplay, and Editing)
    6. Yellow Submarine
    7. The Sound of Music
    8. Meet Me in St Louis
    9. Help!
    10. All That Jazz (which I guess is a musical. <shrug> Roy Scheider is great in it)
    11. A Star is Born (1976) (it's kind of hokey but I actually liked it; never seen any of the others)

    Disclaimers:
    • I've never seen An American in Paris and have wanted to because, well... Gene Kelly is the boss.
    • I've wanted to see Cabaret for a long time. Not sure why. And I wouldn't mind seeing 42nd Street, too.
    • I would rather never see another movie than ever have to see Grease. Having to hear that stupid fucking song (You're the One That I Want) every time I turned on the radio in 1978 was enough for me.
    • I would rather have my eyes poked out than ever see Footloose again... or to finish it. IIRC, I walked out before the 2nd act even started. No, it wasn't my choice to see it.

    Incidentally, the only musical I've ever seen on the stage (on Broadway, no less) was Oh! Calcutta! It was actually good. The nudity helped.
    Nice rant, Barry. I agree with most of it. It's also my least-favorite genre.

    Every time I hear "Singin' in the Rain," I think of "A Clockwork Orange."
    "A conspiracy of silence speaks louder than words."

    - Dr. Winston O'Boogie

  23. #3123
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    My least fave genre as well. Musical theater and I are not even on speaking terms. I can appreciate the craft involved but jaysus, it's music with every bit of sand, piss, and vinegar taken away. Not to mention the over the top theatrics just seem ridiculous to a guy who prefers guitar, bass, keys, and drums. I did watch Singing in the Rain last night because I'd never seen it and Ben M was saying in the intro it was the best of the old school musicals. I see his point in that the story was superior to nearly all of that genre, I had an actual interest in seeing how they were going to pull it off and the movie history that was part of the plot.

    My wife and I watch White Christmas every year so we have this nostalgia thing going for that. Other than that, the only musicals I like are: A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Fiddler on the Roof, Paint Your Wagon (the corruption of young Horton Fenty was hilarious), Cabaret ("The Future Belongs to Me" was one of Fosse's best scenes), All That Jazz (Fosse's magnificent ode to Death!), The Commitments (Fook me - it's Imelda Quirke's ass coming over the fence!), and the Beatles movies.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  24. #3124
    No one thought to mention the recent Yesterday?

  25. #3125
    Member Staun's Avatar
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    Yeah, I'll pass except for maybe The Beatles.
    The older I get, the better I was.

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