Thread: The "Official" Ennio Morricone Thread

  1. #51
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Udi Koomran View Post
    The real locations Almerķa TABERNAS spain

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...sh-desert.html
    I w/should think they'd create a museum around these "ruins" ... surely there is potential for tourism in a very-visted state that is economically-ruined.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Udi Koomran View Post
    The real locations Almerķa TABERNAS spain

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...sh-desert.html
    Nice. I knew that they filmed in Europe but didn't know exactly. That place should be preserved!

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    Metallica and the Ramones used "THE ECSTASY OF GOLD' this piece as their opening theme for their live performances. Metallica used it since 1983. This man is a living legend. Gonna watch me some Clint movies tonight just for the music. The Spaghetti Westerns seemed to be long and drawn out because SergioLeone did not want the music to stop, this according to Marricone himself!

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    Quote Originally Posted by HONDO View Post
    .....
    This man is a living legend. Gonna watch me some Clint movies tonight just for the music. The Spaghetti Westerns seemed to be long and drawn out because SergioLeone did not want the music to stop, this according to Marricone himself!
    Yeah, I think its most characteristical feature was Morricone's Musical Pocket Watch used on 'For A Few Dollars More' - the music played on it featured one of the movie history's most notable and seamless blend of diegetic and non-diegetic moments through a recurring motif that originated from that gadget - every gun duel had first to wait for the music to finish. It was said: "When the chimes finish, begin!" . This is what Morricone said about it:
    "The music that the watch makes transfers your thought to a different place."
    "The character itself comes out through the watch but in a different situation every time it appears."



    Under Leone's explicit direction, Morricone began writing the score for 'For A Few Dollars More' before its production had started, as Leone often shot to the music on set.

    And yes, that film was also shot in Almerķa, Spain, with interiors done at Rome's Cinecittą Studios. The production designer Carlo Simi built the town of "El Paso" in the Almerķa desert: it still exists, as a tourist attraction Mini Hollywood.

    As all of the film's footage was shot silent (without recording sound at time of shooting), Eastwood and Van Cleef returned to Italy where they dubbed over their dialogue, and sound effects were added.
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  5. #55
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    Udi has really opened my eyes on this guy - I knew his name, knew he did soundtracks, etc, etc but really had no idea to the extent of how prolific, prodigious, influential, and dare I say how flat out brilliant this man is. I am finding myself driving around today listening to "Good, Bad, Ugly" soundtrack in my car and just totally loving it, even spinning it on repeat. There is a certain quality in his music - like a certain thread that runs through all of it - its hard to describe, but its there. Its like a certain ingredient that is always used in every dish, and it makes it special, but there would be something missing without it. I'm not sure if you know to what i am referring to, but to my ears its 'there'.

    Udi - when you first told me that you were into EM, I definitely thought it was interesting but I didn't really 'get it' right away. I would say that now i am beginning to see why this happened after exploring these works and really hearing this man's work. We had in-laws over and even during dinner I played Cinema Paradisio. I might be getting a bit obsessed

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    A few months ago, I was reading up on Morricone, and stumbled into an interview where he actually laid out his personal "rules of thumb" for composition. One of these was to not repeat yourself in a melody. To judge from the music of his I've heard, he meant to not do exactly the same thing twice - to change the notes if you keep the same rhythm, or change the rhythm if you keep the same notes, or repeat a phrase but change the harmony under it or add another musical element... you get the idea. It was quite interesting and informative, but I never finished reading it and had to leave at the time.

    I have not been able to find that interview again, and wonder if one of you might have more luck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    A few months ago, I was reading up on Morricone, and stumbled into an interview where he actually laid out his personal "rules of thumb" for composition. One of these was to not repeat yourself in a melody. To judge from the music of his I've heard, he meant to not do exactly the same thing twice - to change the notes if you keep the same rhythm, or change the rhythm if you keep the same notes, or repeat a phrase but change the harmony under it or add another musical element... you get the idea. It was quite interesting and informative, but I never finished reading it and had to leave at the time.

    I have not been able to find that interview again, and wonder if one of you might have more luck.
    I recall Bartok saying something very similar - something to the effect of 'why play the same thing twice ?' (of course I'm paraphrasing).

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    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    I am finding myself driving around today listening to "Good, Bad, Ugly" soundtrack in my car and just totally loving it, even spinning it on repeat. There is a certain quality in his music - like a certain thread that runs through all of it - its hard to describe, but its there.
    Right on! It's a kind of magic indeed, people really want to listen to his music more and more. I think one of the reasons is that at least to me anyway his music sounds so intensely personal that it seems to speak intimately to each individual listening to it, it's something really amazing!
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  9. #59
    Prior to discovering Morricone I had this precondition that film scores are "applied music" and so in some way never "the real thing" since it was meant to serve another medium.
    As a progressive fan used to albums and even concept albums it was initially hard to adjust myself to this sort of listening experience
    Many of the soundtracks have not more then 3 themes and then multiple variations -so it took me time to realize that listening to soundtrack requires a different "mode" of listening

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    Just stumbled upon the most weirdly humorous starting of a piece I've ever heard from Morricone - it goes from a weird bassoon noises right at the start to a symphonic church organ providing kind of a reverb! And all gradually accompanied by a great orchestration. Amazing how it just develops from a single instrument to everything!



    It's 'The March of the Beggars', from the soundtrack to A Fistful of Dynamite, hope you enjoy.
    Last edited by Rick Robson; 05-22-2016 at 02:42 PM.
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  12. #62
    Gił la testa aka A Fistful of Dynamite is a great soundtrack the main theme is often played live on his shows

    https://youtu.be/cxTTF_8Pyso

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Robson View Post
    Just stumbled upon the most weirdly humorous starting of a piece I've ever heard from Morricone - 'The March of the Beggars', from the soundtrack to A Fistful of Dynamite, hope you enjoy. It goes from a weird bassoon noises right at the start to a symphonic church organ providing kind of a reverb! And all gradually accompanied by a great orchestration. Amazing how it just develops from a single instrument to everything!
    And how it also includes Alessandro Alessandroni ironically asserting his nationality, through the pointed repetition of a common epithet.

  14. #64
    This is what my pal Josh Pollock ( guitar player extrordinare for Daevid Allen's University Of Errors) wrote now on his Facebook page

    "Ennio Morricone is 87. When he passes, there will be the usual post-mortem avalanche of appraisal, summation, appreciation, wasn't-he-great, etc., which, for some reason, I hate being a part of. So I'm going to take this random moment, while he's still alive, to say that if a more formidable musical force ever walked the face of the earth, I haven't heard of 'em. The joy, inspiration, spiritual sustenance, and wtf-ness this man's work has brought me is immeasurable and seemingly inexhaustible. Prince, Bowie, The Beatles--all amazing. Morricone is more badass than all of them combined, and I know this is not a disrespectful statement because not one of these fallen giants would disagree with me. I love you, Ennio Morricone. Live long and prosper."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Udi Koomran View Post
    This is what my pal Josh Pollock ( guitar player extrordinare for Daevid Allen's University Of Errors) wrote now on his Facebook page

    "Ennio Morricone is 87. When he passes, there will be the usual post-mortem avalanche of appraisal, summation, appreciation, wasn't-he-great, etc., which, for some reason, I hate being a part of. So I'm going to take this random moment, while he's still alive, to say that if a more formidable musical force ever walked the face of the earth, I haven't heard of 'em. The joy, inspiration, spiritual sustenance, and wtf-ness this man's work has brought me is immeasurable and seemingly inexhaustible. Prince, Bowie, The Beatles--all amazing. Morricone is more badass than all of them combined, and I know this is not a disrespectful statement because not one of these fallen giants would disagree with me. I love you, Ennio Morricone. Live long and prosper."
    Very nice. That's true respect and admiration.

  16. #66
    Here is another relevant insight from Josh's FB page

    "Josh, are there a few records in particular that you love?"

    Josh Pollock : "That's the thing--no. The only way to really get the superhuman scope of his achievements is to dive in head first. At this point, I've listened to 80 or so his scores at this point (out of, apparently, at least 500!). Yes, a few are merely excellent accompaniments to whatever film they accompanied, but most of 'em are COMPLETELY different from each other, and chock full of amazing ideas/textures/melodies/arrangements/approaches/genres-he-made-up-just-for-that-one-score as to consistently re-blow my mind. If you need a direction to head in, I'd say almost anything from the 60s/early 70s is pretty ridiculous."

  17. #67
    Banned Dave (in MA)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    And how it also includes Alessandro Alessandroni ironically asserting his nationality, through the pointed repetition of a common epithet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave (in MA) View Post
    I wondered whether anybody was going to get that, or if it was just too bad a joke to even acknowledge.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    I wondered whether anybody was going to get that, or if it was just too bad a joke to even acknowledge.
    Ironically funny indeed, frankly I don't think I'd ever come up with this idea for that matter just from listening it.
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    Very nice. That's true respect and admiration.
    Agreed, pretty heartfelt words, to say the least. And repeating what Leonard Nimoy used to say: "Live long and prosper"
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Udi Koomran View Post
    Have a listen to this: inventiveness,creativity, humor


    https://youtu.be/YXJslMQX7ss
    This is unbelievable.

  22. #72
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    Does EM have a score that is unmistakably "Italian" in nature? Maybe even containing real or some faux Italian folk?

  23. #73
    Member Rick Robson's Avatar
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    The Untouchables - Exactly what you would expect from a composer who imagines America with an Italian mind, sees America with Italian eyes, and hears America with italian ears!
    Last edited by Rick Robson; 05-23-2016 at 11:40 PM.
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  24. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    Does EM have a score that is unmistakably "Italian" in nature? Maybe even containing real or some faux Italian folk?
    Sure.

    "March of the Beggars", which has already been mentioned here. Just listen to the lyrics.

  25. #75
    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    This is unbelievable.
    It took repeated listenings and my daughter to ask me "Dad what instrument are we hearing here ?" to realize the amazing synth work here - I mean this sounds so natural and bleds in with the rest in such a lovely way it almost sounds "acoustic" "organic "

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