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Thread: Who here is still releasing new music?

  1. #351
    Member The Czar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moorgladery View Post
    I wish '98 sounded more like this! Definitely can hear the Red influence. I may have that bass line stuck in my head for a while.
    Thank you! Living rent free, just how we planned. 😄 thanks for checking us out. I kind of with it was 1998 again.

  2. #352
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nijinsky Hind View Post
    I really liked this track. Great bass line and the song flows well.
    Thank you. I miss the days of being able to have the time to work on music this much, it really made a difference. Thanks for listening.

  3. #353
    Hereís one I just finished up. Iím going to stop making songs for a few months. See if I can get on a different track.
    https://bakullama1.bandcamp.com/albu...ncess-of-tisul
    Still alive and well...
    https://bakullama1.bandcamp.com/

  4. #354
    Quote Originally Posted by Nijinsky Hind View Post
    Hereís one I just finished up. Iím going to stop making songs for a few months. See if I can get on a different track.
    https://bakullama1.bandcamp.com/albu...ncess-of-tisul
    I like the slippery piano parts on this. It kind of reminds me of Jerry Goldsmithís Freud soundtrack.

  5. #355
    Member BobM's Avatar
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    Here's an ambitious song that we just released - Weather Report's "A Remark You Made" (I'm on keys)

    https://www.bandlab.com/post/fc41407...0-000d3aa5105b
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A gentleman is defined as someone who knows how to play the accordion, and doesn't.

  6. #356
    Wow, very cool playing all around! Nice job
    If you're actually reading this then chances are you already have my last album but if NOT and you're curious:
    https://battema.bandcamp.com/

    Also, Ephemeral Sun: it's a thing and we like making things that might be your thing: https://ephemeralsun.bandcamp.com

  7. #357
    Quote Originally Posted by moorgladery View Post
    I like the slippery piano parts on this. It kind of reminds me of Jerry Goldsmithís Freud soundtrack.
    I went to you tube and had a listen to Freud. 1962 wow.
    Still alive and well...
    https://bakullama1.bandcamp.com/

  8. #358
    Quote Originally Posted by BobM View Post
    Here's an ambitious song that we just released - Weather Report's "A Remark You Made" (I'm on keys)

    https://www.bandlab.com/post/fc41407...0-000d3aa5105b
    Nice.

  9. #359
    Quote Originally Posted by BobM View Post
    Here's an ambitious song that we just released - Weather Report's "A Remark You Made" (I'm on keys)

    https://www.bandlab.com/post/fc41407...0-000d3aa5105b
    Very very nice !
    Still alive and well...
    https://bakullama1.bandcamp.com/

  10. #360
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    Joined PE today.. was directed to this group, and found this thread fascinating...

    From the OP:

    I'm curious to know if anyone is still planning, or actually producing new music. I'm not talking about for fun, but for actually building a fan base and selling, yes, for money, their own music.

    My questions are:

    1. why?
    2. How do see the future of music as a commodity?
    3. Do you have second doubts about wether you're being realistic?
    4. What formats are you going to use?

    I'd really like to hear what you are honestly thinking.

  11. #361
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    I will answer these questions... from my perspective today in 2024... not from my perspective in 1993 when I started a career in music.

    1. Why? Music doesn't seem to go away. Seems to be in my blood as many others here have attested. My parents were both successful musicians. Dad sang opera in theaters and Mom was a pro trumpeter in a big band in the 1950's. Both have passed on, but the music still feels as alive as ever.

    2. I have no idea about the future of music as something to be sold. After reading through quite a bit of this thread, it seems that most everyone does not see it as a commodity anymore. I suppose I don't either, but was hoping to see some that are having some kind of reasonable success. Physical product seems to becoming a thing of the past. CDs are pretty much gone. Most people I know don't even have CD players anymore, even many musicians I know don't use them anymore. Vinyl still seems to be relevant, but it's very costly to produce. I am hearing about $15 a copy? Hard to make any money on that I suppose.

    3. As far as being realistic, I've never been realistic. I just do what I feel motivated to do, and let the rest work itself out.. for better or worse... mostly worse, but I was able to write, record, and produce an original Rock Opera in Las Vegas that found a second run in LA a few years later. It made absolutely no sense at the time to do it... but it did make some kind of impact and a lot of interesting and funny stories came from it. I think people have to take risks sometimes... even if you have serious doubts or second thoughts.

    4. What formats to use for new music? I just don't know. I really don't. I know this may sound crazy, but I have never been on Spotify or used a music streaming service other than listening to a few things on youtube.

    I've found myself back in a live band again. Hard to believe this happened as I was playing a solo gig and a drummer from another band liked was I was doing and approached me. I had a festival booked to perform solo, and invited him to join me.. just guitar and drums. It went really well, most folks loved it and we found a bassist within a week, and I knew a sax player who was down for it as well. We decided to just gig live and skip the recordings, CDs etc and just offer up a live experience only without recordings to sell. It's been an interesting strategy for us. Come see us live... that's it. No recordings.

    That being said, I did record the band on a tape machine for my own personal use over three shows and after not listening back to it until recently, I was completely shocked as to how good it actually sounded. This has led me back to this very question... do I release it on some platform or level?

  12. #362
    Though I'm not really making money with my music, exept for 2 sales on Bandcamp and I have perhaps a very small fanbase, I still hope to expand somehow. I've always wanted to make some money with my music, but I'm realistic enough it ain't gonna happen.In the past I've done some music on request and I was paid for. One piece for video-art from someone I happened to know and once 2 pieces of music as accompaniment for 2 poems by Emily Dickinson, asked for by an author and violin-teacher, who admired my music.
    I'll try to answer your questions.
    Why?
    Well, composing is the only thing I seem to have some talent for. I can't live without being creative, it's the base of my existence, just like I need food, drink and air, I need to be creative. If I have a kind of writers-block, I feel bad.
    About the future of music?
    I think it will stay in some way or another, though it has to share attention with other things. But on the other hand, those other things, like movies or games, need music as well.
    What formats?
    I still buy CDs. YouTube and perhaps Bandcamp are mostly used to discover things and I tend to listen to stuff that is released by people here. For my own music I use Bandcamp (I've I have something like an album) and SoundCloud (if I have recorded a new composition). I tend to put together an album, they way I would release it on a physical medium, if that would be possible.
    Last edited by Rarebird; 3 Weeks Ago at 08:41 AM.

  13. #363
    Quote Originally Posted by John Miner View Post
    I've found myself back in a live band again. Hard to believe this happened as I was playing a solo gig and a drummer from another band liked was I was doing and approached me. I had a festival booked to perform solo, and invited him to join me.. just guitar and drums. It went really well, most folks loved it and we found a bassist within a week, and I knew a sax player who was down for it as well. We decided to just gig live and skip the recordings, CDs etc and just offer up a live experience only without recordings to sell. It's been an interesting strategy for us. Come see us live... that's it. No recordings.

    That being said, I did record the band on a tape machine for my own personal use over three shows and after not listening back to it until recently, I was completely shocked as to how good it actually sounded. This has led me back to this very question... do I release it on some platform or level?
    Hi

    IMHO start simple with the easiest means to share the recordings, and see what happens. I would suggest uploading videos to YouTube (they don't have to be actual music videos, it could just be a song with a static image ala all the bootlegged album tracks on YT), because EVERYONE and their mother understands watching stuff on YT, even folks who aren't as familiar with the Brave New World of digital music streaming.

    Even with all their corporate turbulence of late, Bandcamp remains a godsend to artists of all sizes, but especially artists on the "small to nanoscopic" end of the spectrum. Free to start using, includes lots of great tools to work on a "community" and of course the best payments per sale. If you aren't already familiar with their platform I would strongly encourage you to do so, perhaps first just by listening to other artists or even buying just to get familiar with what they do and how they work.

    If no financial ROI but access to a far wider audience than local live shows is of interest, Spotify is certainly fine. I personally have nothing to do with Spotify as listener or artist, but I'm in a minority.
    If you're actually reading this then chances are you already have my last album but if NOT and you're curious:
    https://battema.bandcamp.com/

    Also, Ephemeral Sun: it's a thing and we like making things that might be your thing: https://ephemeralsun.bandcamp.com

  14. #364
    Member BobM's Avatar
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    I joined Distrokid 2 years ago and they helped me push out about a dozen songs to several platforms. I think they cover about 15-20 different places, like Spotify, Apple, Amazon, etc and many smaller ones too. Over those 2 years I paid their service fee (I think it was somethinbg like $20/year) and I got some plays and made some royalties to the tune of $2.50. Of course I couldn't collect that massive payday (uggh) because they charged $2.50 to send me the $2.50 I made. So this wasn't a lucrative proposition for me and I cancelled the service and those songs were removed from the platforms.

    Now if you are doing a bunch of self-promotion and you can gather a fanbase you stand a chance to make something back, but I think you really have to work on it and get thousands of plays on each published song to make back your $20. If you are playing live gigs you may do better by telling people your music is out there to be heard. Like I said, you have to promote yourself actively and not just wait for fans to find you.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A gentleman is defined as someone who knows how to play the accordion, and doesn't.

  15. #365
    Alas playing live is not an option for me, because I'm a lousy keyboardplayer. I think I've played live once, which was the experience of a lifetime, especially because I couldn't hear what I was doing, nor the backingtape I used as a basis.

  16. #366
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    It appears there have now been three stages of the music business since the onset of recorded music.

    The first was artist/record company. The artist, musician or band would seek out a label to support and distribute them.... allowing them
    to focus on their craft 100%. The % given to the artist was small, but the exposure could be huge, and if it was successful, it could work out very well for the artist and the label. Recording and album in a proper studio, pressing vinyl, tapes or 8 tracks and distributing nationally or internationally was nearly if not completely impossible for the individual entity.

    The second wave came when digital recording was made available, and artists could record on machines like ADAT then press CD's themselves and distribute them to mostly small distribution houses who would get them into Ma and Pa stores. The artist could send out their music to independent magazines and later websites that would review and get them some exposure. It wasn't impossible to make some money and move a few thousand CD's upon a release. This was the world I entered into in the 1990's. We had distribution with two distributors that covered us in Europe and North America. We would get reviewed, and genuinely welcomed by the community that was trying it's best to survive and stay somewhat relevant as the major labels were basically ignoring this genre.

    Now the third wave seems to be the elimination of physical product, and artists use the streaming platforms for better or for worse.
    I jumped ship from selling music during the Napster Kazaar era when an album we did... and I think a very good one "Tell A Vision" landed on Kazaar and was downloaded 3500 times for free, without us authorizing this and without our consent. There wasn't much we could do because the "enemy" was not know to us specifically, and we certainly did not have the money to hire a lawyer to fight for our rights as music artists or self publishers. I remember a couple of the big artists fighting this.. Metallica? etc.. not sure what came out of it.. but I saw this as a horrific thing for the musicians/artists.

    The contrarian view was that it was a good thing, the file sharing, and all the free exposure unknown artists could get across the WWW... and this was to their benefit because the whole world could hear your music with the click of a mouse. This was the ego driven, look at me, and art isn't about money anyway. This model won the battle but lost the war in my opinion.

    Phase 1 offered true pie in the sky possibilities even with a small percentage from the vast ocean.

    Phase 2 offered a realistic possibility to support your craft with a realistic business model that was like a decent % from a lake after you paid all your own expenses. It took a lot of time however outside of just making music. I think to some degree the music would suffer because the artist would just have to wear "too many hats" at once.

    Phase 3 ..... I don't really understand it personally. It appears that something like Spotify is saying "here is the huge ocean, and you can get it just like the past with that small %, but you don't have a label or team to pay... to do all the work, and you are still left up to yourself to produce product. Producing product can be cheap now... even produced on a computer without studio time or expenses there, and distribution is basically free. Your cut is very small.. but look at the possibility. You see a few pop artists doing well, and a few independents with great social media skills gathering enough likes and subscribers to make it work out ... standing out from the millions of artists who flood the network that don't have 10 hours a day to work 15 social media sites and be producing videos weekly.

    Most of the popular music I hear today sounds dreadful to my ears. Lacks creativity, production lacks dynamic, feel and nuance... especially in the rhythm sections.

    Some of the best stuff I have heard.. and I mean really good... like a fusion band that is playing amazing stuff, has 35 views on youtube, 25 followers or subscribers and is gigging every other month in some underground bar or basement a million miles from here. These are the artists that are still putting 95% of their effort into their musical craft and 5% on the social media craft.

    Just a morning rant before I drink 4 cups of coffee.

  17. #367
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobM View Post
    I joined Distrokid 2 years ago and they helped me push out about a dozen songs to several platforms. I think they cover about 15-20 different places, like Spotify, Apple, Amazon, etc and many smaller ones too. Over those 2 years I paid their service fee (I think it was somethinbg like $20/year) and I got some plays and made some royalties to the tune of $2.50. Of course I couldn't collect that massive payday (uggh) because they charged $2.50 to send me the $2.50 I made. So this wasn't a lucrative proposition for me and I cancelled the service and those songs were removed from the platforms.

    Now if you are doing a bunch of self-promotion and you can gather a fanbase you stand a chance to make something back, but I think you really have to work on it and get thousands of plays on each published song to make back your $20. If you are playing live gigs you may do better by telling people your music is out there to be heard. Like I said, you have to promote yourself actively and not just wait for fans to find you.
    Interesting post. Thanks for sharing.

    The self promotion thing can really be time consuming, and in reality it can do damage to one's personal life. Ignoring loved ones, energy away from work etc..

    To keep a quality band alive, I feel like I have to put some money in their pockets.. at least from live shows. It's just a respect thing. If we play for 2 hours, and I can give them just $50... they feel genuinely appreciated, and can rationalize it to their pod saying..."it's a paying gig". I think a good band should be at least a sustainable interest or hobby. In my opinion, this "music is free" movement is not working. The quality of the music is suffering, and it's harder and harder to keep a band together for more than a year or two.

  18. #368
    Quote Originally Posted by John Miner View Post
    Most of the popular music I hear today sounds dreadful to my ears. Lacks creativity, production lacks dynamic, feel and nuance... especially in the rhythm sections.

    Some of the best stuff I have heard.. and I mean really good... like a fusion band that is playing amazing stuff, has 35 views on youtube, 25 followers or subscribers and is gigging every other month in some underground bar or basement a million miles from here. These are the artists that are still putting 95% of their effort into their musical craft and 5% on the social media craft.
    Were you here on PE previously under a different name?
    If you're actually reading this then chances are you already have my last album but if NOT and you're curious:
    https://battema.bandcamp.com/

    Also, Ephemeral Sun: it's a thing and we like making things that might be your thing: https://ephemeralsun.bandcamp.com

  19. #369
    Quote Originally Posted by John Miner View Post
    From the OP:

    I'm curious to know if anyone is still planning, or actually producing new music. I'm not talking about for fun, but for actually building a fan base and selling, yes, for money, their own music.

    My questions are:

    1. why?
    2. How do see the future of music as a commodity?
    3. Do you have second doubts about wether you're being realistic?
    4. What formats are you going to use?

    I'd really like to hear what you are honestly thinking.

    1. Never for money. Like RAREBIRD said... A Creative artistic musical outlet is necessary for me to be happy. I've probably only made $1500 since 2006 through CDBaby, Youtube, and Bandcamp. My schoolmate and good friend is the drummer for the band “Great white”. He makes 1500 in 10 minutes. They still play casinos and cruise ships everywhere. That’s where the “money” is these days. He’s 66 years old for crying out loud!!!

    Music is a commodity only if the 1% get a hold of you and want to make a killing off of you. If you start selling records in large numbers, the moneychangers will find you. All it takes is one big HIT for the big boys to sniff you out. I’m reminded of MOBY and the Jason Bourne soundtrack. Lady Gaga plastered herself all over social media before she was noticed. I remember back in the day she was all over myspace.com. Keith Urban did so as well... I remember writing a review of one of his entry level songs back in 1998 or thereabouts at some obscure review website. I can't even remember the name of it. One thing to keep in mind is that Gaga and Urban were pushing very mainstream palatable pop like music. Marketing marketing marketing... How droll.

    2. No doubt about how much fun it is finishing up a song I'm really satisfied with. If someone else likes it, it's even more fun. I halfheartedly market my stuff for about an hour or two a week.

    Don’t quit your day job.

    3. I use Bandcamp, CDBaby, Youtube. some Reddit recently. I make a physical CD when I feel the time is right. Printing up lots of 100 CDs, for 149.00. I produce and master my own stuff and I'm no pro. I let my wife and kids handle most of the artwork on the packaging. They like doing it.

    4. I play music with friends regularly; I have never been in front of a live audience. I have Zero stage presence. lol. I am well aware of my limitations, and consider my music as being “outsider” art. My friends agree hahahah. I’m like the old black dude during the depression who paints watermelons and picket fences on old pieces of wood.

    5. Our ERIS album was basically a LIVE in studio album… it was so much fun to make that I could care less if it makes money. It was a fun and magical year doing that album with good friends. The hour of music on that CD represents weeks and months of playing. I have hours and hours of recordings from those sessions.

    Afterthought….

    My stepbrother at 17 was in a band called the simpletones during the 77- 80s punk era in hollywood. They were playing live sets at a club called the masque and at madame wongs. Some British businessman was mining the scene for talent and signed them and “the crowd” and a few other punk bands to his unheard of “posh boy Records”. Label. The guy is selling those records to this day on the very same record label he used these kids to create. My brother has not realized any real money. he is 65 years old now.
    https://bakullama1.bandcamp.com/album/sleepers-2024
    Last edited by Nijinsky Hind; 3 Weeks Ago at 12:33 PM.
    Still alive and well...
    https://bakullama1.bandcamp.com/

  20. #370
    Quote Originally Posted by John Miner View Post
    It appears there have now been three stages of the music business since the onset of recorded music.

    The first was artist/record company. The artist, musician or band would seek out a label to support and distribute them.... allowing them
    to focus on their craft 100%. The % given to the artist was small, but the exposure could be huge, and if it was successful, it could work out very well for the artist and the label. Recording and album in a proper studio, pressing vinyl, tapes or 8 tracks and distributing nationally or internationally was nearly if not completely impossible for the individual entity.

    The second wave came when digital recording was made available, and artists could record on machines like ADAT then press CD's themselves and distribute them to mostly small distribution houses who would get them into Ma and Pa stores. The artist could send out their music to independent magazines and later websites that would review and get them some exposure. It wasn't impossible to make some money and move a few thousand CD's upon a release. This was the world I entered into in the 1990's. We had distribution with two distributors that covered us in Europe and North America. We would get reviewed, and genuinely welcomed by the community that was trying it's best to survive and stay somewhat relevant as the major labels were basically ignoring this genre.

    Now the third wave seems to be the elimination of physical product, and artists use the streaming platforms for better or for worse.
    I jumped ship from selling music during the Napster Kazaar era when an album we did... and I think a very good one "Tell A Vision" landed on Kazaar and was downloaded 3500 times for free, without us authorizing this and without our consent. There wasn't much we could do because the "enemy" was not know to us specifically, and we certainly did not have the money to hire a lawyer to fight for our rights as music artists or self publishers. I remember a couple of the big artists fighting this.. Metallica? etc.. not sure what came out of it.. but I saw this as a horrific thing for the musicians/artists.

    The contrarian view was that it was a good thing, the file sharing, and all the free exposure unknown artists could get across the WWW... and this was to their benefit because the whole world could hear your music with the click of a mouse. This was the ego driven, look at me, and art isn't about money anyway. This model won the battle but lost the war in my opinion.

    Phase 1 offered true pie in the sky possibilities even with a small percentage from the vast ocean.

    Phase 2 offered a realistic possibility to support your craft with a realistic business model that was like a decent % from a lake after you paid all your own expenses. It took a lot of time however outside of just making music. I think to some degree the music would suffer because the artist would just have to wear "too many hats" at once.

    Phase 3 ..... I don't really understand it personally. It appears that something like Spotify is saying "here is the huge ocean, and you can get it just like the past with that small %, but you don't have a label or team to pay... to do all the work, and you are still left up to yourself to produce product. Producing product can be cheap now... even produced on a computer without studio time or expenses there, and distribution is basically free. Your cut is very small.. but look at the possibility. You see a few pop artists doing well, and a few independents with great social media skills gathering enough likes and subscribers to make it work out ... standing out from the millions of artists who flood the network that don't have 10 hours a day to work 15 social media sites and be producing videos weekly.

    Most of the popular music I hear today sounds dreadful to my ears. Lacks creativity, production lacks dynamic, feel and nuance... especially in the rhythm sections.

    Some of the best stuff I have heard.. and I mean really good... like a fusion band that is playing amazing stuff, has 35 views on youtube, 25 followers or subscribers and is gigging every other month in some underground bar or basement a million miles from here. These are the artists that are still putting 95% of their effort into their musical craft and 5% on the social media craft.

    Just a morning rant before I drink 4 cups of coffee.
    Well, in phase one, there were also artists that went the do it yourself route, like hiring a studio, or find someone with good recording-equipment, recording music and let it be pressed on vinyl. I've known some artist that took that route.
    And phase one can in a way also be divided in two periods. First record-companies who were a bit out of touch with the new market and perhaps affraid to miss the next Beatles and just gave recorddeals, giving artists perhaps some time to grow. Basicly taking the if we throw a lot of stuff, we'll see what sticks to the wall. Later on record-companies were more able to tell what would sell.

  21. #371
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rarebird View Post
    Well, in phase one, there were also artists that went the do it yourself route, like hiring a studio, or find someone with good recording-equipment, recording music and let it be pressed on vinyl. I've known some artist that took that route.
    And phase one can in a way also be divided in two periods. First record-companies who were a bit out of touch with the new market and perhaps affraid to miss the next Beatles and just gave recorddeals, giving artists perhaps some time to grow. Basicly taking the if we throw a lot of stuff, we'll see what sticks to the wall. Later on record-companies were more able to tell what would sell.
    Yes, certainly there were do it yourselfers early on... but to press the vinyl and distribute it yourself to 1000's of radio stations, press etc .... book your own tours etc.. I just don't see that as being very efficient. At some point, the music suffers. One person can try to wear all those hats, but if they really have talent in the music writing and playing.. it would have to take it's toll... if not end up in total and complete burnout.

    I agree that love of the music and not money needs to be there.. a true passion, but I think a good prog or creative musician should be able to cover their expenses and be able to sustain so kind of financial existence.

    How is that done in today's modern world? I don't know, hence the reason for such a conversation.
    I have friends who are sculptors and painters who can pay their basic living and studio expenses. It's not easy, but I personally don't know anyone doing it in music... on the original music side, let alone the prog side. I have heard things are better in Europe.

  22. #372
    Quote Originally Posted by John Miner View Post
    Yes, certainly there were do it yourselfers early on... but to press the vinyl and distribute it yourself to 1000's of radio stations, press etc .... book your own tours etc.. I just don't see that as being very efficient. At some point, the music suffers. One person can try to wear all those hats, but if they really have talent in the music writing and playing.. it would have to take it's toll... if not end up in total and complete burnout.

    I agree that love of the music and not money needs to be there.. a true passion, but I think a good prog or creative musician should be able to cover their expenses and be able to sustain so kind of financial existence.

    How is that done in today's modern world? I don't know, hence the reason for such a conversation.
    I have friends who are sculptors and painters who can pay their basic living and studio expenses. It's not easy, but I personally don't know anyone doing it in music... on the original music side, let alone the prog side. I have heard things are better in Europe.
    Well, I guy I knew and have played with, recorded an album with a drummer. The album was send to a Dutch radio-show, dedicated to progressive rock and they played it. When the drummer came to his record-store, he hardly could open the door of his shop, because people wanted to order the album. I think it had at least 3 pressings. Fun fact, for the original album they used a drawing by some British guy, who wasn't asked for permission. They thought no chance he would ever see the album. Alas, the guy moved to The Hague, where the recordstore of the drummer was located and of cause he saw his drawing in the window of the store (if you own a recordstore and have an album out, you put it on display). So there came some legal problems and for the next pressings a friend of mine was asked to do a new cover. At the third pressing something went wrong with printing the cover. It was a black drawing on a with background and it became the other way round. For the CD edition they have used the original cover by the British artist.
    Their next album was done on a real recordlabel. Arjan Lucassen made his debut on that album.

  23. #373
    Quote Originally Posted by John Miner View Post
    I agree that love of the music and not money needs to be there.. a true passion, but I think a good prog or creative musician should be able to cover their expenses and be able to sustain so kind of financial existence.
    I can't honestly say I agree with this. I think some of the old guard do it, but largely based on touring the nostalgia circuit. The younger ones that I can think of aren't really THAT young (Steven Wilson, Billy Sherwood), and spend as much or perhaps more time on studio work as stage work. One case that might apply would have been Phil Naro who was in a couple of groups that did originals...but he also was in a HUGE number of tribute acts who played constantly. I was in a group with him at one point, a group that did only originals, playing a pretty great festival slot with lots of exposure, and he only JUST squeezed it in between playing shows with his tribute acts.

    I think any player who wishes to focus on live should have an "us and them" mindset: for every "us" show that is about showcasing original music and talent, it is likely necessary to also do one (or several) "them" shows playing the covers and music that the average crowd wants to hear. Or do a tribute version of a band you already like; here on the East Coast I have been dragged to a few tribute shows (Genesis, Yes, that sort of thing) and I can tell you the audience is 3-4x larger than most smaller original bands I see.

    I also think social media is essential; the days of flyers and word of mouth are somewhat in the rear view mirror. Most bands post to places like Facebook/Meta, Twitter/X, Instagram and probably a few dozen others I've never heard of. Speaking as someone who straight up hates social media, it is unfortunately a necessary evil in the modern world of self-managed artists.

    My $0.02.
    If you're actually reading this then chances are you already have my last album but if NOT and you're curious:
    https://battema.bandcamp.com/

    Also, Ephemeral Sun: it's a thing and we like making things that might be your thing: https://ephemeralsun.bandcamp.com

  24. #374
    There are some really smart replies on this thread. I didnít really answer OPís questions so hereís my thoughts after wayyyy too much coffee this morning.

    1. Why?

    Most, if not all of the music I love was created by people who were doing that (trying to build a fan base, trying to sell their music as a commodity). They may have been living in a better time to do that in!

    I think that by trying to build a fan base and asking them to buy your music you are creating a relationship where you both recognize value you in each other. When a fan buys music they arenít just doing it just to listen to it. They are also buying the possibility that more music could be released by that artist in the future or that their existing music could be polished and repackaged in new ways. They are paying for that interaction to keep happening. For the artist, that interaction means that they keep going, keep getting better (or not!), and keep releasing new music. Thatís a really romantic view of music production, but I think in an ideal world thatís how it should work, and sometimes even now that does happen.

    2. How do you see the future of music as a commodity?

    Iím a software engineer and doing that work has brought me joy in the past, but last year I kind of went through a few months of funk when ChatGPT 3 and 4 were released.

    I think that in over the next few years people will to start deciding if they want to genuinely create something new or if they want to ask AI to generate what they want to see/hear. In 2022, someone started a Twitch channel that broadcasts a rudimentary, continuous Seinfeld episode: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nothing,_Forever . I think there are people who in the near future who may be OK or even prefer listening to continuous streams of AI generated music. Regardless, I think there will probably be independent record stores, physical releases, and places to buy digital music as files even if they sell less and less and become more niche over time. If someone is buying an album or a Blu-Ray recording at this point they arenít doing that because they donít know how to use Spotify or YouTube.

    3. Do you have second doubts about wether you're being realistic?

    I donít think musicians or artists are the best judge when it comes to judging whether they have a realistic expectation of success. I don't expect to ever quit my day job, but I don't think I'll ever stop recording weird music in my bedroom even if it is just for me.

    4. What formats are you going to use?

    I was really inspired by how vaporwave artists packaged and sold their music on bandcamp in the 2010s. They were (are?) very creative with how they packaged and sold their music. I bought audiocassettes which were shipped to me with pogs, vintage stickers, and handwritten notes. I bought some music on a floppy disk. I donít know if Iíll ever have physical releases on bandcamp, but I think that if I did then treating the physical release as a form of artistic expression in itself and not just a storage medium is probably the best way to approach physical releases now.

    Thatís a lot of words. Excuse me while I go crank ďSci-FinanceĒ from VdGGís Vital .

  25. #375
    Quote Originally Posted by moorgladery View Post
    I don’t know if I’ll ever have physical releases on bandcamp, but I think that if I did then treating the physical release as a form of artistic expression in itself and not just a storage medium is probably the best way to approach physical releases now.
    Great thoughts, great posts dude. I'm in IT as well and recognize what you were saying about AI.

    And the above is very much how I see things. I bought a CD from a band called Fossil Aerosol Mining Project that was a thing of beauty in a handcrafted wrapper with a wax seal and everything. And this is currently somewhere over the Atlantic on it's way to me (the limited CD thing): https://facture.bandcamp.com/album/alico

    I continue to be drawn to stuff like what zoviet france did with their albums. Or the cool liquid-filled sleeve for the Ozric Tentacles live album "Spice Doubt Streaming." It's expensive to buy and expensive to make, but in smaller quantities it really does become a unique and special thing that is worth the physical format

    IMHO
    If you're actually reading this then chances are you already have my last album but if NOT and you're curious:
    https://battema.bandcamp.com/

    Also, Ephemeral Sun: it's a thing and we like making things that might be your thing: https://ephemeralsun.bandcamp.com

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