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Thread: A Thread About COFFEE

  1. #276
    Outraged bystander markwoll's Avatar
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    So the cold brew experiment continues.
    Much stronger than I anticipated.
    The first pot I made, I drank as I would a pot of french press.
    Something of a mistake. Much jitteryness ensued. I am not a caffeine lightweight.
    So in the current round, a couple of double shots and a glass and a half of cold brew seems to be the right deal.
    Even with cheap beans the cold brew is smooth.
    I may try another batch with some beans I picked up in Richmond, VA last week.
    A nice little place called Sefton coffee. They roast on site and sell through etsy at https://www.etsy.com/shop/AproposRoasters .
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  2. #277
    You DO realize that cheap lower grade beans contain MORE caffeine than the high quality stuff, right? So that brewing low grade death coffee at French press strength is like concentrated caffeine crack. Plus the awful colloids (acids) these coffees have also increase jitters as your body realizes it's drinking stuff never meant to be consumed by human digestive systems.
    Quote Originally Posted by markwoll View Post
    So the cold brew experiment continues.
    Much stronger than I anticipated.
    The first pot I made, I drank as I would a pot of french press.
    Something of a mistake. Much jitteryness ensued. I am not a caffeine lightweight.
    So in the current round, a couple of double shots and a glass and a half of cold brew seems to be the right deal.
    Even with cheap beans the cold brew is smooth.
    I may try another batch with some beans I picked up in Richmond, VA last week.
    A nice little place called Sefton coffee. They roast on site and sell through etsy at https://www.etsy.com/shop/AproposRoasters .

  3. #278
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    I've leisurely read through this thread over the last week or thereabouts...About a year ago or more I started buying some Gourmet Coffees from the grocery store and enjoying them on the weekends. Still drinking Folgers or Maxwell House M-Th in the morning before work. Trouble is, the gourmet/specialty coffees have pretty much ruined any enjoyment of the common dross, and as soon as the cans I have on hand are gone, I'm going to switch over to all specialty. Life's too short for bad beer, bad whisky, or bad coffee.

    Excellent info and links in this thread, much obliged, people. I ordered the Dallis Bros Burundi and it is wonderful. Ordered a couple others from sellers at links provided in this thread, but they haven't arrived yet.

    The only point of contention I have is with the statement that Dunkin Donuts coffee is awful. I think it's pretty great.
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  4. #279
    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu View Post
    I've leisurely read through this thread over the last week or thereabouts...About a year ago or more I started buying some Gourmet Coffees from the grocery store and enjoying them on the weekends. Still drinking Folgers or Maxwell House M-Th in the morning before work. Trouble is, the gourmet/specialty coffees have pretty much ruined any enjoyment of the common dross, and as soon as the cans I have on hand are gone, I'm going to switch over to all specialty. Life's too short for bad beer, bad whisky, or bad coffee.

    Excellent info and links in this thread, much obliged, people. I ordered the Dallis Bros Burundi and it is wonderful. Ordered a couple others from sellers at links provided in this thread, but they haven't arrived yet.

    The only point of contention I have is with the statement that Dunkin Donuts coffee is awful. I think it's pretty great.
    Look for local roasters whenever you can. Most of them know how to properly roast (many still burn it like Star-yucks).
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  5. #280
    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu View Post
    I've leisurely read through this thread over the last week or thereabouts...About a year ago or more I started buying some Gourmet Coffees from the grocery store and enjoying them on the weekends. Still drinking Folgers or Maxwell House M-Th in the morning before work. Trouble is, the gourmet/specialty coffees have pretty much ruined any enjoyment of the common dross, and as soon as the cans I have on hand are gone, I'm going to switch over to all specialty. Life's too short for bad beer, bad whisky, or bad coffee.

    Excellent info and links in this thread, much obliged, people. I ordered the Dallis Bros Burundi and it is wonderful. Ordered a couple others from sellers at links provided in this thread, but they haven't arrived yet.

    The only point of contention I have is with the statement that Dunkin Donuts coffee is awful. I think it's pretty great.
    Welcome aboard the coffee train, brother.

    I can no longer drink Folgers either, although there are a few store brands that I do enjoy -- I typically keep Eight O'Clock Coffee at home for drinking throughout the week, and find it to be really good actually (especially the Colombian blend). It has been my favorite "regular" coffee brand for about 10 years. Nothing beats the specialty stuff though.

    And I actually really like Dunkin Donuts' coffee too. I prefer it to Starbucks by quite a wide margin, so if I'm out and about that's where I go for coffee.

    Joe Muggs used to make some really good stuff too, but I haven't bought any in several years.

  6. #281
    This is where I get mine:





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  7. #282
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronmac View Post
    Look for local roasters whenever you can. Most of them know how to properly roast (many still burn it like Star-yucks).
    I'm all about buying local, but the last time I went into Kroger, I found a kiosk that said "Buy Local," and it had various grocery type items on it. I bought some peppers, barbecue sauce, and some specialty coffees. The coffees were from a company called Silver Bridge in Gallipolis, Ohio. Local enough, I guess. Anyway, I had their Blend, a Medium Roast. It was certainly better than Folgers and the like, but it wasn't better than Meijer's Kona Blend, or Gevalia Kenya, or Gevalia Papua New Guinea, and my expectations were that it should be. Perhaps my expectations were unrealistic, but I think I'm going to focus on coffee based on locale. Single origin coffee where the soil and climate help to craft a unique flavor profile. It'll all be trial and error, and we don't have anywhere around here where you can go in and choose from 6 or 7 different coffees "on tap." It does mean that my purchases will be through the post, however. I am keeping 7 or 8 different coffees "in rotation" at any one time, so I can compare them easily with each other.
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  8. #283
    These last two posts are interesting. The sheer volume of barrels in the Allegheny photo make me suspect the freshness in a place with so many choices. Plus, are those barrels covered?

    Moecurlythanu, ronmac's comment about buying local was about finding a roaster, not letting the local supermarket chain find one for you. While your search for flavor subtleties by growing locale is absolutely right on, you greatly increase your odds of freshness helping those tastes by finding a local roaster.

    Good luck to you all.

  9. #284
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    Is freshness determined by when the beans were picked, or when the beans were roasted, or when the beans were ground? Subpart to that question - Does keeping beans whole (unground) prolong freshness?
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  10. #285
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arabicadabra View Post

    Moecurlythanu, ronmac's comment about buying local was about finding a roaster, not letting the local supermarket chain find one for you. While your search for flavor subtleties by growing locale is absolutely right on, you greatly increase your odds of freshness helping those tastes by finding a local roaster.
    Some research and legwork will probably be required. That's OK. I did a quick Google search, and there are at least 10 roasting companies in Cleveland.
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  11. #286
    Outraged bystander markwoll's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu View Post
    Is freshness determined by when the beans were picked, or when the beans were roasted, or when the beans were ground? Subpart to that question - Does keeping beans whole (unground) prolong freshness?
    Once the beans are ground, use them promptly. They get stale.
    Generally if the beans have had 'a normal life' the freshness is based the length of time after roasting.
    I love to get beans roasted within the previous week, that will be used during the following week or so.
    I've gotten beans roasted earlier in the day and had them the next morning, they seem to improve a day or so after roasting.
    When buying 'premium' beans off the shelf, I shoot for no more than 6 weeks.
    There is a bit of disconnect in the roasting date info between roasters that sell direct and those who sell to retail.
    Direct roasters will tell the date roasted. The retail roasters will have a 'Best used by date', usually 10-12 months after the roasting date.
    In the retail case looking at the date and finding the farthest date from 'today' especially 12 months out will get you the closest to a recent roast.
    According to the roasters I have communicated with, sales of 'roasted on date' beans tail off if unsold after a few weeks.
    They have less control over how long beans stay in storage, so sold by date works better for them.
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  12. #287
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    ^ Great info, thanks.

  13. #288
    We've been buying Lavazza Gran Selezione dark roast lately (Kroger has it). Very smooth and chocolaty.
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  14. #289
    Quote Originally Posted by arabicadabra View Post
    These last two posts are interesting. The sheer volume of barrels in the Allegheny photo make me suspect the freshness in a place with so many choices. Plus, are those barrels covered?
    Their roaster is on-site:



    They're roasting constantly and supplying many local bars and restaurants. It's all whole bean, which you select and grind yourself.

    Quote Originally Posted by markwoll View Post
    I love to get beans roasted within the previous week, that will be used during the following week or so.
    I've gotten beans roasted earlier in the day and had them the next morning, they seem to improve a day or so after roasting.
    When buying 'premium' beans off the shelf, I shoot for no more than 6 weeks.
    Coffee needs to de-gas after roasting. It's best to sit a little.

    Properly stored, coffee beans will stay good for about a month after roasting. Ground coffee will last for one to two weeks after roasting.

    Coffee is best stored in an airtight container in a cool, dry location out of the light. The best material choices for the container are ceramic or opaque glass. Plastic and metal could alter the flavor. For the first week of storage, containers should be opened or vented to release the gas produced by the roasted beans, and to prevent it from changing the quality of the coffee.

    NEVER REFRIGERATE OR FREEZE COFFEE.
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  15. #290
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    ^ If the window of freshness is really that small, then buying relatively small amounts and keeping only one or two types of coffee on hand at any time would be a necessity.

    I haven't noticed any difference in taste between when I opened a package and when I got near the end of it. Maybe they were all "stale" to begin with? For example, that Silver Bridge has a "roasted on" date on the package. It was 2 1/2 to 3 months before purchase date.

  16. #291
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    I want this


  17. #292
    Moderator Duncan Glenday's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Dark Elf View Post
    We've been buying Lavazza Gran Selezione dark roast lately (Kroger has it). Very smooth and chocolaty.
    I only use Lavazza in my espresso / latte / etc. machine.
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  18. #293
    What about locales?

    I find that I like African coffees best in general, followed by Pacific coasts, and don't really like Latin American coffees much. The only way I can describe it is that the LA coffees taste sour to me.
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  19. #294
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    What about locales?

    I find that I like African coffees best in general,
    So far, this is where I'm at. My toes are barely wet, though. I'm keeping a text file with my ratings of the various brands and varieties I've had, and will eventually be able to pinpoint just which are my favorites as a result.

  20. #295
    Outraged bystander markwoll's Avatar
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    I guess it all depends.
    Ethiopian Sidamo Ardi has been a consistent favorite for years. I think success may have spoiled that a little.
    I don't get the floral notes as often now as when it was a 'new thing'
    Estate grown Kona was my drink for a few years. Nice but not exciting. I moved on.
    There was a local roaster that had a central/south american small batch subscription that I loved. Consistent and carefully roasted. Too bad they got out of the business.
    Found another local roaster with a more world wide offering. Some great Kenyan AA, Rwandan.
    The owners had connections to Peru and Bolivia with some great offerings.

    Most times, unless it is not very good coffee to begin with, the roast makes it.
    I have had some shit coffee from local roasters. For a premium price they get one chance from me.
    We have a lot to choose from, locally and nationally. For what some of these folks charge, there is no room for sour/bitter/burnt.
    A reputation only goes so far. Some hipsters will buy anything, until the next thing comes along.
    Most of the roasters around here have classes, there are always going to be new folks coming up.

    And there are always folks who will settle for cheap.
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  22. #297
    Outraged bystander markwoll's Avatar
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    Last edited by markwoll; 03-18-2019 at 02:12 PM.
    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it."
    -- Aristotle
    Nostalgia, you know, ain't what it used to be. Furthermore, they tells me, it never was.
    "The future will be better tomorrow." Dan Quayle

  23. #298
    Orange Tick Squasher Buddhabreath's Avatar
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    I buy my coffee exclusively from Just Coffee - they are a coop and partner with the farmers to produce a sustainable, fair trade, organic product.

    http://justcoffee.coop/
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  24. #299
    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu View Post
    So far, this is where I'm at. My toes are barely wet, though. I'm keeping a text file with my ratings of the various brands and varieties I've had, and will eventually be able to pinpoint just which are my favorites as a result.
    As Greg (arabicadabra) knows personally, I agree with all the African love above.

    Slightly related...my "high end" coffee drinking these days is various African crop from Four Five Roasters (Queens, NY) via the Amazon Subscribe & Save Store

  25. #300

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