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Thread: Krautrock Binge

  1. #176
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    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    Strange, it's hardcover but only about 10.5" x 10.5". I'd still like to get it, but it's a bit expensive. This doesn't seem to be available anywhere else though.
    I have the book, and it is absolutely a gem, the 80 posters from the private collection are in high resolution, and also high quality offset printed. Must have!

  2. #177
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    Mythos (1972) is flippin fantastic. Just a sweet, hazy ride. Great sound, great studio post-production. Would love this on vinyl.

  3. #178
    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    Mythos (1972) is flippin fantastic. Just a sweet, hazy ride. Great sound, great studio post-production. Would love this on vinyl.
    I have it on vinyl. I am not too overwhelmed, although it's a more than a fine record.

  4. #179
    Moderator Sean's Avatar
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    Here's a look at all things Krautrock by way of a classic....


  5. #180
    Dennis - Hyperthalamus. This is a great, overlooked album - members of bands like Frumpy, Xhol, Tomorrow's Gift, Thirsty Moon etc

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=EIKdKZX_YIo&t=10s

  6. #181
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    Dennis - Hyperthalamus.
    That's a new one on me. Not bad, not bad at all. Thanks!

  7. #182
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zappathustra View Post
    Dennis - Hyperthalamus. This is a great, overlooked album - members of bands like Frumpy, Xhol, Tomorrow's Gift, Thirsty Moon etc

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=EIKdKZX_YIo&t=10s
    Yes a great album indeed. Its on Krautrock Box Vol. 3 too.....

  8. #183
    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    Yes a great album indeed. Its on Krautrock Box Vol. 3 too.....
    That box set is a bit of a mixed bag (box?) as I recall - & I don't recall the Dennis album being the standout, by any stretch.

    I'll need to go back, & have another listen (once I've emerged from my Pharaoh binge).

  9. #184
    Just listened to Alcatraz: Vampire State Building. A good one and, going into October, thematically appropriate. “oh Baby, it ain’t no use running away from me”
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

  10. #185
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    Quote Originally Posted by per anporth View Post
    That box set is a bit of a mixed bag (box?) as I recall - & I don't recall the Dennis album being the standout, by any stretch.

    I'll need to go back, & have another listen (once I've emerged from my Pharaoh binge).
    Yeah, not all top shelf aces, a bit spotty.

  11. #186
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Progbear View Post
    Just listened to Alcatraz: Vampire State Building. A good one and, going into October, thematically appropriate. “oh Baby, it ain’t no use running away from me”
    IS it good? I'll have to give it another listen, it's been a long time. But I always sort of felt I bought that CD because I wanted to have it - whether or not it was good! It always seemed to get lukewarm write-ups. But the cover is just cool.
    Primary procreation is accomplished…

  12. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    Mythos (1972) is flippin fantastic. Just a sweet, hazy ride. Great sound, great studio post-production. Would love this on vinyl.
    I had it on the original OHR label since back in the 70's - One of my top 5 favorite Krautrock records of all time...!

    I sold it last year (along with all my LP's), I'm a CD guy nowadays...

  13. #188
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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  14. #189
    ^ I actually just found that thing myself a couple of days ago! Her English isn't all too bad, considering how challenging it is for Japanese (and East-Asians in general) to adapt to Western phonetic craft, technique and logic.

    For one thing, krautrock got "cool" in Japan already by the first half of the 80s, arguably even a bit earlier - seriously influencing groups like Yellow Magic Orchestra and Maboroshi No Sekai et al. And never really ceased to be, still inspiring anything creative in non-academic (as well as even -some- academic) corners of music over there today. I'll never forget hearing Boredoms' Pop Tatari and Onanie Bomb for the first time and thinking that this was what it would have sounded like if Damo Suzuki's stint with Can had been all about "Peking O".



    By the mid-90s Stereolab, Tortoise, Radiohead and others sanctioned the debt of kraut on a global scale of rock/pop, presenting grand dialling of formulas sometimes even nearing the Japanese mainstream. Many hit wonders and pop stars from Japan often referred "deep" artists like Kraftwerk, Can, Neu! and Tangerine Dream.

    Little else was as severely radical in "out" rock-making than Nippon nepotism and Japanoise by the later 90s, though - be they audio-sculpturing as with Aube, Otomo Yoshihide, Hijokaidan, Merzbow or rock/shock-sonics such as High Rise or Fushitsusha - so krautrock couldn't tempt extremes only for realms of figuring greatness. No wonder raunchy racketeers like Cave/Birthday Party, This Heat, PiL and others set the scene for own careers on calling through the Jap premise of underground markets already by the early 80s. Perfect time and place for ruthless service of fine nonsense and dread; take some of Incapacitants' work, for instance; purposefully construed as slowed-down nagging gone low-frequencies solely for reasons of invoking gut uncomfort in listeners.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  15. #190
    ^
    Not forgetting the groundbreaking Vanity Records and its series of releases between '78 and '82. Many krautrock influenced bands on it (Dada, R.N.A. Organism, Tolerance, Back Ground Music, SAB, Sympathy Nervous etc.)
    Macht das ohr auf!

    COSMIC EYE RECORDS

  16. #191
    ^ Very much so. But the Vanity catalog was always infamously difficult to track down here in northern Europe. Consequently these acts went unheard for a long while, although I remember cassette anthologies circulating with one particular nerd among the record-collector's community in Bergen. Incidentally he was also the first dude to play me Nigel Ayers (Nocturnal Emissions), Mnemonists/Biota and David Lee Myers (Arcane Device). He used to refer to his own taste in music as "abstract tension necessitated" or something like that.

    But was all ensuing "rock/pop experimentalism" measured by krautrock curriculum? Maybe not (and definitely not by Velvets/Stooges either), but transcendence set standards of virtue in outlandishness so that daring games somehow were perceived to become more of a norm than an anomaly. Of course, post- and art-punk gothic industrial in the UK (late 70s and early 80s with Bauhaus, Cabaret Voltaire. Test Dept and so on) as well as the Neue Deutsche Welle in West-Germany (Die Krupps, DAF, Der Plan) laid trait to the emergence of EBM (Electronic Body Music) and the entire Nitzer Ebb balustrade for emerging synth-pop mores (say Human League or Thompson Twins), by which time I guess the entire round drove full circle and deal done. What was avant-garde in nature of Faust or Can in 1971, needless to state, delivered its own normality a decade on.

    Have to say that I never really warmed to either EBM or its ascending ghouls in offspring. The Shamen were still licking out the Nitzer recipés some decade on, never reinventing or reimagining grace by furthering good tradition as in actually developing, whereas someone like The Orb at least tried to do just that.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  17. #192
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    But was all ensuing "rock/pop experimentalism" measured by krautrock curriculum? Maybe not (and definitely not by Velvets/Stooges either),
    Of course not, there were also the other academic "usual suspects" (that had also an influence on krautrock), plus the healthy dose of post-glam experimentalism and early new wave eccentricities, that played a major role at what adventurous pop/rock became post 1985.

    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Have to say that I never really warmed to either EBM or its ascending ghouls in offspring. The Shamen were still licking out the Nitzer recipés some decade on, never reinventing or reimagining grace by furthering good tradition as in actually developing, whereas someone like The Orb at least tried to do just that.
    I never warmed to the electronic direction of Shamen or Killing Joke f.e. Also, bands like Orb or FSOL sounded somewhat "light" to me, having heard many 70s german and french electronic artists plus musique concrete and the free festival spacerock scene. I came to appreciate some aspects of their output somewhat late, I think around 1995 or 1996.
    Macht das ohr auf!

    COSMIC EYE RECORDS

  18. #193
    Also, bands like Orb or FSOL sounded somewhat "light" to me, having heard many 70s german and french electronic artists plus musique concrete and the free festival spacerock scene.

    I think that this observation is just spot on - &, I agree, it's difficult to articulate precisely what's at stake here. I think "light" begins to get close...

    Orb & FSOL are intriguing outfits to mention - it would be fun to extend this to groups like Autechre, or Aphex Twin - for instance - to see how far this holds.

    For me, there are two key things - first, & foremost, the pioneers in Germany were using analogue instruments, & working with tapes. Second, they took what they did in the studio, & then experimented with doing it in concert halls.

    That said - the most interesting bands on the cusp between electronica & jazz, the ones, for instance, who sample live, & feed the samples back into the improv, get much closer to the creative apogee of early German pioneers (one example, going back a wee bit - Spring Heel Jack, with Matt Shipp & Evan Parker).

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