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Thread: The Audiophile Thread

  1. #1176
    I'm hoping someone in this thread can help me with a question regarding purchasing new vinyl records. Although I'm not currently using the vinyl format a relative has recently gotten back into it and has asked for a few records for Christmas. As I'm shopping I am repeatedly seeing the acronym OGV vinyl. I couldn't find any definitive answer researching on the internet although some are saying it means 180 gram others say it's about compression and/or the amount of thickness of the vinyl can anyone explain the true meaning. Thanks.

  2. #1177
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    It doesn't have to do with the vinyl. It means there is a download code for an Ogg Vorbis/Video (OGV) file that comes with the album. It plays on a Sony PSP, or with a quick conversion on an Ipod, Iphone etc.
    Source

  3. #1178
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Yeah, interesting that Mr. Lowry and a couple other self-appointed experts got SCHOOLED in fiber-optic technology by a 25-year telecom veteran. Digital jitter of course has nothing to do with the transmission method and everything to do with clocking accuracy. Both co-ax and optical provide way more bandwidth than audio will ever need -- although optical is a couple of orders of magnitude higher than coax. That's why all the telecos are interconnected with fiber, not copper.
    The bandwidth on optical is not limited by carrier frequency, it's limited by conversion on both ends. Optical provides enough bandwidth for high res multichannel audio, but I'm not sure with affordable optical transceivers that it's way more bandwidth in that application. The fiber system that provides my cable, has a hell of a lot of bandwidth, but the POS won't give me Dolby Digital Plus, which is way better than Dolby Digital. That's why one wants to stream Netflix or HBO to a receiver from a PS3 or smart TV.
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  4. #1179
    Quote Originally Posted by Gladiator1634 View Post
    I'm hoping someone in this thread can help me with a question regarding purchasing new vinyl records. Although I'm not currently using the vinyl format a relative has recently gotten back into it and has asked for a few records for Christmas. As I'm shopping I am repeatedly seeing the acronym OGV vinyl. I couldn't find any definitive answer researching on the internet although some are saying it means 180 gram others say it's about compression and/or the amount of thickness of the vinyl can anyone explain the true meaning. Thanks.
    Where are you seeing this? I've been buying new and used vinyl for some years now, and it is new to me. It looks similar to ORG, which is the name of an audiophile reissue company, or possibly JVC, the Japanese company long noted for superior vinyl formulations.

  5. #1180
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    Many dealers and fora will use OG as an abbreviation for "original." If V is used as an abbreviation for "vinyl," you get OGV = Original Vinyl.
    Just guessing, I've never seen it used before.

  6. #1181
    Quote Originally Posted by NorthNY Mark View Post
    Where are you seeing this? I've been buying new and used vinyl for some years now, and it is new to me. It looks similar to ORG, which is the name of an audiophile reissue company, or possibly JVC, the Japanese company long noted for superior vinyl formulations.
    OK, I just googled it, and it appears to be a misunderstanding of 180 gram vinyl--LOL. In general, the thickness of the vinyl will have little effect on sound, though the audiophile companies (which usually make the better reissues, IMHO) tend to use 180 and 200 gram vinyl. The problem with using that as a benchmark is that a lot of non-audiophile companies, who use CDs as masters, also tout their use of heavy vinyl (one common hype sticker, used by the very worst companies, says something like "180 gram--good enough for audiophiles!"). For most new music releases, you usually won't have any choices, and have to hope that the record is mastered and manufactured with care. For reissues of popular older albums, on the other hand, you may be inundated with choices. Unfortunately, in my experience, the better choices for the latter tend to be the more expensive ones, coming from companies that use mainly analog sources and cutting (such as MFSL, Analogue Productions, ORG Music, and Speakers Corner). The phrase "all analog chain," as well as a named mastering engineer, should be more significant than the thickness of the vinyl. As always, though, there are exceptions, and YMMV, and all that.
    Last edited by NorthNY Mark; 12-13-2015 at 06:19 PM.

  7. #1182
    False Number 9 Pr33t's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorthNY Mark View Post
    OK, I just googled it, and it appears to be a misunderstanding of 180 gram vinyl--LOL. In general, the thickness of the vinyl will have little effect on sound, though the audiophile companies (which usually make the better reissues, IMHO) tend to use 180 and 200 gram vinyl. The problem with using that as a benchmark is that a lot of non-audiophile companies, who use CDs as masters, also tout their use of heavy vinyl (one common hype sticker, used by the very worst companies, says something like "180 gram--good enough for audiophiles!"). For most new music releases, you usually won't have any choices, and have to hope that the record is mastered and manufactured with care. For reissues of popular older albums, on the other hand, you may be inundated with choices. Unfortunately, in my experience, the better choices for the latter tend to be the more expensive ones, coming from companies that use mainly analog sources and cutting (such as MFSL, Analogue Productions, ORG Music, and Speakers Corner). The phrase "all analog chain," as well as a named mastering engineer, should be more significant than the thickness of the vinyl. As always, though, there are exceptions, and YMMV, and all that.
    The only thing 180g vinyl adds to is the shipping costs Mark nails it here, pay more attention to the source than the packaging.

  8. #1183
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pr33t View Post
    The only thing 180g vinyl adds to is the shipping costs Mark nails it here, pay more attention to the source than the packaging.
    Don't agree. The quality of the vinyl goes towards the longevity of the sound quality.
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  9. #1184
    False Number 9 Pr33t's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Firth View Post
    Don't agree. The quality of the vinyl goes towards the longevity of the sound quality.
    The weight of the vinyl has nothing to do with the quality.

  10. #1185
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    I agree that the weight has nothing to do with the quality of the pressing. I have had some horrible pressings on 180g.
    Think of a book as a vase, and a movie as the stained-glass window that the filmmaker has made out of the pieces after hes smashed it with a hammer.
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  11. #1186
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    I thought that the thicker the vinyl, the less likely it would warp.
    Compact Disk brought high fidelity to the masses and audiophiles will never forgive it for that

  12. #1187
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pr33t View Post
    The weight of the vinyl has nothing to do with the quality.
    You don't get my post[emoji848]
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  13. #1188
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    Quote Originally Posted by rottersclub View Post
    I agree that the weight has nothing to do with the quality of the pressing. I have had some horrible pressings on 180g.
    People can buy lemon autos too, but it has nothing to do with 180g.
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  14. #1189
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    There are several factors which are involved in producing an audiophile vinyl recording.

    1. Recording at 45 RPM
    2. Virgin vinyl
    3. Heavier vinyl will maintain integrity over time.
    4. Good master, preferably half speed

    Look at some of these:
    http://www.vinylvinyl.nl/tags/quality-record-pressing/
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  15. #1190
    Member rottersclub's Avatar
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    Did anyone ever buy the 2 LP version of Radiohead - OK Computer on Parlaphone (can't remember the pressing plant)? It was dreadful. By far the noisiest "audiophile" LP I ever bought. In fact, it deterred me from spending wildly on 180g vinyl for a while.
    Think of a book as a vase, and a movie as the stained-glass window that the filmmaker has made out of the pieces after hes smashed it with a hammer.
    -- Russell Banks (paraphrased)

  16. #1191
    No, but I chanced upon one or two of those Yes repressings on Friday music. Yuck.
    "Always ready with the ray of sunshine"

  17. #1192
    False Number 9 Pr33t's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Firth View Post
    You don't get my post[emoji848]
    No, I don't, since you seem to be equating that heavier vinyl is automatically better. This is not true. I think we might be arguing two separate points here...


    Quote Originally Posted by Firth View Post
    There are several factors which are involved in producing an audiophile vinyl recording.

    1. Recording at 45 RPM
    2. Virgin vinyl
    3. Heavier vinyl will maintain integrity over time.
    4. Good master, preferably half speed

    Look at some of these:
    http://www.vinylvinyl.nl/tags/quality-record-pressing/
    Again, you seem to be implying that any 180g vinyl is audiophile quality. This is categorically untrue. Mark was discussing specifically how non-audiophile releases take advantage of the perception that 180g is somehow inherently superior:

    Quote Originally Posted by NorthNY Mark View Post
    In general, the thickness of the vinyl will have little effect on sound, though the audiophile companies (which usually make the better reissues, IMHO) tend to use 180 and 200 gram vinyl. The problem with using that as a benchmark is that a lot of non-audiophile companies, who use CDs as masters, also tout their use of heavy vinyl (one common hype sticker, used by the very worst companies, says something like "180 gram--good enough for audiophiles!").

    I also take issue with #3 on your list - do you have evidence of this? If you're simply talking about warping, I don't think this is a valid point. Environmental and care factors are what play into this. Something that weighs 100g and is cared for and stored properly will keep the same integrity as a 180g record.

  18. #1193
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    Quote Originally Posted by Firth View Post
    Don't agree. The quality of the vinyl goes towards the longevity of the sound quality.
    Don't forget, it also adds the magic surface noise to music sourced from a CD, which lacks that important factor.

  19. #1194
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pr33t View Post
    No, I don't, since you seem to be equating that heavier vinyl is automatically better. This is not true. I think we might be arguing two separate points here...




    Again, you seem to be implying that any 180g vinyl is audiophile quality. This is categorically untrue. Mark was discussing specifically how non-audiophile releases take advantage of the perception that 180g is somehow inherently superior:




    I also take issue with #3 on your list - do you have evidence of this? If you're simply talking about warping, I don't think this is a valid point. Environmental and care factors are what play into this. Something that weighs 100g and is cared for and stored properly will keep the same integrity as a 180g record.
    I never said that 180g was a god send to vinyl audio. On the other hand, I wouldn't reject it because it was 180g. The moronic discussion implies that you better be suspicious of 180g vinyl. You can get a lemon production on any format. My Billy Joel SACD sucks. Of course care of vinyl is important[emoji11]
    Artists and dreamers and thinkers
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  20. #1195
    Santa brought me a new subwoofer cable. Woo-hoo. And an original Sonet pressing of Tasavallan Presidentti's Lambert Land. WOO-HOO!
    "Always ready with the ray of sunshine"

  21. #1196
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    Quote Originally Posted by strawberrybrick View Post
    Santa brought me a new subwoofer cable. Woo-hoo.
    Woo-hoo, or just woo?

  22. #1197
    Quote Originally Posted by Firth View Post
    I never said that 180g was a god send to vinyl audio. On the other hand, I wouldn't reject it because it was 180g. The moronic discussion implies that you better be suspicious of 180g vinyl. You can get a lemon production on any format. My Billy Joel SACD sucks. Of course care of vinyl is important[emoji11]
    Not that 180G is bad in any way, but something to consider: when he was putting together Arve Henriksen's vinyl-only Solidification box (seven LPs + DVDs with high res, MP3 and WAV formats), Rune Grammofon head Rune Kristoffersen investigated what weight of vinyl would be best for the box (given the mastering was going to be superlative, as it always is with Helge Sten aka Deathprod). He could find no empirical substantiation that demonstrated 180G as being in any way superior to 150G, so he went with 150G. With 30G shaved off of seven LPs, that's 210G, which helped significantly in postage costs.

    A certain weight of vinyl is clearly needed, but whether 180G (or beyond; I'm now seeing some advertised at 200G) is the benchmark or not seems, at the very least, to be up in the air.

  23. #1198
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Woo-hoo, or just woo?
    Probably the latter...

  24. #1199
    Quote Originally Posted by Buddhabreath View Post
    Probably the latter...
    Woo-hoo, it's longer which allows me to move the location of the subwoofer. BTW, Lambert Land is a gem of an album.
    "Always ready with the ray of sunshine"

  25. #1200
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    Where are you moving the subwoofer to?

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