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Thread: Name a few songs that exemplify early Kraut Rock...

  1. #1
    Member Mythos's Avatar
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    Name a few songs that exemplify early Kraut Rock...

    Here's a few to start:

    Hallo Gallo: Neu (1st release)

    Stumbling over Melted Moonlight: Amon Duul II (Tanz der Lemminge)

    Future Days: Can (Future Days)

    Echo Waves: Ash Ra Tempel (Inventions for an Electric Guitar)

    Ruckzuck: Kraftwerk (1st)

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    Member Rick Robson's Avatar
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    Outraged bystander markwoll's Avatar
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    "I've Got My Car and My TV" or perhaps "It's a Rainy Day (Sunshine Girl)" from Faust (So Far)
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  4. #4
    Why Don't You Eat Carrots - Faust (clear album)
    Lieber Herr Deutschland - Faust - The Last LP
    Lila Engel - Neu - Neu 2
    Gomorrha - Can - Limited Edition
    Reise Durch Ein Brennendes Gehirn (Journey Through A Burning Brain) - Tangerine Dream - Electronic Meditation
    Henriette Krötenschwanz - Amon Düül II - Phallus Dei

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    Orange Tick Squasher Buddhabreath's Avatar
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    I'll throw in a couple of favs:

    • Aumgn - Can
    • Through the Moods - Agitation Free
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  7. #7
    Agitation Free: “Malesch”
    Amon Düül II: “Restless-Skylight-Transistor-Child”
    Ash Ra Tempel: “Traummaschine”
    Can: “Pinch”
    Dom: “Edge of Time”
    Gila: “Kommunikation”
    Tangerine Dream: “Birth of Liquid Plejades”

    Quote Originally Posted by markwoll View Post
    "I've Got My Car and My TV" or perhaps "It's a Rainy Day (Sunshine Girl)" from Faust (So Far)
    “It’s a Rainy Day, Sunshine Girl” is brilliant. I like the way it starts off with a ludicrously skeletal drumbeat and gradually adds more and more layers.
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  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Mythos View Post
    Here's a few to start:

    Future Days: Can (Future Days)

    Echo Waves: Ash Ra Tempel (Inventions for an Electric Guitar)
    These are both great, but hardly *early* krautrock - which would to my ears rather be stuff from the period 1969-72 exclusively.

    I'd pick the following:

    Can - "Mary So Contrary"
    Tangerine Dream - "Journey Through a Burning Brain"
    Organisation - "Noitasinagro"
    Gila - "Kommunikation"
    Popol Vuh - "In den Gärten Pharaos"
    Nine Days' Wonder - "Moss Had Come"
    Ikarus - "The Raven"
    Hanuman - "Sonnenaufgang"
    Embryo - "Time"
    Frumpy - "Duty"
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  9. #9
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    Amon Duul - "Snow Your Thirst and Sun Your Open Mouth"

    Amon Duul II - "Archangel's Thunderbird"

    But there's really no such thing as a typical Krautrock song, IMO.

  10. #10
    Early krautrock? For me limited up to 1969.

    My take:
    CAN "Father Cannot Yell"
    AMON DUUL "Ein Wunderhübsches Mädchen Träumt von Sandosa"
    AMON DUUL 2 "Kanaan"
    Wolfgang DAUNER QUINTET "Dig My Girl"
    CHAPARALL ELECTRIC SOUND Inc. "Hallucination"
    CHECKPOINT CHARLIE "Geschichte Von Herrn Müller (parts I & II)"
    Friedrich GULDA "Meditation"
    HUMAN BEING "Untitled impro pieces"
    INNER SPACE "Kamera Song"
    LIMBUS 3 "New-Atlantis (Islands Near Utopia)"
    Irene SCHWEIZER "Sun Love"
    TANGERINE DREAM "Journey Through a Burning Brain"
    TECHNICAL SPACE COMPOSERS CREW "Canaxis"
    TRIKOLON "In Search of the Sun"
    XHOL CARAVAN "Raise Up High"
    Last edited by spacefreak; 12-21-2015 at 03:37 AM.
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    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    The two first Kraan albums (1972)?

  12. #12
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    But there's really no such thing as a typical Krautrock song, IMO.
    This is very true -- the label "Krautrock" was only applied after-the-fact, and most bands hated the label. Unlike, say, Canterbury where a lot of bands shared musicians and developed a sort of shared aesthetic, the German bands of the seventies all sound completely different from one another.

  13. #13
    Jean-Herve Peron of Faust gives an expalnation before Faust launch into.....'Krautrock'


  14. #14
    I see no mention of Cluster, but Cluster II would be a great place to start.
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    Was krautrock an actual style? Or was it just an umbrella term for all German underground music of the period?

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by PeterG View Post
    Was krautrock an actual style? Or was it just an umbrella term for all German underground music of the period?
    The term arose - again rather retroactively, although it was in use by the mid-70s - from the opening piece on Faust IV in 1974. It has essentially been interpreted as denoting either a) progressive/underground/art rock with a slant that's considered somewhat "characteristically German", or b) progressive/underground/art rock of ALL configurations from West Germany in the 70s.

    Defining names: Can, Neu!, Faust, Tangerine Dream, Amon Düül II, Popol Vuh, Kraftwerk, Kluster/Cluster, Ash Ra Tempel, Agitation Free, Guru Guru. This is quite a diverse and disparate list, so the answer is no; it was never a "sound", rather an epochal phenomenon in German rock music development.
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    Thanks SS, thought so, as I could never make genre buddies out of Kraftverk and Amon Duul II.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    so the answer is no; it was never a "sound", rather an epochal phenomenon in German rock music development.
    I agree. The term krautrock was an early 70s interpretatin of how british music journalists regarded rock music from Germany. I think attributed by somebody in Melody Maker (as the term spaghetti rock for italian bands that fortunately didn't stick). It covered a wide range of sounds, and I always used it that way; to categorise a uniquely german cultural phenomenon. Bands like Sparifankal, Lied Des Teufels, Ton Steine Scherben, Checkpoint Charlie, Hanuman, Ihre Kinder, Emma Myldenberger, certainly deserve to be included under that umbrella.
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  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by spacefreak View Post
    Bands like Sparifankal, Lied Des Teufels, Ton Steine Scherben, Checkpoint Charlie, Hanuman, Ihre Kinder, Emma Myldenberger, certainly deserve to be included under that umbrella.
    These are all very solid groups, but interestingly they all possess some asset which seems to render them inaccessible to most listeners from outside the "box". Lied des Teufels and Hanuman, Ihre Kinder, Eulenspygel, Prof. Wolfff, Floh de Cologne, Oktober and Ton Steine Scherben (who were actually quite famous in West Germany from the mid-70s on) - these bands might have appealed to a larger "prog" audience if it wasn't for the creeky German vocals, the overt radical political messages, the tendency to freakout etc. An album like Geyer Symphonie by Floh de Cologne seems to scare even the usual 'kraut hipsters' away - which is probably just as well...
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  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    An album like Geyer Symphonie by Floh de Cologne seems to scare even the usual 'kraut hipsters' away - which is probably just as well...
    It may seem strange but before the days of the krautrock "revival" of the 90s, when around the genre were more dedicated listeners, I often saw Floh de Cologne mentioned in articles concerning rock in Germany alongside with other "curiosities" as Embryo, Checkpoint Charlie, Moira etc. It's bands like Oktober or Locomotive Kreuzeberg or Ougenweide, that never showed-up. Probably not so obvious references.
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  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by strawberrybrick View Post
    I see no mention of Cluster, but Cluster II would be a great place to start.
    Also named Cluster '71 - yes, that's a great one! Although there's not much "rock" to be found there... These were all sounds from audio generators and primitive synthesizers, noise filters and radio frequencies etc. But very few early kraut records illustrate the organic link between this movement and the serious contemporary musique-concrete of the day (Darmstadt school et al.).
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  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by spacefreak View Post
    It's bands like Oktober or Locomotive Kreuzeberg or Ougenweide, that never showed-up. Probably not so obvious references.
    Absolutely true. I think it basically took until the early 2000s for anyone to even realize that there'd actually been a vibrant cosmic folk scene in West Germany as part of the 'krautrock' phenomenon. All of a sudden there were demands and reprints of Emtidi, Bröselmaschine, Kalacakra, Witthüser & Westrupp, Langsyne, (the first) Ougenweide, Emma Myldenberger, Hölderlin's Traum etc. Funny how things work.
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  23. #23
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    Kraan isnt often mentioned either, allthough the first two albums smells of kraut.
    The 'genre' is not that broad since the rest of their albums isnt considered kraut. Neither does Guru Guru or Munju, a.o.
    Kraut is not a sound or a style or even a genre - but there must be something?
    Atypical compositions, no use of cliches or elements from known defined genres? Dunno...

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Zeuhlmate View Post
    Atypical compositions, no use of cliches or elements from known defined genres? Dunno...
    I'd say a central component would be the apparency of "free" approaches to form, substance, improvisaton, composition etc. Of course it's all relative; while many of the pieces that ended up on those classic Can albums were certainly founded in lengthy studio workouts, the final outcome was usually so meticulously post-processed that they sounded like fully formed, large-scale works. "Halleluwah" and "Bel Air" are excellent examples of this. The music on Faust's albums was allegedly far more planned and pre-conceptualized than traditional lore would have it, and this is audible on revisits. Even Ash Ra Tempel would play off graphic scores.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    I'd say a central component would be the apparency of "free" approaches to form, substance, improvisaton, composition etc.
    Exactly. And these are the main reasons that bands of diverse subgenres of rock, as for example the hard rocking Silberbart, for me are worthy of the krautrock label. Rating: Out of the ordinary!
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