Thread: The "Official" Ennio Morricone Thread

  1. #851
    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    Man! That is some good jazz/avant prog!

    If I'd heard it with no attribution, I might have almost thought it was by John Zorn - although parts are pure Morricone, and could be no one else. I wonder whether it was done all-at-once, or whether Morricone recorded the rhythm section, maybe as a conduction, then orchestrated the result. Morricone claimed to dislike rock - which he saw as the fumblings of amateurs - but music like this suggests that opinion was an development of his cranky old age.
    I didn't hear much rock
    more like jazz and classical contemporary

  2. #852
    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    Morricone claimed to dislike rock - which he saw as the fumblings of amateurs
    I think you are right

  3. #853
    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    Morricone claimed to dislike rock - which he saw as the fumblings of amateurs
    I think you are right

  4. #854
    Ennio Morricone soundtrack for Ninfa Plebea by Lina Wertmüller
    Two beautiful themes one romantic one dramatic interwined
    Dieter Moebius : "Art people like things they don’t understand!"

  5. #855

  6. #856

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  8. #858
    Quote Originally Posted by Udi Koomran View Post
    I have acumilated all the clips in this thread into 2 playlists
    My old one
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...SnXazZpQAYhpNn
    and contributions by fellow members
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...t50JiRwTqF8ldJ
    That are two great lists Udi !!! I had a bit of trouble finding some scores I like, because I couldn't remember the title. So I started burning CDs for my favourite files and printed out the covers. Listened again a lot to Giu La Testa, 5 Man Army and Ninfea Plebea.

  9. #859
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    My big regret about the Maestro is that he never, as far as I know, worked in extended forms. Did he ever write any actual operas or symphonies? Some of his longer cues, like the ones he wrote for The Hateful 8, approach symphonic movements in length, but not really in formal content.

  10. #860
    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    My big regret about the Maestro is that he never, as far as I know, worked in extended forms. Did he ever write any actual operas or symphonies? Some of his longer cues, like the ones he wrote for The Hateful 8, approach symphonic movements in length, but not really in formal content.
    He wrote one opera, 4 concertos and a mass
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...bsolute)_music

  11. #861
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    Quote Originally Posted by Udi Koomran View Post
    I have acumilated all the clips in this thread into 2 playlists
    My old one
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...SnXazZpQAYhpNn
    and contributions by fellow members
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...t50JiRwTqF8ldJ
    Awesome dude - thanks for this.
    If it isn't Krautrock, it's krap.

    "And it was wicked of you big dead boy
    Suddenly just went to sleep
    Well here we are..." - Tim Smith (1961-2020)

  12. #862
    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    Awesome dude - thanks for this.
    Here is one that my pal Pierre Chevalier compiled

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...1XdoEDvXGjDOvP

  13. #863
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    Quote Originally Posted by Udi Koomran View Post
    I have acumilated all the clips in this thread into 2 playlists
    My old one
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...SnXazZpQAYhpNn
    and contributions by fellow members
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...t50JiRwTqF8ldJ
    Thanks Udi. Fantastic playlists. Please keep them coming.
    Day dawns dark...it now numbers infinity.

  14. #864
    Banned Dave (in MA)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave (in MA) View Post
    Is there a version of the Hateful Eight soundtrack that doesn't have a bunch of pop music and dialog bits?

    edit: Screw it, I found a cheap copy on eBay and I can rip only the Morricone stuff

    Is the movie worth watching?
    Heh: https://www.progressiveears.org/foru...l=1#post504908

  15. #865
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    Just watched the Stendahl Syndrome the other night, and his score and themes were incredibly effective. Dario Argento's films and Ennio Morricone's music fit like a glove.

    neil

  16. #866
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    Quote Originally Posted by boilk View Post
    Dario Argento's films and Ennio Morricone's music fit like a glove.

    neil
    That's because Morricone was connected to Dario Argento long before Argento went on to make films. So they already had a feel for each other. Sergio Leone, Bernardo Bertolucci and Dario Argento co-wrote the screenplay for Leone's epic masterpiece, Once Upon A Time In The West. My God, with the talents of those three, no wonder that screenplay IMO is one of the greatest I've ever seen and heard. So deep, so many side stories, so much depth and insight about what civilization with bring to the wild frontier, and how it will end an ancient way of life.
    Day dawns dark...it now numbers infinity.

  17. #867
    Banned Dave (in MA)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AncientChord View Post
    That's because Morricone was connected to Dario Argento long before Argento went on to make films. So they already had a feel for each other. Sergio Leone, Bernardo Bertolucci and Dario Argento co-wrote the screenplay for Leone's epic masterpiece, Once Upon A Time In The West. My God, with the talents of those three, no wonder that screenplay IMO is one of the greatest I've ever seen and heard.
    They actually got an impressive acting performance out of Charles Bronson.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AncientChord View Post
    That's because Morricone was connected to Dario Argento long before Argento went on to make films. So they already had a feel for each other. Sergio Leone, Bernardo Bertolucci and Dario Argento co-wrote the screenplay for Leone's epic masterpiece, Once Upon A Time In The West. My God, with the talents of those three, no wonder that screenplay IMO is one of the greatest I've ever seen and heard. So deep, so many side stories, so much depth and insight about what civilization with bring to the wild frontier, and how it will end an ancient way of life.
    I'm aware of the history and you're quite right in all that you say.

    neil

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave (in MA) View Post
    They actually got an impressive acting performance out of Charles Bronson.
    I also liked him in The Great Escape and Guns For San Sebastian, with its masterpiece Morricone score.
    Day dawns dark...it now numbers infinity.

  20. #870
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    Quote Originally Posted by AncientChord View Post
    .......so much depth and insight about what civilization with bring to the wild frontier, and how it will end an ancient way of life.
    Was it really that ancient, though?

    The Wild West as described in fiction - and I don't know how much resemblance it had to the real one - came least partly from the defeated Confederate plantation culture. Both had the same traits of murderous prickly pride and frequent dueling, often over the most trivial disputes. That, in turn came from both the romances of Sir Walter Scott and from the Southerners' own roots as British-aristocrat Cavaliers, who'd lost the English Civil War, fled to Jamaica, established slave-worked plantations, and eventually moved on further to the American South. So I suppose you could liken those legendary Western gunfighters to Scott's knights-errant. But there was no direct cultural line: The Southerners-turned-Westerners may have been distantly descended from knights-errant, but there hadn't been any actual such men for centuries.

    Or, in other words, it may have been an ancient way of life - but in their case, it was at least partially invented from literary sources and artificially adopted.

  21. #871
    Banned Dave (in MA)'s Avatar
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    If I'm breaking any rules by linking this, I can take it down.
    http://bigozine2.com/roio/?p=1186
    "Live at the Auditorium RAI “A. Toscanini”, Torino, Italy; by “Il Cartellone - Radio Tre Suite”, Radio 3 RAI. March 24, 2012."
    Do yourself a favor and skip reading the comments.

  22. #872
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    Was it really that ancient, though?

    The Wild West as described in fiction - and I don't know how much resemblance it had to the real one - came least partly from the defeated Confederate plantation culture. Both had the same traits of murderous prickly pride and frequent dueling, often over the most trivial disputes. That, in turn came from both the romances of Sir Walter Scott and from the Southerners' own roots as British-aristocrat Cavaliers, who'd lost the English Civil War, fled to Jamaica, established slave-worked plantations, and eventually moved on further to the American South. So I suppose you could liken those legendary Western gunfighters to Scott's knights-errant. But there was no direct cultural line: The Southerners-turned-Westerners may have been distantly descended from knights-errant, but there hadn't been any actual such men for centuries.

    Or, in other words, it may have been an ancient way of life - but in their case, it was at least partially invented from literary sources and artificially adopted.
    I believe, in Leone's vision, he meant that the way of the free wandering drifter was coming to an end as civilization encroached farther and farther west. And yes many of these drifters certainly existed in the old west. They were in reality strong, tough 19th century survivalists and totally dependent on their own means to survive. They packed everything they needed, including weapons, to exist between frontier towns, where many attempted to cash in in several different ways, then move on to the next town. And as we have seen in many western films, especially in Spaghetti Westerns, many were good trackers and became bounty hunters. Most lived and died in obscurity, but there are a few famous examples. The most famous was probably Wyatt Earp. Earp and his brothers grew up in Missouri. After his new young wife tragically died, Wyatt became a drifter, going from frontier town to frontier town where he took on various different jobs and learned to be a gambler and a gunslinger. He had brushes with the law, but after being hired as a lawman in Wichita Kansas, his reputation changed. It was also while Wyatt was pursuing an outlaw in Texas, that he met and befriended the equally famous drifter Doc Holliday. Eventually Holliday and several of the Earp brothers ended up in one of the last wild frontiers towns, Tombstone, Arizona Territory. After the well documented events in Tombstone, Wyatt continued the life of a drifter, going from boom town to boom town, although this time not alone. His common law wife, who he met in Tombstone accompanied him for the remainder of his life. IMO this person, and what happened in Tombstone in 1881 and 82 created the mythology of the old west. So many western films have used Earp's story as a blue print for the wild west. But it was Leone, and the Italian Westerns that showed more of the reality of life on the American frontier. In reality the good guy didn't wear a white hat, and the bad guy didn't wear a black one. Sorry for the pun but most personalities of these loners all had a bit of good, bad and ugly in them. So I guess my point is that mythology is usually based in fact.
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  23. #873
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    Quote Originally Posted by AncientChord View Post
    I believe, in Leone's vision, he meant that the way of the free wandering drifter was coming to an end as civilization encroached farther and farther west.
    I see what you mean.
    • Cheyenne is a bad-man, but a romantic figure as well, and he's about to die at the end of the film.
    • Il Uomo Sine Nomine con la Armonica has geared his entire life around vengeance on Frank, but what is there for him after he achieves it?
    • Frank is the baddest of bad-men, but after Armonica kills half his gang - and he kills the rest and his own employer out of suspicion - he has nothing left at all.
    Last edited by Baribrotzer; 6 Days Ago at 12:38 AM.

  24. #874
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    I see what you mean.
    • Cheyenne is a bad-man, but a romantic figure as well, and he's about to die at the end of the film.
    • Il Uomo Sine Nomine con la Armonica has geared his entire live around vengeance on Frank, but what is there for him after he achieves it?
    • Frank is the baddest of bad-men, but after Armonica kills half his gang - and he kills the rest and his own employer out of suspicion - he has nothing left at all.
    Yes, the symbolic references to all we both discussed above ^^^^ is what makes Once Upon A Time In The West not only one of the all time top westerns, it is also one of cinema's greatest achivements IMO. Again the astounding depth of the film with so many insights into the human condition never ceases to fascinate. I've watched the film at least 20 times, and still stumble onto a point in the film I missed on earlier views. And then you add Ennio Morricone's haunting and iconic score and the film takes cinema into a higher level, an artistic dreamy surrealistic experience rarely achieved before or since. I don't know if cinema could ever get any better that this, really. Sorry to ramble, but I love Spaghetti Westerns and learning about the real old west. And of course what Leone and Morricone created certainly brought so much more realism and added so much more to the mythology.
    Day dawns dark...it now numbers infinity.

  25. #875
    Reminder : a few of the maestro's scores that went under my radar
    need to revisit/discover
    LE MANI SPORCHE
    I Cannibali
    Burn
    The Red Tent

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