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Thread: Jethro Tull albums after Stormwach- How do you rate them?

  1. #26
    Member TheH's Avatar
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    Broadsword was my very first Tull Album and I love to death. It was very much the reason for me to become a Tull fan
    and played it's role for me getting into Prog.

    Does it sound like classic Tull, no it doesn't. But what's wrong with that? (I think it's one of their best)

    Just look at the amazing amount of quality leftovers from that sessions. It could have been a triple Album with hardly any fillers!

    I never was much into A, I really just like Black Sunday, I think it's ok though.

    Under Wraps was a let down as I bought it. I think there is more substance to it as it appeard at first. I really enjoyed most of what was
    played live on that tour.

    I think Crest Of A Knave is a good Album, just more Dire Straits than Tull.

    Rock and Catfish didn't impress me very much, rather average but better than a lot of other stuff.

    I can't remember anything from Dot Com or Roots. I think I thought something like "if that's it, you should have better stopped." back then.
    I'm amazed about all the love for Roots here, so I will have to revisit it again.

    Never heard the Christmas Album though. (I hate Christmas Albums)

    P.S. Honary mention to Coronach for being my favorite track of that time.

  2. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Garden Dreamer View Post
    As much as I love Tull, nothing after Heavy Horses is essential to me. Much of it is Jethro Dull.
    The perpetual presence of Ian Anderson and Martin Barre plus the uninterrupted flow of albums and tours can make it seem as if Tull's changes were more integrated and more about changing times than anything else than they actually were, especially to people who didn't live through the era.

    IMO, Tull's main '70s band (which started with Thick as a Brick (or Aqualung, if one prefers) and which ended with Stormwatch and everybody getting fired in 1979), was where Jethro Tull the progressive rock band's story is really told and it represents that band's creative arc.

    After that, it wasn't the same band. If in fact it should even be called a band. The subsequent period represented an attempt to keep the name of the band alive, but IMO a lot of continuity was broken when the band split occurred in 1979. It all starts with the rhythm section, and most everything made under the Tull name since 1980 traded the rhythmic complexities of the (especially mid and late) '70s band for a much more standard rock band style drum and bass. Of course there were exceptions here and there, but I think that the newer personnel wasn't always right for the moment when those exceptions occurred. And the drum machines weren't right for any of the moments. I understand that IA was going for different things, but when you take the changes in purpose and changes in personnel in sum, you get very different bands.

    As I said earlier, all of these albums have songs that I like on them, but almost none of them have songs that I would use as references if someone wanted me give examples of why I like the band.

    Also, on the '90s albums I really lost a lot of interest in much of Ian Anderson's lyrics.
    Last edited by Facelift; 12-14-2015 at 06:17 PM.

  3. #28
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    For me and others that was kind of the end of the Barriemore Barlow, Glascock, Evans, Hammond, Palmer era, which in retrospect, sure left quite a legacy of great music behind them.
    'A' is a completely different animal for Tull, a new, one time line up, that blended the best of Eddie Jobson's key and violin, a great fusion drummer in Mark Craney, the introduction of ex-Fairport bassist Dave Pegg. Broadsword is a challenging record, with even more line up changes, very short songs(For tull anyway), and some weird electronica on some of the songs, this is where I kind of got away from the band, every record after that was like the same thing over and over, no more manic prog moves, or experimentation. Not until .com, which had some positive energy. But considering what the band has done through it's career, it's quite an impressive discography over all.

  4. #29
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StevegSr View Post
    For my own two cents, I place RtB right after MitG, with the folk trilogies following RtB. There's something about those eastern rhythms and Arabic scales that really moves me.
    Not sure I'd place MitG before SFTW & HH, but yeah, rtB is right up there after the first six albums (incl LitP)
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from heroin-addicts to crazy ones

  5. #30
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    The only ones I own:

    Crest Of A Knave: I still think this is a really strong release from Tull. A different style for sure and somewhat of it’s time, but I like pretty much all of it.

    Catfish Rising: I have mixed feelings on this one. There are some great tracks, but some rather mediocre ones too. Some of the lyrics kind of have Ian coming across like a dirty old man, which did not really work for me. I always liked the final track “When Jesus Came To Play”. I saw the tour and it was a cool show. Probably the last time I have seen Anderson when his voice was still in pretty decent shape.

    .Com: Another mixed bag. Some good tracks and some pure dreck. Like other have mentioned, what the hell was he thinking with “Hot Mango Flush”.

  6. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    The only ones I own:

    Crest Of A Knave: I still think this is a really strong release from Tull. A different style for sure and somewhat of it’s time, but I like pretty much all of it.

    Catfish Rising: I have mixed feelings on this one. There are some great tracks, but some rather mediocre ones too. Some of the lyrics kind of have Ian coming across like a dirty old man, which did not really work for me. I always liked the final track “When Jesus Came To Play”. I saw the tour and it was a cool show. Probably the last time I have seen Anderson when his voice was still in pretty decent shape.

    .Com: Another mixed bag. Some good tracks and some pure dreck. Like other have mentioned, what the hell was he thinking with “Hot Mango Flush”.
    I could be wrong, but I thought the "he" for Hot Mango Flush was Martin Barre, not Ian Anderson. In any event, I think it's one of the better songs on the album. It's the title track on that album that I really can't stand.

  7. #32
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    1. Catfish Rising
    2. Rock Island
    3. Christmas Album
    4. Roots to Branches
    5. Dot.Com
    6. Crest of a Knave
    7. A
    8. Broadsword & the Beast
    9. Under Wraps
    ( the last 4 I revisited about 10 or 12 years ago) Dot Com is not very impressive, on the par to Roots. Big difference. Catfish Rising is absolute fave. At last they reproduced recognizable sound. Great songs. I loved the album from the first listen, and I consider this one a classic JT, revisit pretty often. Rock Island is good, but not as fresh, as CR, and a bit "80s' production there. I wholly recommend the wonderful Christmas Album to all who hadn't yet own this one. Magical album, I have a tradition since 2003 to put it on every Christmas eve.
    Last edited by grego; 12-14-2015 at 07:59 PM.

  8. #33
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    I'm gonna play Dot.com again tonight. That album rocks.

  9. #34
    Member Vic2012's Avatar
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    Hunt By Numbers

  10. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Vic2012 View Post
    Hunt By Numbers
    I love these tracks:

    Dotcom
    Awol
    Wicked windows
    Far Alaska
    Dog ear years
    Trickles down

    Some of the bands best stuff since the early 80s

  11. #36
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    Two of that bunch make my top five
    1. Songs from the Wood
    2. Christmas Album
    3. Benefit
    4. Heavy Horses
    5. Roots to Branches

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterG View Post
    Two of that bunch make my top five
    1. Songs from the Wood
    2. Christmas Album
    3. Benefit
    4. Heavy Horses
    5. Roots to Branches
    Let the record show:
    6. Aqualung
    7. Stormwatch
    8. Broadsword
    9. Warchild
    10. Crest

  13. #38
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    As much as I love HH and SFTW, I've never warmed up to Stormwatch. It just never connects with me. The standouts to me are Crest and Roots. Those are the ones I listen to most. Of course, this time of year brings out the Christmas album for a few spins.

  14. #39
    Too old and Warchild eras have moved up from the lower ranked albums to pretty much equal with horses, songs, storm, benefit, passion eras. Songs such as strip cartoon, salamander ragtime, commercial traveller, small cigar orchestral, good godmother, glory row, March the mad scientist, saturation etc have completely changed my thoughts of the bands capabilities and their album objective in those 2 years.

  15. #40
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterG View Post
    Two of that bunch make my top five
    1. Songs from the Wood
    2. Christmas Album
    3. Benefit
    4. Heavy Horses
    5. Roots to Branches
    that's kind of provocative really

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterG View Post
    Let the record show:
    6. Aqualung
    7. Stormwatch
    8. Broadsword
    9. Warchild
    10. Crest
    that's even more provocative (nothing pre-72 in the top 10)
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from heroin-addicts to crazy ones

  16. #41
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    Crest Of A Knave- ****
    Rock Island- ***
    Catfish Rising- **
    Roots To Branches- *****
    Dot.Com- **
    The JT Christmas Album- *** (hey it's Christmas time- go for it if you don't have it yet)

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    that's kind of provocative really



    that's even more provocative (nothing pre-72 in the top 10)
    eeerrr...really? Benefit came out in 70 and Aqualung in 71. You must be reading the discography of another band

    I won't apologise for my musical preferences!
    Hate is too strong a word but I really REALLY dislike, and I mean dislike with a vengeance:
    This Was
    Stand Up
    Passion Play
    TAAB
    Minstrel.

    Aqualung, Benefit and War Child are the only pre-75 albums I like

  18. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by PeterG View Post
    Hate is too strong a word but I really REALLY dislike, and I mean dislike with a vengeance:
    This Was
    Stand Up
    Passion Play
    TAAB
    Minstrel.
    Interesting. How come?

  19. #44
    Well I'm going to force myself to listen to that DVD the produce guy gave me, starting with Stormwatch and working my way through all the albums. Just got through Stormwatch... not bad, but as I mentioned earlier, not essential. I hear some traces of song styles that harken to the previous two albums.

    I'm not holding out much hope for the rest though. I've tried to get through these albums before and found myself hitting the "skip" button midway through a song too many times...
    "Moustache stays right where it's at" - Clutch

  20. #45
    I thought A, Broadsword..., Under Wraps, and Crest... were all good records. I've noticed a lot of people talking about "struggling" with the synths and drum machines on Under Wraps, but I'm fine with it. But then I was always a synth pop fan anyway. I know Ian said in the liner notes of the remastered edition that he had wished there had been live drumming on that record instead of the drum machine. But I think those are all respectable albums, given the era and how far into their career Tull was at that time. And it just cracks me up every time I hear someone gripe about Crest Of The Knave winning the Best Hard Rock/Heavy Metal Grammy that one year, as if the Grammy people handing out awards to the wrong records was anything new (it had been going on since the 60's, when Nino Tempo and April Steven won for Best Rock & Roll Record of 1963).

  21. #46
    ...I'm on to A and Broadsword now, again some good moments but nothing essential... and too many tunes where the chorus is just the song title repeated over and over... HOWEVER... the Tull collection that guy burned for me 10 years ago was NOT the versions with the bonus tunes. I just checked out Broadsword on Youtube and am listening to the bonus tunes. I like a few of these much better than the album! "Jack Frost and the Hooded Crow" , "Jack A Lynn" and "Mayhem Maybe" sound like they were recorded during the Songs from the Wood or Minstrel era. The remaining songs sound like outtakes from the Broadsword album as they all have the same instrumental and vocal sound, and as such don't do anything for me.
    "Moustache stays right where it's at" - Clutch

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sputnik View Post
    Interesting. How come?
    This Was - I don't like the biscuit tin, backyard blues, raw pastiche throwback style of music at all. I think it is awful.
    Stand Up- one word Bouree, can't stand that kind of stuff. I really dislike the folk-blues-dinner jazz feel of this album.
    TAAB- I know its a classic and a beloved LP for many on here. But for me, it is just a dirge of ever changing sounds and styles and non-sensical lyrics.
    Passion Play - See comment for TAAB.
    Minstrel - sonically too harsh and the "pastiche" melodies aren't my cup of tea at all. Not to mention the talking in places.

  23. #48
    My ranking:

    1.Roots to Branches
    2.Dot Com
    3.Crest of A Knave
    4.Broadsword and the Beast
    5.A
    6.Rock Island
    7.Christmas Album
    8.Catfish Rising
    9.Under Wraps

  24. #49
    I found Heavy Horses to be their last truly great record, so I haven't kept any of the later ones - although I've owned most of them and heard them all. I believe I also got rid of Too Old, Bursting Out and several others. With those 'big six' it became all about keeping the titles that I wanted to play and hear, and tho' there have been times when I've felt like pulling out a long lost album (be it with either of those 'big' names, of whom KC are the only ones whose 'classics' I've conserved in total), I've never really caught myself actually missing any of them.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  25. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    I found Heavy Horses to be their last truly great record, so I haven't kept any of the later ones - although I've owned most of them and heard them all. I believe I also got rid of Too Old, Bursting Out and several others. With those 'big six' it became all about keeping the titles that I wanted to play and hear, and tho' there have been times when I've felt like pulling out a long lost album (be it with either of those 'big' names, of whom KC are the only ones whose 'classics' I've conserved in total), I've never really caught myself actually missing any of them.
    Same here. Got rid of all Yes and Rush albums as well that weren't 4-5 stars on my scale. Just part of the "downsizing" of life. Didn't find myself missing any of it either.
    "Moustache stays right where it's at" - Clutch

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