Thread: Classical music

  1. #726
    Par Lindh's very credible Classical composition:

    http://www.crimsonic.se/listen/?fbcl...8Y736vNYZWUGAk

  2. #727
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
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    ^^ Par Lindh's preference for Baroque era music certainly shines through in this work.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  3. #728
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    Terje Rypdal goes classic


  4. #729
    Member hippypants's Avatar
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    Harley Gaber


  5. #730
    The Gaber reminds me of the Ira J Mowitz disc I was spinning last night -


  6. #731
    KrimsonCat MissKittysMom's Avatar
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    Outstanding performance of Copland's Appalachian Spring:



    This was written in collaboration with Martha Graham as a modern dance. Here's the dance, with Martha Graham as the lead:

    I think the subtext is rapidly becoming text.

  7. #732
    Member hFx's Avatar
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    My Progressive Workshop at http://soundcloud.com/hfxx

  8. #733
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    Psalm från Älvdals-Åsen (Sweden)


  9. #734
    Lucky Man
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    Any love for Haydn?

    Have become enamored of the London Symphonies, amongst other things. He was so prolific!

    Franz Joseph, that is. lol
    Perhaps finding the happy medium is harder than we know.

  10. #735
    Member StarThrower's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frankh View Post
    Any love for Haydn?

    Have become enamored of the London Symphonies, amongst other things. He was so prolific!

    Franz Joseph, that is. lol
    Not a big fan but among the symphonies there are many beautiful movements. I like some of the masses as well. I have a set of string quartets but nothing has really grabbed my ear yet. But in general I don't listen to a lot of classical era music.

  11. #736
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    I like that Martin Frost. Time to go exploring.
    "If you want to see the true nature of humanity, just look at the internet."

    http://www.discogs.com/user/moecurlythanu/collection

  12. #737
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frankh View Post
    Any love for Haydn?

    Have become enamored of the London Symphonies, amongst other things. He was so prolific!

    Franz Joseph, that is. lol
    He's perhaps my least favorite. While his contemporaries began to experiment on the verge of the romantic era, Haydn in his isolation maintained full classicism. In case you haven't guessed, I too consider classical era classical completely forgettable.

    EDIT: That being said, there is one debt we owe Haydn...the invention of the string quartet.
    Last edited by progmatist; 1 Week Ago at 04:05 PM.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  13. #738
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    Quote Originally Posted by StarThrower View Post
    Not a big fan but among the symphonies there are many beautiful movements. I like some of the masses as well. I have a set of string quartets but nothing has really grabbed my ear yet. But in general I don't listen to a lot of classical era music.
    I have a complete set of the masses and love them.

  14. #739
    I recommend Symphony 88 for Haydn. Pretty cool, and even hints toward the next era, a little.

    Mostly, the actual Classical era is not my bag, but the Beethoven symphonies are pretty freakin' killer.

  15. #740
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick L. View Post

    Mostly, the actual Classical era is not my bag, but the Beethoven symphonies are pretty freakin' killer.
    The last cycle I picked up conducted by Skrowaczewski is superb! It's on the Oehms label. I also have his Bruckner cycle which is equally as good. The Beethoven set is now hard to find but it's included in the Skrowaczewski 90th Birthday Collection box.

  16. #741
    I've actually had the complete Mackerras set of the Beethoven symphonies on EMI for years. Haven't pulled it out in a while, though.

  17. #742
    Member StarThrower's Avatar
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    Haven't hear Mackerras Beethoven but I have some of his Janacek, and Martinu. I've been into Otto Klemperer lately. I picked up his Wagner/Strauss set on Warner Classics. Great stuff! Mostly all instrumental but it includes Act I of Die Walkure which is the best I've heard. The guy was a master of the German/Austrian repertoire.

  18. #743
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick L. View Post
    Mostly, the actual Classical era is not my bag, but the Beethoven symphonies are pretty freakin' killer.
    While Beethoven was technically a classical era composer, he defined the romantic style.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  19. #744
    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    While Beethoven was technically a classical era composer, he defined the romantic style.
    Yup.

  20. #745
    KrimsonCat MissKittysMom's Avatar
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    Technically, Beethoven was a transitional composer. He studied under Haydn, who (along with Mozart) defined the classical era. Beethoven studied under Haydn, but had a falling out with the master when Haydn left to work in London. It was traditional to dedicate your Opus 1 compositions to your mentor, but Beethoven refused to do that. (And those Opus 1 piano trios are unmistakably Beethoven.) For some decades after his death, the late Beethoven works (quartets and piano sonatas, particularly) were considered inferior and a sign of Beethoven's mental deterioration.

    One could make a case for Schubert beginning the romantic era; he invented the German art song as a form. And for Chopin, with his Polish nationalism and promotion of new forms such as the nocturne (invented by the Irish composer John Field). Liszt began the transition from romanticism to modernism and away from traditional tonality.
    I think the subtext is rapidly becoming text.

  21. #746
    Member StarThrower's Avatar
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    It's been said that the Symphonie Fantastique by Berlioz was the first major romantic work. It's at least one of them.

  22. #747
    This is an example of modern piano music that I do not care for - anything that sounds like something I could create without any formal piano lessons gets a thumbs down from me


  23. #748
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MissKittysMom View Post
    One could make a case for Schubert beginning the romantic era; he invented the German art song as a form. And for Chopin, with his Polish nationalism and promotion of new forms such as the nocturne (invented by the Irish composer John Field). Liszt began the transition from romanticism to modernism and away from traditional tonality.
    Schubert put the actual "romance" in the romantic era, penning literally hundreds of love songs.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  24. #749
    Quote Originally Posted by Proglodite View Post
    This is an example of modern piano music that I do not care for - anything that sounds like something I could create without any formal piano lessons gets a thumbs down from me


    I have no problem hearing a very high level of piano technique and organized composition in that piece.
    And if there were a god, I think it very unlikely that he would have such an uneasy vanity as to be offended by those who doubt His existence - Russell

  25. #750
    Quote Originally Posted by simon moon View Post
    I have no problem hearing a very high level of piano technique and organized composition in that piece.
    To each their own - there's some early Magnus Lindberg that I really enjoy that would drive some people up the wall! --Peter

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