Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 44 of 44

Thread: Golden Earring

  1. #26
    Nope, it was this one, Winter Harvest

    https://www.discogs.com/Golden-Earri...elease/1928633
    "Always ready with the ray of sunshine"

  2. #27
    From Barry Hay's 1972 solo album, Only Parrots, Frogs & Angels

    "Always ready with the ray of sunshine"

  3. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by strawberrybrick View Post
    From Barry Hay's 1972 solo album, Only Parrots, Frogs & Angels
    A great album that has become quite a rarity nowadays.
    Macht das ohr auf!

    COSMIC EYE RECORDS

  4. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by spacefreak View Post
    A great album that has become quite a rarity nowadays.
    Seen it on vinyl in some webshops, for a resonable price.

    The CD seems to be very expensive.

  5. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Rarebird View Post
    Seen it on vinyl in some webshops, for a resonable price.

    The CD seems to be very expensive.
    I just bought a LP reissue for $11 from Amazon.
    "Always ready with the ray of sunshine"

  6. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Rarebird View Post
    Seen it on vinyl in some webshops, for a resonable price.

    The CD seems to be very expensive.
    There is a recent vinyl reissue I didn't know it existed... The original has been a tough find (at a reasonable price) since the 00s.
    Macht das ohr auf!

    COSMIC EYE RECORDS

  7. #32
    Member Big Ears's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    On the Stones of Years
    Posts
    151
    I cannot think of many better albums than Moontan, as long as it has this tracklist:

    Side One
    1. Radar Love
    2. Candy's Going Bad
    3. Vanilla Queen

    Side Two
    4. Big Tree, Blue Sea
    5. Are You Receiving Me

    This version replaces Just Like Vince Taylor and Suzy Lunacy for Big Tree, originally on the earlier Golden Earring aka Wall of Dolls album. My guess is the Vince Taylor and Suzy Lunacy tracklist was the first to be released in the Netherlands, but would be interested to hear confirmation from the Dutch members on this site.

    Vince Taylor is not a bad track and was improved on the first Live album, but I can do without Suzy Lunacy. Another of my assumptions is that Big Tree was used as a replacement to attract British and American hard rock fans. Both versions of Moontan have been labelled UK/European/US at various stages and depending on the format. Suffice to say, I bought my copy with the above tracklist, soon after the time of release, in the UK (HMV in Oxford Street 1974).

    Problems occurred with the original dancing girl album cover in the US. By the time the album was available in Britain on CD, it had the horrible earring cover, but with the Big Tree tracklist.

    The first Live album takes Earring's best tracks and expands them with two guitars, making it an outstanding live album. It is a great shame that Eelco Gelling fell out with the band, as he boosted the emphasis on guitars. The excellent Contraband also appeared around this time. Following Gelling's departure, they tended to revert to shorter songs, possibly with one eye on the American market. Their best post golden-era album imo was Bloody Buccaneers, released when grunge inspired a hard rock revival.

    On the subject of solo albums, George Kooymans' Jojo is worth hearing, if you are a Golden Earring fan. The follow-up single to Radar Love in GB was Instant Poetry. It is almost as good, but drew predictably negative reviews and failed to chart.

    Of all the albums in my collection, Moontan is the one to which I have kept returning - for over forty years!
    Member since Wednesday 09.09.09

  8. #33
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    in a cosmic jazzy-groove around Brussels
    Posts
    4,289
    Quote Originally Posted by Big Ears View Post

    The first Live album takes Earring's best tracks and expands them with two guitars, making it an outstanding live album. It is a great shame that Eelco Gelling fell out with the band, as he boosted the emphasis on guitars. The excellent Contraband also appeared around this time. Following Gelling's departure, they tended to revert to shorter songs, possibly with one eye on the American market. Their best post golden-era album imo was Bloody Buccaneers, released when grunge inspired a hard rock revival.
    I also prefer the Big Tree version of Moontan (good thing they re-released that song with double the length of the one on Walls Of Dolls, too)
    Yes, that first live album is stellar, but it's kind of a shame they didn't release one before (around the Seven Tears or Wall Of Dolls time would've been best)

    It's kind of lucky they released that live album after a particularly good album (Contraband) and feature songs from their newest, because to be honest, I could never really get into Switch and To The Hilt
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  9. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    It's kind of lucky they released that live album after a particularly good album (Contraband) and feature songs from their newest, because to be honest, I could never really get into Switch and To The Hilt
    Funny, TTH is perhaps my favourite album of theirs. It’s certainly one of their most prog-sounding albums, thanks a lot to the heavy presence of R. J. Stips (Supersister) on keys.

    Contraband is meat & potatoes Earrings. I think it’s kind of a mixed bag songwise, but I really like what Eelco Gelling brings to the table (especially that juicy slide guitar). And “Mad Love’s Comin’” might very well be their best ever song; what a riff!
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

  10. #35
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    California USA
    Posts
    99
    Quote Originally Posted by spacefreak View Post
    For me the s/t (aka "Wall of Dolls") is their best album. Then "Seven Tears", "Moontan", "Together", "To the Hilt", side A of "Eight Miles High" and 2/3 of "Switch".
    Pretty much my take on them as well.

  11. #36
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    in a cosmic jazzy-groove around Brussels
    Posts
    4,289
    Quote Originally Posted by spacefreak View Post
    For me the s/t (aka "Wall of Dolls") is their best album. Then "Seven Tears", "Moontan", "Together", "To the Hilt", side A of "Eight Miles High" and 2/3 of "Switch".
    I used to think WoD was their best, and it would still be if Big Tree was the length of the version on Moontan...

    However, I could never get into Together (something's not working on that one) so I'd squeak in Contraband in its place and invert 8MH (the whole album) and TTH in the order
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from drug-addicts to complete nutcases.

  12. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Progbear View Post
    TTH is perhaps my favourite album of theirs. Itís certainly one of their most prog-sounding albums, thanks a lot to the heavy presence of R. J. Stips (Supersister) on keys.
    Listening to it right now, and while I'm not exactly sure I'd call it "prog-sounding", Stips' keys make the world for the setup which was - for whatever reason - much thinner here than on albums like Moontan. The best example is probably how his synths add a world of dimension to a typically rootsy Earring-ballad like "Facedancer". It actually gets almost pretty! Of course, there were famously always 'layers' to those apparent trivial and/or obvious lyrics of Hay's.

    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  13. #38
    Member Staun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    1,672
    I liked Switch, but by the time Hole came out, there was certainly a change.
    The older I get, the better I was.

  14. #39
    Ordinary Idiot Superfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    281
    I've been a huge fan ever since Moontan came out. I have the original vinyl with the 'naked' cover, and also one called Hearing Earring that was written in brail. Here's my CD collection of their work...minus just a few.

    IMG_1141.jpg
    "The Bill of Rights says nothing about the freedom of hearing. This, of course, takes a lot of the fun out of the freedom of speech." - Pat Paulsen

    My Art- http://www.facebook.com/williamallenrenfro -My Life

  15. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Listening to it right now, and while I'm not exactly sure I'd call it "prog-sounding", Stips' keys make the world for the setup which was - for whatever reason - much thinner here than on albums like Moontan. The best example is probably how his synths add a world of dimension to a typically rootsy Earring-ballad like "Facedancer". It actually gets almost pretty! Of course, there were famously always 'layers' to those apparent trivial and/or obvious lyrics of Hay's.

    It helps that this song already has some beef. George Kooymans’ (acoustic!) guitar riff is to die for!
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

  16. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by Staun View Post
    I liked Switch, but by the time Hole came out, there was certainly a change.
    Zaragon featured two cuts from Switch on his listening/commentary channel a while back:
    "Everyone is complacent. The only time they ever speak up is to shame you for not being as complacent as them." - Adam Robillard, YouTube

  17. #42
    Member davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Kentuckiana
    Posts
    269
    I saw them once at the Spectrum in Philadelphia. Seats were on the side of stage left. GE was great, but they opened for Aerosmith; this was the show where Steven Tyler was hit by a thrown bottle. Aerosmith weren't on stage long.

  18. #43
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    The Planet Lovetron
    Posts
    7,629
    Quote Originally Posted by davis View Post
    I saw them once at the Spectrum in Philadelphia. Seats were on the side of stage left. GE was great, but they opened for Aerosmith; this was the show where Steven Tyler was hit by a thrown bottle. Aerosmith weren't on stage long.
    Was Steven dressed like Santa Claus?

  19. #44
    Member Guitarplyrjvb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Northeast Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    718
    George Kooymans is a very good and underrated guitarist.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •