Page 7 of 23 FirstFirst 1234567891011121314151617181920212223 LastLast
Results 151 to 175 of 567

Thread: Classical music

  1. #151
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Mesa, Arizona
    Posts
    998
    As long as we're on a Sibelius binge......

    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  2. #152
    Member Rick Robson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Rio de Janeiro
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    As long as we're on a Sibelius binge......

    As far as Sibelius interpretations, there are sure so many outstanding recordings. But when it comes to his orchestral works, very few are on the W.Furtwangler's league. His interpretations of Sibelius 'En Saga' tone poem and the Violin Concerto has been my favourites, absolutely exhilarating!
    Last edited by Rick Robson; 08-23-2016 at 06:51 PM. Reason: As long as replaced by As far as
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  3. #153
    Member Rick Robson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Rio de Janeiro
    Posts
    87
    Sibelius "En Saga op 9", Wilhelm Furtwängler, 1950

    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  4. #154
    Discovered this one recently.


  5. #155
    Holst "The Planets" was very influential to the world of Prog musicians. The influence is often pointed in the direction of King Crimson for their take on Mercury,, The Bringer Of War...but then take notice of the intro to "The Prophet " by Yes, " Joybringer. by Manfred Mann, and a few signature lines in songs by Renaissance and Lucifer's Friend. Some of these examples are just outright silly but everyone seemed to borrow from The Planets. There are many more examples and you have to observe closely to hear it.

  6. #156
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Mesa, Arizona
    Posts
    998
    ^^The Planets was the influence for the song Black Sabbath. Geezer was messing around playing Mars, Tony put his own spin on it, and that became THE riff.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  7. #157
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Hudson Valley, NY
    Posts
    3,376
    Shostakovich 4, 6, and 10

  8. #158
    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    ^^The Planets was the influence for the song Black Sabbath. Geezer was messing around playing Mars, Tony put his own spin on it, and that became THE riff.
    Interesting!

  9. #159
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Philadelphia Area
    Posts
    1,007
    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    ^^The Planets was the influence for the song Black Sabbath. Geezer was messing around playing Mars, Tony put his own spin on it, and that became THE riff.
    I'm going to have to play this because for the life of me I don't get any connection between the two.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  10. #160
    Anybody have any experience with Tilson Thomas and Gershwin?

    Bernstein seems to be regarded by most as the go-to for Gershwin, but I've read some really encouraging things about Michael Tilson Thomas in this regard. Is there anybody familiar with both who could offer a comparison?

    Thanks.

  11. #161
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Mesa, Arizona
    Posts
    998
    Quote Originally Posted by Fracktured View Post
    I'm going to have to play this because for the life of me I don't get any connection between the two.
    You only have to listen to the first three melody notes of Mars, layered on top of the opening ostinato.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  12. #162
    Quote Originally Posted by Fracktured View Post
    I'm going to have to play this because for the life of me I don't get any connection between the two.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Most likely the usage of the tri tone interval which was evident on In The Court Of The Crimson King, however Tony Iommi simplified the idea of it to back a vocal in the verse of a Rock song. The notes in the song "Black Sabbath" are basically the same as "Mars the Bringer of War" but not rhythmically played the same. Perhaps Iommi adapted the idea itself for a Rock song...but it was not noticeable and somewhat masked behind the different approach to a different style of music completely. Music that was a thousand light years from sounding Classical, but revealed the possibility of borrowing some of it's note passages in order to alter the sound in Rock.

  13. #163
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Posts
    3,455

  14. #164
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Philadelphia Area
    Posts
    1,007
    Quote Originally Posted by Zeuhlmate View Post
    First Opera me and my brother ever went to see at the Met in NY. James Levine conducting. One of the longest nights of my life. Love this opera, but seeing it performed live was a test of perseverance.

  15. #165
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Philadelphia Area
    Posts
    1,007
    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    You only have to listen to the first three melody notes of Mars, layered on top of the opening ostinato.
    I get it now, but still seems a little far fetched to me. I thought I heard where the first three notes in Black Sabbath were somehow tired to a satanic ritual or something to that effect. Could Holst have used this for the bringer of war theme of Mars? Now that would make sense to me.

  16. #166
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Posts
    3,455
    Quote Originally Posted by Fracktured View Post
    First Opera me and my brother ever went to see at the Met in NY. James Levine conducting. One of the longest nights of my life. Love this opera, but seeing it performed live was a test of perseverance.
    My wife went to se The Flying Dutchman yesterday, and at times had similar thoughts.

  17. #167
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Mesa, Arizona
    Posts
    998
    Quote Originally Posted by Fracktured View Post
    I get it now, but still seems a little far fetched to me. I thought I heard where the first three notes in Black Sabbath were somehow tired to a satanic ritual or something to that effect. Could Holst have used this for the bringer of war theme of Mars? Now that would make sense to me.
    The flat 5th has traditionally been thought of as "the Devil's 5th."
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  18. #168
    Member Rick Robson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Rio de Janeiro
    Posts
    87


    Symphonie fantastique... sans doute!

    PS: That was Igor Markevitch's vibrant debut recording on DG.
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  19. #169
    Member Rick Robson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Rio de Janeiro
    Posts
    87


    This literally mind blowing piece just got me wondering what on earth Beethoven did get inspiration from. interestingly, he composed this 'theme-and-variations' piece just before his Symphony No. 3 'Eroica', composed the following year, with the variations in the Eroica Symphony following that same pattern.
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  20. #170
    Member Rick Robson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Rio de Janeiro
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Robson View Post
    Zimerman has ultimately been among my very favourite pianists, and this recording of the 24 Debussy's Preludes is just exhilarating too!
    Being struck again by the strong escapism of the Romantic Era music is to me essentially like one of the most viciously joyful trips that puts me down when it finally comes to an end. So, from time to time I need to come back to those musics, as to breathing some fresh air again.

    It couldn't have begun better today without Krystian Zimerman pulling off a freakin' overwhelming interpretation of such a classic Romantic Era piece that countless times has literally blown me far away from here. Kudos to Zimerman!.. I can feel he expressing his fervorous and restless love for this music on each and every key he presses...... on every move he makes in front of the Piano...

    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  21. #171
    Two things I discovered today

    Something sounds familiar, but I don't know where I've heard it before


    The first one is also played with a Chinese orchestra

  22. #172
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Posts
    3,455
    ANGELIQUE KIDJO - RAVEL'S BOLERO


  23. #173
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    5,728
    Angelique Kidjo is da bomb, I've loved her for years!

  24. #174
    Beautiful work for brass, winds, and percussion.



    Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, conductor: Myung-Whun Chung

  25. #175
    Boo! walt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Oakland Gardens NY
    Posts
    4,352
    Quote Originally Posted by Reid View Post
    Beautiful work for brass, winds, and percussion.



    Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, conductor: Myung-Whun Chung
    Co-signed.
    "please do not understand me too quickly"-andre gide

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •