Thread: The Audiophile Thread

  1. #726
    Member Staun's Avatar
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    I must admit that I'm still fascinated with the audio equipment from the mid 70's. Those big heavy silver faced boxes with big knobs and switches, they look so cool. But what was the idea behind the s shaped tone arms for the TT? I'm sure it had to do with tracking, but the curve was always to the right. Did this not produce some type of waited drag? Also, one of the great speakers of the time was the JBL 100. I knew a guy who had a pair once but I don't think he has them anymore. They were called bookshelf speakers but to me they looked like smaller floor standing speakers and abit to large for a usual shelf. It had the usual cube look which we all know isn't the best of designs. So, in making speakers then, what did they get right?
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  2. #727
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    JBL's were all about dynamics, and toneality. They have a high sensitivity that let both macro and micro dynamics shine through, makign the music sound more live and real than most overdamped speakers.

    I grew up in the age of those multi-knobed boxes. Yeah, they were industrial tool-looking and complex with analogue adjustability. Now all that complexity is done digitally and hidden behind multi-menues on your home theater receiver.

    As for S shaped tonearms, a good tonearm is a good tonearm. Shape is one of the least important factors in design. Lots of theories like, S shape adds mass, the design is done to compensate for torque, straight arms are more rigid, S shape arms add length, etc. The bottom line is more modern arms are straight. It is likely easier to make a straight arm and it's also a matter of current fashion.
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  3. #728
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    I understan that even today, JBL low freq drivers are still very good. Is this true?
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  4. #729
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    Lets just say, there's a reason the high end JBL's, vintage or otherwise, still command the prices they do.
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  5. #730
    I still have a vintage stereo or two, of note are Epicure 100's and a Harmon Kardon 330B. Fun stuff.
    "Always ready with the ray of sunshine"

  6. #731
    Member Staun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by strawberrybrick View Post
    I still have a vintage stereo or two, of note are Epicure 100's and a Harmon Kardon 330B. Fun stuff.
    Strange, the vintage stuff here flies off the shelves.
    The older I get, the better I was.

  7. #732
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    I've mostly been a cable agnostic, but I'm tempted to audition a few brands to see if I can hear differences. There is a company that will lend you cables to audition in your home for a 5% fee that can go towards the purchase of cables. http://www.thecableco.com/ Has anyone dealt with this particular company?

  8. #733
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    The Cable Co are great to deal with. I've bought from them and I know a number of people who have used them to audition cables.

  9. #734
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    Looking at DACs right now and tell me if I understand this correctly. You run a USB cable to a DAC and then RCA cords to your receiver/amp/pre-amp. My amplifier doesn't accept any other inputs than RCA-type jacks but it was bought in the OOs. I assume that the newer amps have HDMI inputs or something else, right?
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  10. #735
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    DACs typically have multiple input choices: USB, SPDIF, AES/EBU. You would connect the DAC to your receiver via single ended (RCA) or balanced (XLR) cables.

    For the most part you only see HDMI input on AV receivers. Not two channel.

  11. #736
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    OK. No XLR input on my amp so that simplifies that. What about a wireless signal either to or from a DAC, is that done and is fidelity lost if you do that?
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  12. #737
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    Uh boy...now you went and opened a can of worms or two. Check please!

  13. #738
    OK, show some of your favorite gear from the past.
    For my first stereo, I opted for a integrated amplifier. This is not my video, btw.

  14. #739
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jubal View Post
    OK, show some of your favorite gear from the past.
    For my first stereo, I opted for a integrated amplifier. This is not my video, btw.
    Love looking at this vintage stuff.
    The older I get, the better I was.

  15. #740
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    Quote Originally Posted by LASERCD View Post
    Uh boy...now you went and opened a can of worms or two. Check please!
    Like I haven't served canned worms before in this thread?
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  16. #741
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    My preamp has settings for MC carts which have been made. When I install a new phono stage and make the proper settings, what should the original settings be on the preamp? Since the dedicated phono stage will be much better than the stage in the preamp, how do I stop a conflict?
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  17. #742
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    Laser, Bob, I decided to go with a new phono stage first then replace the preamp.
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  18. #743
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    Staun, if you are running your turntable to a standalone phono amp, then you would not run it's output into the phono input on your amp/receiver. Rather you ought to run it into a normal set of jacks like AUX or DVD. The phono amp will handle the step up and the RIAA curve so it would get messed up if you ran that feed into the built-in phono stage in your amp/receiver.
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  19. #744
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    Quote Originally Posted by rottersclub View Post
    Staun, if you are running your turntable to a standalone phono amp, then you would not run it's output into the phono input on your amp/receiver. Rather you ought to run it into a normal set of jacks like AUX or DVD. The phono amp will handle the step up and the RIAA curve so it would get messed up if you ran that feed into the built-in phono stage in your amp/receiver.
    Aux it is. Resolved. Looking at several tubed stages and I want to decide quite soon. There are so many, is there anything I should certainly stay away from? Also, I will still have to update the preamp, it would seem that I should also look at tubes in that area over SS. Would this be overkill?
    The older I get, the better I was.

  20. #745
    My NAD receiver, that I still use - just checked - is 24 years old. Apart from the volume knob being scratchy, it works perfect. I use the volume on my Oppo remote, so it's not an issue.
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  21. #746
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    Quote Originally Posted by Staun View Post
    Aux it is. Resolved. Looking at several tubed stages and I want to decide quite soon. There are so many, is there anything I should certainly stay away from? Also, I will still have to update the preamp, it would seem that I should also look at tubes in that area over SS. Would this be overkill?
    Since you haven't mentioned which tube phono stages you are looking at its impossible to tell you what to stay away from. Tubes vs solid state is a matter of preference. Get a loaner and see what mates with your Boulder monoblocks. As I mentioned the 810 is the perfect mate and would be my immediate choice.

  22. #747
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dean Watson View Post
    My NAD receiver, that I still use - just checked - is 24 years old. Apart from the volume knob being scratchy, it works perfect. I use the volume on my Oppo remote, so it's not an issue.
    Did you ever compare sending full gain out of the Oppo and using the NAD receiver's volume knob vs using the Oppo remote?

  23. #748
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    Staun, I will defer to others here to speak to your questions/musings about tubes. I subscribe to the no-muss no-fuss school of life and it seems to me that tubes are for people who don't mind fiddling with things (biasing, rolling, etc.). There are some who think that introducing tubes in one component is sufficient to getting the sound they're after. So going with a tubed preamp and a SS power amp might be a good approach. I've also heard of others who have bought a tubed CD player and used SS amps.
    Think of a book as a vase, and a movie as the stained-glass window that the filmmaker has made out of the pieces after hes smashed it with a hammer.
    -- Russell Banks (paraphrased)

  24. #749
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    Quote Originally Posted by LASERCD View Post
    Since you haven't mentioned which tube phono stages you are looking at its impossible to tell you what to stay away from. Tubes vs solid state is a matter of preference. Get a loaner and see what mates with your Boulder monoblocks. As I mentioned the 810 is the perfect mate and would be my immediate choice.
    I think I mentioned the Whest PS.30RDT, to you at one time. It's not a tubed unit but from all the reviews I've read from some well know audio mags, it gets a thumbs up. A good price point since I've decided to get a good phono stage before a preamp. Maybe you could name a couple of companies that excel in phono stages. Since I listen to so much vinyl, maybe I should stick with tubes.
    The older I get, the better I was.

  25. #750
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    Quote Originally Posted by rottersclub View Post
    Staun, I will defer to others here to speak to your questions/musings about tubes. I subscribe to the no-muss no-fuss school of life and it seems to me that tubes are for people who don't mind fiddling with things (biasing, rolling, etc.). There are some who think that introducing tubes in one component is sufficient to getting the sound they're after. So going with a tubed preamp and a SS power amp might be a good approach. I've also heard of others who have bought a tubed CD player and used SS amps.
    I understand what your saying and thanks. I'm coming from the approach, and I've alway been told that, if your a vinyl listner, tubes are the way to go. Nothing wrong with SS, but tubes produce a better sound for vinyl. Yes, I've also been told that tubes have their own little quirks but for vinyl, it's still the way to go. Guess I'm still trying to unpack this issue since I'm on the verge of getting a new phono stage. Lots to consider and I want to make somewhat of an educated decision. Staying out of the black hole.
    The older I get, the better I was.

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