Thread: The "Official" Ennio Morricone Thread

  1. #26
    Nice list man

    The Sicilian Clan
    Metti Una Sera a Cena
    The Infernal Trio Giu La testa
    Deborah's theme

    all great

    Ninna Nanna - I don't know - will check it out
    That makes sense the man composed over 500 scores


    Quote Originally Posted by loosefish View Post
    The master. Nuff said.

    The Sicilian Clan
    Metti una sera a cena
    The Infernal Trio
    Giu La Testa
    Deborah's Theme
    Ninna Nanna Per Adulteri (this is breathtaking, i could listen to it for hours).

    Those interested in the more experimental, psychedelic and unheard Morricone would do well to find a copy of Crime and Dissonance released on Mike Pattons Ipecac label. From that double cd: Un Uomo da Rispettare.

  2. #27
    Gialo favorites

    Spasmo
    https://youtu.be/qIhNea7QBso
    Una Lucertola Con La Pelle Di Donna
    https://youtu.be/4SFNuNR2O3A
    Quattro Mosche di Velluto Grigio
    https://youtu.be/ztOnObEL5JM
    Le Foto Proibite Di Una Signora Per Bene
    https://youtu.be/YFIUoaQ1qUo

  3. #28
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Udi Koomran View Post
    I love this

    https://youtu.be/RJU9w4TQq9I

    Did Art Zoyd listen to Morricone
    Maybe Jean Pierre Soarez wouldn't disapprove.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  4. #29
    No actually I got quite a few "likes" from Mr. Zab on my Morricone posts at Avant Progressive group Facebook

  5. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    This is totally great.
    This one is also in that "Art Zoyd" vein

    https://youtu.be/SZDkePQOGiY

  6. #31
    Member Rick Robson's Avatar
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    ^Thanks! , Morricone's talent for orchestral arrangements is out of this world...
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  7. #32
    Member Rick Robson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AncientChord View Post
    The western world of the maestro is an exciting and often surreal listening experience. Utter and true genius! Here's the best place from Italy to obtain the best of his best: http://www.intermezzomedia.com/
    For another useful Morricone's works reference source I suggest check that out.

    I still don't know these, will have to check them out too , pretty sure they are on the same league of:

    Goodbye Palermo;
    To Come Back To Palermo; and
    Far Memories Of Sicily.
    Last edited by Rick Robson; 05-19-2016 at 07:00 PM.
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  8. #33
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    This is pretty fuckin phenomenal - especially at around 1:30 where it gets a bit Messiaen-esque for a few moments. What a MOOD.

  9. #34
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    Actually the whole thing is great.

  10. #35
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    Glad to see this appreciation here. As many here know, I'm a fanatic of Morricone's western scores. But I don't diss the other fabulous scores he has written for other movie genres. However IMO, there is no music in this world as unique as those westerns. It's funny that EM finally got his Oscar for "The Hateful Eight," as again IMO it's a great score, however TGTB&TU and/or OUATITW should have been given the statue by the Academy when those films were released. TH8 pales in comparison. I think the Academy members finally realized that this great composer was long overdue for the honor. To me Ennio Morricone is a living God of music, and in my life there is no greater composer of music for films. BRAVO, MAESTRO!
    Day dawns dark...it now numbers infinity.

  11. #36
    Morricone on Stravinsky
    ""I adore La Simfonia Di Salme by Igor Stravinsky.I think about it every day and it effects my own work constantly .It was an honorto once briefly meet Stravinsky during reheasals at the conservatorio di Santa Cecellia. The clarity and economy of his sound appears in my music consistantly""

  12. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by flytomars View Post
    I have bought La Proprieta non epiu un Furto after Udi's recommendation and it is a killer- so diverse in melodies and moods, sounds like a horror soundtrack but in fact its actually a soundtrack of a comedy, go figure...
    Yup
    Any self respecting avant progressive fan needs to check this out
    La Proprietà Non E' Piu' Un Furto
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1jsr...gFsPgioSUrLXZY

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by AncientChord View Post
    I think the Academy members finally realized that this great composer was long overdue for the honor. To me Ennio Morricone is a living God of music, and in my life there is no greater composer of music for films. BRAVO, MAESTRO!
    Part of it is that his footprint in Hollywood is quite small - he works out of Rome and doesn't like to travel very far from there, mostly scores European films, speaks little English, and never tried to establish himself in the US movie industry.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Udi Koomran View Post
    Morricone on Stravinsky
    "I adore La Simfonia Di Salme by Igor Stravinsky.I think about it every day and it effects my own work constantly .It was an honor to once briefly meet Stravinsky during reheasals at the conservatorio di Santa Cecellia. The clarity and economy of his sound appears in my music consistantly"
    That's an revealing point. And now that he's mentioned it, I can definitely hear Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms in Morricone's score for The Mission.

  15. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    Part of it is that his footprint in Hollywood is quite small - he works out of Rome and doesn't like to travel very far from there, mostly scores European films, speaks little English, and never tried to establish himself in the US movie industry.
    He has done plenty of films in Holywood (more then 40 ) with directors like Don Siegel , Brian De Palma ,Oliver Stone ,John Carpenter, Bary Levinson and others
    I think
    Once Upon a Time In The West , Days of Heaven,Once Upon a Time in America,The Mission,The Untouchables,
    Last edited by Udi Koomran; 05-20-2016 at 03:37 AM.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    Part of it is that his footprint in Hollywood is quite small - he works out of Rome and doesn't like to travel very far from there, mostly scores European films, speaks little English, and never tried to establish himself in the US movie industry.
    True it is...but there's more to it. In the 60's and early 70's ALL Spaghetti Westerns were pooh-poohed across America by American film Directors and film critics. Even the ground breaking high quality films and their soundtracks by Directors like Sergio Leone, Sergio Corbucci, Giulio Petroni, Tonino Valerii and Sergio Sollima. A main reason I believe, was the damn American studios who butchered almost all of the films upon distribution, leaving the story line plots and visual melding broken, giving the impression of poor editing and plots that didn't make sense. The term Spaghetti Western was originally a laughed upon put down. The films by the said directors above, viewed in their entirety, were far ahead of their time, in many aspects, and are today considered classics. I do think that Morricone suffered the worst from being associated with those Directors at that time. EM did try to bust America with his beautiful score for Don Siegal's Two Mules for Sister Sara, and surprisingly writing the theme to the American Western TV series, The Men from Shiloh. But he was turned-off by the American attitude. Thankfully the times have finally caught up in the appreciation of the top Italian Westerns, and the glorious music that blossomed from Ennio Morricone, and influenced so many other film composers.
    Last edited by AncientChord; 05-20-2016 at 03:39 AM.
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  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    That's an revealing point. And now that he's mentioned it, I can definitely hear Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms in Morricone's score for The Mission.
    Undoubtedly an influence, however Morricone's mastering of perfect melodic lines and sound effects for literally any visual context or story line have no parallels, imo - and will not have - amongst the so called avant-garde classical composers. Besides, there are also clearly other influences, as we can feel in Once Upon a Time in the West for instance - I find on it a Late-Baroque & Classical era's 'flare', obviously not without Morricone giving to it completely his own voice. I reckon that his craftsmanship and inventiveness are absolutely on par with the classical masters of those times.

    This is my favourite excerpt from 66' 'La Resa Dei Conti', he applies here such an intense sense of drama by those actually beautiful melodies brilliantly arranged for orchestra.

    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  18. #43
    Member Rick Robson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    Part of it is that his footprint in Hollywood is quite small - he works out of Rome and doesn't like to travel very far from there, mostly scores European films, speaks little English, and never tried to establish himself in the US movie industry.
    Sure two things that probably helped his career and reputation in the long run, he's proved to be an influence and inspiration to the world’s most successful film music composers.
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Udi Koomran View Post
    He has done plenty of films in Hollywood (more then 40) with directors like Don Siegel, Brian De Palma, ,Oliver Stone, John Carpenter, Barry Levinson, and others. I think Once Upon a Time In The West, Days of Heaven, Once Upon a Time in America, The Mission, The Untouchables,
    Quite a few of those were with European directors, though.

    But I think the real reason he won no Oscars might have been that he had no "presence" in Hollywood. He had few professional friends there, didn't make the round of parties, didn't speak the language, and lived half the world away. He wasn't a "Hollywood guy", whereas John Williams (for example) was. Also, he didn't "write to picture" - he just came up with music that fit the mood, and the director put it where it seemed to work, which wasn't Hollywood practice.


    Quote Originally Posted by AncientChord View Post
    True it is...but there's more to it. In the 60's and early 70's ALL Spaghetti Westerns were pooh-poohed across America by American film Directors and film critics. Even the ground breaking high quality films and their soundtracks by Directors like Sergio Leone, Sergio Corbucci, Giulio Petroni, Tonino Valerii and Sergio Sollima. A main reason I believe, was the damn American studios who butchered almost all of the films upon distribution, leaving the story line plots and visual melding broken, giving the impression of poor editing and plots that didn't make sense. The term Spaghetti Western was originally a laughed upon put down.
    Also because they tended to be weird, ironic, and made black-humored commentary upon the heroic narrative of the American Western. There were no heroes.

  20. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    But I think the real reason he won no Oscars might have been that he had no "presence" in Hollywood. He had few professional friends there, didn't make the round of parties, didn't speak the language, and lived half the world away. He wasn't a "Hollywood guy", whereas John Williams (for example) was. Also, he didn't "write to picture" - he just came up with music that fit the mood, and the director put it where it seemed to work, which wasn't Hollywood practice..
    Anyway you look at this the fact he was never awarded says more about Hollywood then about him

    "he just came up with music that fit the mood,"

    His work with Sergio Leone is one of the most successful collaborations between director and composer - Leone trusted him to a point he let him compose the music before shooting and often let the actors use the music for inspiration prior to the shooting ( as with Robert De Niro) then shot the scenes while playing the music and this resulted in timeless scene good example is The Rush Of Gold and the final dual on The Good The Bad and The Ugly

  21. #46
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    One person that hasn't yet come up, and needs to: That gentleman having the great name of Alessandro Alessandroni.

    On the early Morricone scores, he was:

    - the whistler.

    - an occasional vocal soloist, specializing in unusual stylings.

    - an occasional player of the twangy and distorted electric guitar.

    - the founder and conductor of the "Cantori Moderni" choir.

    - and he may have originated many of the odd musical effects that Morricone put to such good use.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Udi Koomran View Post
    Anyway you look at this the fact he was never awarded says more about Hollywood then about him

    "he just came up with music that fit the mood,"

    His work with Sergio Leone is one of the most successful collaborations between director and composer - Leone trusted him to a point he let him compose the music before shooting and often let the actors use the music for inspiration prior to the shooting ( as with Robert De Niro) then shot the scenes while playing the music and this resulted in timeless scene good example is The Rush Of Gold and the final dual on The Good The Bad and The Ugly
    It's truly amazing work. As you say, 'The Ecstasy Of Gold' with Tuco frantically running around in the graveyard and then the huge final showdown, 'The Trio', represent arguably Leone and Morricone's best ever moment as a team.

    Yes, critics loathed these films at the time. But with both Leone's and Sam Peckinpah's films, there's a sense of the Western being taken about as far as it can go.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baribrotzer View Post
    One person that hasn't yet come up, and needs to: That gentleman having the great name of Alessandro Alessandroni.

    On the early Morricone scores, he was:

    - the whistler.

    - an occasional vocal soloist, specializing in unusual stylings.

    - an occasional player of the twangy and distorted electric guitar.

    - the founder and conductor of the "Cantori Moderni" choir.

    - and he may have originated many of the odd musical effects that Morricone put to such good use.
    Yes! It was Morricone, Alessandroni, and Sergio Leone that created the music of the Italian Western. Here is a recent photo of the two old friends. Click on the photo to enlarge. Sadly Leone never saw the recognition he now has.

    ea12027760_990166271035542_430238545510713314_n.jpg
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  24. #49
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    I spun "Good, Bad, Ugly" soundtrack while doing a virtual "trip" in the Grand Canyon today on Google Maps. Geeky, but fun as hell! The perfect soundtrack to experience that exquisite scenery. Gotta make it there some day for the real deal.

    Start here and just follow the path https://www.google.com/maps/@36.0534...8i6656!5m1!1e4

  25. #50

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