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Thread: Italian pop - mid 60s-ish to mid 90s-ish

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    Italian pop - mid 60s-ish to mid 90s-ish

    Any other fans of Italian pop of the 60s to 90s? Especially Eurovision and light radio pop.
    I collect Italian pop on 7" singles and on 33rpm LPs. And was very surprised last week when I was in Italy (Roma & Firenze) at how expensive vinyl is for collectors. The kind of Italian pop singles I can find outside Italy for about €0.50 cents, sell for no less than 10 euros in Italy.

    I say mid-60s, because I don't collect the easy listening or dinner jazz versions of folk and traditional melodies of the early 60s nor the harmony groups of the early 60s.
    And I say mid-90s, because after about the mid-90s, having gone through techno, a lot of it (as in most countries) started to sound Fame Factory, Idol, Got Talent, X Factor manufactured i.e. it all started to sound the same.

    I love the new wavey, proggy feel of Alice and the rougher feel of Gianni and Loredana

    Here are just some of the artists in my singles collection:

    Alice
    Anna Oxa
    Franceso Napoli
    Gianni Nannini
    Gigliola Cinquetti
    Isadora
    Ricchi & Poveri
    Lucio Battisti
    Mario Tessuto
    Fausto Leali
    Bino
    Alan Sorrenti
    Claudio Baglioni
    Loredana Berte
    Roberto Soffici
    Tozzi - Raff
    Bennato & Nannini
    Riccardo Fogli
    Toto Cutugno
    Umberto Tozzi

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    Many years ago I came across a Lucio Battisti best of CD in a Tower Records cutout bin for $1. I had never heard of him before but I really liked it. Enough so to order 2 2-cd compilations from Italy (this was the early 1990s, when that wasn't easy...). Another great cutout that I found around the same time was by Ricardo Cocciante (sp?). Unofrtunately that cd turned green and stopped playing properly soon after.

    A few years later a buddy of mine moved to Italy and I recommended that he listen to some Battisti. Apparently all his co-workers were really impressed that he had heard of the guy!

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    Member interbellum's Avatar
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    I got into the work of Alice when she began working with musicians like Tony Levin.
    After that I managed to collect all her albums, although this doesn't mean I'm into Italian pop.
    One of the few others I listen to often is Andrea Chimenti.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by arturs View Post
    I recommended that he listen to some Battisti. Apparently all his co-workers were really impressed that he had heard of the guy!
    In Italy, Battisti is nothing short of a bonafide legend. Fabrizio de Andre is very well known too, but his radical political stance entitled him more of an "exotic" following, to put it like that (he was to some extent perceived as a kinda "Pasolini of pop/rock"). Interestingly, three essential Italian pop bands of the period - I Pooh, Dik Dik and I Nomadi (who are still going!) - were also at one point rather influenced by the burgeoning progressive movement of the day.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    In Italy, Battisti is nothing short of a bonafide legend.
    Exactly, he is one of the absolute greats of Italian pop.

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    Quote Originally Posted by interbellum View Post
    I got into the work of Alice when she began working with musicians like Tony Levin.
    Yea, I think I've got 4 of her albums so far. I love the way she can mix adult light pop with some deeper stuff and throw in some rock, new wave and unusual sounds and instrumentation and how she works with some of the big names in rock and prog. My favs are her 89 album "il sole nella pioggia" on which by the way she sings Peter Hamill's "Now and Forever," and her rocky new wave album from 82 "Azimut".

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    I have all 3 of the following toons on 7" single.


    My fav Italian 60s pop song is this one from 1967 with the wonderful Gigliola.


    And this white reggae hit from 79 is one of my favourites from Loredana (who, for those who don't know, used to be married to Bjorn Borg)



    This is one of my favourite songs by Gianna, she's singing about Men.

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    Here's a great one from Alice


    And here's the brilliant Anna Oxa singing over a very Police inspired track


    Going back to 67 again, here's the great Fausto Leali

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    Member interbellum's Avatar
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    Here's Alice with Japan-members Steve Jansen and Mick Karn plus Robby Aceto and Ben Coleman:


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    Member interbellum's Avatar
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    And here with Tim Bowness doing a King Crimson-cover:


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    Matia Bazar

    actually the former Prog band J.E.T. plus the drummer from Museo Rosenbach (R.I.P.) and the fantastic
    Antonella Ruggiero.



    Last edited by TheH; 11-04-2015 at 02:44 PM.

  12. #12
    Matia Bazar even revisited their prog past a time or two, not generally known.



    I love Alice and Lucio Battisti (another one with a prog connection, the first three Formula 3 albums were entirely composed by him). Ditto Gianna Nannini (and the posted tune is one of my faves of hers), Alan Sorrenti (yes, even his pop stuff) and Gigliola Cinquetti.

    Here’s a tune by Enrico Ruggeri that I’ve always liked:



    And the aforementioned Richard Cocciante (who is actually Italian/French), who had a near-miss hit single in the USA with the English version of this song:



    Also the solo works of Alberto Radius (Formula 3, Il Volo) and Mario Lavezzi (Il Volo) have their gems.
    Last edited by Progbear; 11-04-2015 at 11:15 PM.
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

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    Thanks for the Matia Bazar links guys, great stuff.

    Here's another one of my 7" singles, very catchy tune.


    I saw the new Bond film last night, so her is a clip of Monica with Eros singing at her.


    And of course, this thread would be empty without a catchy little number from Umberto

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    i could just toment this thread with square miles of dodgy italo disco tunes (yes, that's a genre of its own; there are numerous articles and papers on it), which i won't. and i am NOT going to post the video to sabrina’s “boys” ;-)>

    but alice was stunning. says this then teen and now old fogey.

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    Please do, I love dodgy Italdisco! For me the cheezier the song the better.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by iguana View Post
    i am NOT going to post the video to sabrina’s “boys” ;-)>

    but alice was stunning. says this then teen and now old fogey.
    Thx for NOT posting it (Sabrina, I mean); that video was sufficiently traumatic to a pimply juvenile back then - better not rip up those scars there. And I *WOULD* argue that her "song" is of a somewhat lower total level than the majority of tunes and artists already mentioned here.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Thx for NOT posting it (Sabrina, I mean); that video was sufficiently traumatic to a pimply juvenile back then - better not rip up those scars there. And I *WOULD* argue that her "song" is of a somewhat lower total level than the majority of tunes and artists already mentioned here.
    the only thing that made me wonder was whether her nipples really were that close to her armpits. and whether that was a … or whether i was just pleased to see her ;-)>

    anyway, you have been alerted. here's a few italo disco tunes that i’d call quite good:





    Last edited by iguana; 11-05-2015 at 08:04 AM.

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    zugabe:







    i have a theory that this led directly to the formation of THE WATCH and ASGARD as well as firm embracement of PORCUPINE TREE in italy during the following decade.

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    always liked this one:


  20. #20
    Well, since we’re going in that direction anyway, should I post the song that Nicola di Bari sang in the original Benji movie? On the other hand, I will post this, a tune that still makes me misty-eyed (and as a former classical guitar student, I approve of the backing track):



    And I have to say, I give the thumbs-up to any man willing to go out on stage wearing glasses as dorky as those!
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

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    Loving it guys! Keep 'em comin'!

  22. #22
    Mia Martini (the late sister of the aforementioned Loredana Bertè):



    Massimo Ranieri (singing in Neapolitan dialect):

    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

  23. #23
    “Che cosa sei” by Alberto Radius, using the same synth-guitar sound from his Il Volo days (I think it was an EMS Synthi-Hi-Fli):

    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

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    I'm well chuffed just now, I found my favourite Loredana Berte album (s/t from 1980) on vinyl in a charity shop today, in very good condition and for less than one euro!

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