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Thread: Interview with Yes from 1983 when Eddie Jobson was still in them

  1. #26
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    And, for those who were around here then, his essay caused quite a stir on PE when this was originally shared here, causing Eddie to write even more:

    "Re: YES
    Author: EJ
    Date: 03-25-07 19:11

    I did not wish for my candid response to the Yes question be turned into a gossipfest in the blabosphere… 150 responses to my remarks on the Progressive Ears website alone. And in trying to be honest with the members of this forum, I am now viewed by some of the uninformed mouse-waggers out there as another self-absorbed rock star, a preening prima donna, etc. People just love this silly stuff.

    More as a response to the Progressive Ears forum than this one, let me clarify a couple of things: Firstly, I have no problem with people making large amounts of money—in music or anywhere else—or in them driving nice cars. I drive a very nice car myself and have been lucky enough to afford a comfortable lifestyle in a nice part of town—good for me. The point of the remarks was to set the stage for a description of ‘a scene’ made up of people who, generally, treated those not in the clique in a somewhat chilly and supercilious manner. As a 17-year-old from down-to-earth County Durham, this posture was undermining and unkind. We were all pretty young then, but I was the youngest one of all—even at the formation of UK, which was post-Curved Air, Roxy, Zappa, and, excluding Tull, was even post-all of my guest appearances (with King Crimson etc.), I was still only 22.

    Secondly, I do not live my life as a self-pitying victim; on the contrary—I consider myself to have been lucky and privileged to have had a successful band career as part of an amazing musical movement, one that I retired from at the age of 25. And, although a few negative feelings and memories do remain—usually in connection with the lack of generosity of a small handful of people—I remain admirers of them as musicians and have long outgrown any ill will toward them personally. Rather than acrimony, any residual sentiments tend more toward feelings of loss—the lost opportunities to create something meaningful, forge good memories or friendships, or simply make the best of life and our musical situation. Let me also add that I understand how certain personalities would perceive me as priggish, but it never feels good to be viewed in a way that you know you are not.

    Speaking of which: can we please put this ridiculousness behind us regarding stage makeup? I don’t want to be a spokesperson for face paint. I spent much of my early teens in and around the theater, particularly the one run by my father. To me, if you walk onto a stage, whether you are David Bowie or John Kerry—it’s theater. Even if you are in denial about it, if you have an audience… you’re putting on a show. Personally, I was never terribly comfortable on stage being stared at and, to this day, I seriously dislike having my photograph taken. It is one of the reasons I left the spotlight and stopped performing live so many years ago. However, my job in 1973 was to ‘replace’ the highly flamboyant Brian Eno in Britain’s biggest glam-rock band at the age of eighteen. Roxy embraced and promulgated the idea of theatricality, and portrayed a complex image that referenced a certain 1920’s-Berlin androgynous decadence not really understood by most, especially in the U.S. It’s why Andy Warhol loved us. This was a band with a fulltime majordomo/valet on staff. At the same time, I remember my late friend John Entwistle telling me about Roger Daltry showing up to gigs well dressed, and then changing into a t-shirt and ripped jeans for the show—it all made complete sense to me.

    During my several years with Roxy, I became pretty adept at dealing with stage makeup myself and became distrustful of the pancake ladies at the BBC. Of course, both Zappa and the bearded, pipe-smoking farmers of Jethro Tull gave me some grief over that particular ability, but always in good humour—Ian Anderson even gave me a makeup bag as a gag birthday gift once—however, both Frank and Ian had flirted with the idea for themselves by the time I had left their bands (Ian couldn’t do it though because he sweated it all off). By 1984, and the shooting of the “Owner of a Lonely Heart” video, of course I would do my own face paint(!)… it was lights, camera, action all over again. Why both Allan and Chris felt a need to mention it in interviews—I’ll leave for others to figure out.

    I think I am done now with answering the Yes question.

    EJ"

  2. #27
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
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    I seem to remember when there was a memorial for Chris Squire in London not long after he died that was attended by several Yes members both current and former, and there were photos posted that showed Jobson was in attendance. My mind might be playing tricks on me, but that definitely rings a bell. Bruford was there, Geoff Downes, etc. and there was a plaque put up in his honor.
    Interviewer of reprobate ne'er-do-well musicians of the long-haired rock n' roll persuasion at: www.velvetthunder.co.uk and former scribe at Classic Rock Society. Only vaguely aware of anything other than music.

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  3. #28
    (aka timmybass69) timmy's Avatar
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    Thanks for posting that, Dan. I remember reading that years ago but lost access to it.
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  4. #29
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    I either didn't know or forgot that the one time I saw Jobson live (at NEARfest) he had already retired from live performance.
    Primary procreation is accomplished…

  5. #30
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by begnagrad View Post
    Five men, five terrible, 80s fashion ideas. Um, is that Squire in the middle? Or Downes? I honestly can't tell. Either way, is he wearing earrings? And that shirt, despite saying "Yes" in French, is horrible! Not that I was dressing any less horribly 80s at the time, but there are fewer pictures as evidence!
    Primary procreation is accomplished…

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    Five men, five terrible, 80s fashion ideas. Um, is that Squire in the middle? Or Downes? I honestly can't tell. Either way, is he wearing earrings? And that shirt, despite saying "Yes" in French, is horrible! Not that I was dressing any less horribly 80s at the time, but there are fewer pictures as evidence!
    I don't know that we should be looking at any period of Yes for fashion advice.
    Music isn't about chops, or even about talent - it's about sound and the way that sound communicates to people. Mike Keneally

  7. #32
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    ^^ this

    ------------

    Death inspires me like a dog inspires a rabbit
    Death inspires me like a dog inspires a rabbit

  8. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Roth View Post
    During my several years with Roxy, I became pretty adept at dealing with stage makeup myself and became distrustful of the pancake ladies at the BBC. Of course, both Zappa and the bearded, pipe-smoking farmers of Jethro Tull gave me some grief over that particular ability, but always in good humour—Ian Anderson even gave me a makeup bag as a gag birthday gift once—however, both Frank and Ian had flirted with the idea for themselves by the time I had left their bands (Ian couldn’t do it though because he sweated it all off).
    The thought of Zappa going onstage with makeup..heh heh.

  9. #34
    Interesting that Eddie seems to have been pissed off by Squire in particular - I mean, it doesn't surprise me considering that Bruford had similar things to say about his high-handedness and "political" way of working - but I recall elsewhere that Squire was very complimentary about The Green Album.
    You have not heard anything like Vostok Lake, nor do you know anyone who has.

  10. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by calyx View Post
    As for rehearsals with Jobson, Eddie himself had mentioned that they did get together, although I didn't get the impression they addressed a full concert repertoire, it was more to feel if they gelled as a performing group. Famously bits of the video to "Owner" are from what looks like the band's rehearsal room, with Eddie almost entirely edited out in the finished video. Perhaps they were actually rehearsing there, although it didn't last long.
    My guess is that what we see in the video was staged for the video and that when Eddie has described some jamming together, that was on some other occasion. That's what Jobson's comments imply.

    Quote Originally Posted by calyx View Post
    The story is that the band were advised to have Tony back in the line-up to secure their rights to the name Yes, having three original members rather than two. Jobson was offered to stay in a two-keyboardists situation but would have none of it, so he left.
    It remains to me very unclear precisely what happened vis-à-vis Kaye returning. Kaye tells a different story to Jobson. (I'm not saying anyone's lying, but people obviously have different perspectives on events.)
    Where Are They Now? Yes news: http://www.bondegezou.co.uk/wh_now.htm
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  11. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by Progatron View Post
    I seem to remember when there was a memorial for Chris Squire in London not long after he died that was attended by several Yes members both current and former, and there were photos posted that showed Jobson was in attendance. My mind might be playing tricks on me, but that definitely rings a bell. Bruford was there, Geoff Downes, etc. and there was a plaque put up in his honor.
    Possibly your mind is playing tricks? https://www.loudersound.com/features...t-london-hotel reports Bruford, Downes and others, but not Jobson (although it doesn't give an exhaustive list of attendees).
    Where Are They Now? Yes news: http://www.bondegezou.co.uk/wh_now.htm
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  12. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by vostoklake View Post
    Interesting that Eddie seems to have been pissed off by Squire in particular - I mean, it doesn't surprise me considering that Bruford had similar things to say about his high-handedness and "political" way of working - but I recall elsewhere that Squire was very complimentary about The Green Album.
    I get the impression that Squire could be charming, was generally nice and often had good things to say about (and to) a lot of people. (Contrast John Wetton, who was frequently abrasive.) But Squire was also high-handed, political and keen on other people paying for stuff (booze, prostitutes, etc.). So Squire would turn up late and drunk, and get you to pay for more drinks, but he'd be a good time.*

    * Except when he was on coke.
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  13. #38
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bondegezou View Post
    Possibly your mind is playing tricks? https://www.loudersound.com/features...t-london-hotel reports Bruford, Downes and others, but not Jobson (although it doesn't give an exhaustive list of attendees).
    I suppose it is. I'm mixing something up. I wonder what it is that I'm thinking of...
    Interviewer of reprobate ne'er-do-well musicians of the long-haired rock n' roll persuasion at: www.velvetthunder.co.uk and former scribe at Classic Rock Society. Only vaguely aware of anything other than music.

    'The best stuff is really when Mick Pointer was a baby, banging on pots and pans. That was their most "out there" stuff.' - JKL2000

  14. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by bondegezou View Post
    It remains to me very unclear precisely what happened vis-à-vis Kaye returning. Kaye tells a different story to Jobson. (I'm not saying anyone's lying, but people obviously have different perspectives on events.)
    I used to have a book about the band Badfinger mentioning that Kaye had started 90125 but "had time" to do a club tour with Badfinger in 1983, before finally telling Tom Evans he was going to commit again to Yes (not long before Evans's death in November 1983).

  15. #40
    Member IMWeasel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bondegezou View Post
    I get the impression that Squire could be charming, was generally nice and often had good things to say about (and to) a lot of people. (Contrast John Wetton, who was frequently abrasive.) But Squire was also high-handed, political and keen on other people paying for stuff (booze, prostitutes, etc.). So Squire would turn up late and drunk, and get you to pay for more drinks, but he'd be a good time.*

    * Except when he was on coke.
    Of all the musicians I wish I could just hang out with randomly, Chris Squire was pretty high on that list
    Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines.

  16. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by bondegezou View Post
    I get the impression that Squire could be charming, was generally nice and often had good things to say about (and to) a lot of people.
    He certainly complimented me on my sense of humour that one time I met him! But honestly, I've met a lot of very "political" people, the kind of people who can make you feel like you're the most important person on the planet when they want something from you, then stab you in the back once you become an obstacle. And from what I've read on Yes history, Chris was often the guy who was both sent to negotiate with people (eg ringing up Wakeman at 4 in the morning), and who acted as the hatchet man when necessary.
    You have not heard anything like Vostok Lake, nor do you know anyone who has.

  17. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by interbellum View Post
    On the other hand: Jobson didn't play much solo on Jethro Tull's A, although he did give it a keyboardsound that was close to his own.
    Have you seen him playing live with JT? His solo was a master piece.

  18. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by rickm View Post
    Have you seen him playing live with JT? His solo was a master piece.
    Correct. Didn't see him live, but on the Slipstream-DVD and a recording of the I Tribute To JS Bach concert from 1985.

  19. #44
    Member chescorph's Avatar
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    This is quite impressively played

    https://youtu.be/e-IERYt4KB8

  20. #45
    (aka timmybass69) timmy's Avatar
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    Interesting. I had never noticed those Moog Taurus pedals before. I wonder what they used those for?

    jethro-taurus.jpg
    "Why is it when these great Prog guys get together, they always want to make a Journey album?"
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  21. #46
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    Wow. That is a great performance.

  22. #47
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    I must play the Slipstream DVD sometime soon.

  23. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by timmy View Post
    Interesting. I had never noticed those Moog Taurus pedals before. I wonder what they used those for?
    The bass drone at the beginning of "Black Sunday" might be one place (as I think Pegg is playing a higher-register part).

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