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Thread: Classical music

  1. #126
    Member Rick Robson's Avatar
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    Interesting how Mozart music will always be one of the perfect Classical examples of immortality throughout time, even more on such a today's reality that doesn't care much for that traditional Classical Music typical magnification of emotions and sentimentality through their memorable and immortal melodies. There will always be those who slate these kinds of overt displays of sentimentality, but I am among those permanently enthralled.

    And my thoughts about Mozart didn't change much since I began listening to him, but I've noticed on non-classical forums that today's general consensus about most of his music has been pretty much "take it or leave it" - people either love it or just don't care for (or dislike) it. Personally I don't feel that way, he is a genius still today, even if he was not a revolutionary on building new forms/structures into his music. And it's better so if he didn't care for bringing new sounds or experimentation either, because he was a great master in composing majestic melodic lines harmonically perfect, all often of sheer beauty. IMO, one of his "thumbprints" are those such a manic fluctuations between damn inward-looking melancholy and pure joy... incredibly without any sort of weight......just a matter of genius indeed.
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  2. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fracktured View Post
    I listened yo Bernstein's version of Mahler's 9th the other day and it just blows me away every time I hear it.
    Same on here, perhaps the 9th is my fave too, but I find his Adagietto from Symphony No.5 spiritual at the same breath, also highly recommended.

    This is my favourite recording of the 9th:

    Gustav Mahler.jpg
    Bruno Walter's '38 recording w/ VPO
    Last edited by Rick Robson; 06-11-2016 at 04:46 PM.
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  3. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by cannygoodlike View Post
    Playing Mahler's 9th at the minute (Rattle) and just thinking that the adagio in particular could very well be my favourite piece of music.
    Agreed, Bernstein's interpretation is very good indeed, but when Mahler is concerned, particularly, Bruno Walter, James Levine, Claudio Abbado and Fritz Reiner are excellent, imo.
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  4. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fracktured View Post
    I've been on a Mahler kick lately. Played the 2nd yesterday. He was an incredible composer. The only symphony by him that I'm not crazy over is the 4th.
    I love the 7th as well, particularly its strongly Malehrian introspective and meditative spirit, emotionally dark and intense, characteristics which I personally feel even more further developed on his 9th.
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  5. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by saucyjackstl View Post
    Tchaikovsky 6th, nicknamed the Pathetic because it didn't follow a normal structure. It is brilliant.
    And this music speaks for itself, it is one of the most emotionally dramatic works I've ever known of in all music, for me it is one of the most originally written masterworks in the entire symphonic orchestral repertoire, and emotionally always an extremely powerful experience to listen to.

    Just a trivia: the Pathetic was the last of Tchaikovsky's compositions to be performed in his lifetime, and incidentally 'death' was the original title that Tchaikowsky one time suggested for its last movement. He suggested titles for the others movements of that Symphony as well, but then decided that he did not want to put into the score.
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  6. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Robson View Post
    Same on here, perhaps the 9th is my fave too, but I find his Adagietto from Symphony No.5 spiritual at the same breath, also highly recommended.

    This is my favourite recording of the 9th:

    Gustav Mahler.jpg
    Bruno Walter's '38 recording w/ VPO
    I have several recordings of the 9th but this one I've never heard. Sounds like I should pursue this.



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  7. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fracktured View Post
    I have several recordings of the 9th but this one I've never heard. Sounds like I should pursue this.



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    , you can't go wrong with it, Bruno Walter is very, very good with Mahler, and besides that '38 live recording that I mentioned, his late 1950s studio recording of the 9th is well worth your time too.
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  8. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Robson View Post
    , you can't go wrong with it, Bruno Walter is very, very good with Mahler, and besides that '38 live recording that I mentioned, his late 1950s studio recording of the 9th is well worth your time too.
    I have several recordings made by Walter and find them all very well done. His conducting always to me seemed conventional but top notch and with a lot of passion.


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    Last edited by Fracktured; 06-11-2016 at 06:16 PM.

  9. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Robson View Post
    Bruno Walter is very, very good with Mahler

  10. #135
    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Robson View Post
    I love the 7th as well, particularly its strongly Malehrian introspective and meditative spirit, emotionally dark and intense, characteristics which I personally feel even more further developed on his 9th.
    I've loved some Mahler symphonies for decades now but I only 'got' the 7th in the last few years. In fact it was someone here on PE who recommended trying the Gielen and that's when it finally clicked for me. I still find the final movement somehow not quite on the same level as the first four movements but those four are sublime.

  11. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by cannygoodlike View Post
    I've loved some Mahler symphonies for decades now but I only 'got' the 7th in the last few years. In fact it was someone here on PE who recommended trying the Gielen and that's when it finally clicked for me. I still find the final movement somehow not quite on the same level as the first four movements but those four are sublime.
    Yep, I've read somewhere that Gielen's No. 7 is by far his highlight, but also that he's a lyrical Mahler interpreter. Another different perspective indeed, as Mahler's symphonies have a lot of interesting details. I consider myself a fan of the "wallow in angst" style of Mahler. Thus, it will be actually interesting to hear a "neutral' Mahler set, but so far I didn't have a chance yet to try Gielen's.
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  12. #137
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    Just enthraled by a recent discovery: Bartok's Quintet for String Quartet and Piano (BB33). The tube below features as a plus Sviatoslav Richter, a pianist who IMO is really among the GREAT ones!

    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  13. #138
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    Funny, I'm just never, never fed up with any of my favourite music when the hard times are really turning every problem striking painful to deal with.
    It's just when it kind of says to me _"Hey, I know pretty well people's life drama... how damn fragile we are.... that's why I'm here........just to comfort your heart and spirit."
    And I'll will ALWAYS respond: _"I'm so damn grateful that you exist!... I don't even dare to wonder what would be my fate without you..."
    Then again I recall what Beethoven once said: "_I will seize fate by the throat; it shall certainly never wholly overcome me."
    Thank you so much my master of masters... for your optimism reflected on your music!







    WOW.. just wonderfu! , so great to be taken away from this damn world!... But hey! , damn I can't believe it was only for a few more than an hour time..... I was sure it was for eternity while it last
    Last edited by Rick Robson; 09-27-2016 at 03:30 PM.
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  14. #139
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    What a passionate, heroic ending, for a final movement of a masterpiece! Whatever it might sound to anybody, it couldn't be more evident its damn 'exultant' strength! , even on an overwhelming dramatic and dark atmosphere so beautifully expressed throughout this Piano Sonata.

    P.S.: Charles Rosen, american pianist and writer on music, stated that this Piano Sonata's 3rd. movement is the first time in the history of music where the academic devices of counterpoint and fugue are integral to a composition's drama, and observes that Beethoven in this work does not "simply represent the return to life, but persuades us physically of the process".
    Rosen is renowned for recording various 20th century works at the invitation of composers such as Igor Stravinsky - Movements for Piano and Orchestra, and Pierre Boulez - complete works for piano.
    His recordings also include earlier literature such as Debussy's Études (1958), Schumann's works for solo piano, Beethoven's late sonatas and Diabelli Variations, and Bach's Art of Fugue and Goldberg Variations.
    Last edited by Rick Robson; 07-23-2016 at 05:02 PM.
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  15. #140
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    The great interpreter always adds some new 'flare' to the innumerable nuances of any masterpiece.....literally on every new performance! That's the genius Martha...
    Last edited by Rick Robson; 12-20-2016 at 01:35 PM.
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  16. #141
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    Another masterpiece that screams for a legendary interpreter........Ashkenazy plays the hell out of it!
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  17. #142
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    So great...........this is fckn' exhilarating! And I believe that still today very few can fully comprehend the GRANDEUR of this gem, as well as the other two Beethoven's "Razumovsky" string quartets.
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  18. #143
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    [QUOTE=Rick Robson;601952]

    Other than the memorable Romantic Era stuff for piano, I also go for these beautiful works, my fave Debussy's pieces which no doubt are also among the all-time masterpieces ever written: 12 Čtudes for Piano. For those who want just other than the common reference recordings, I highly recommend Maurizio Pollini's - just TOP-notch!



    But I've recently been excited with my new just enthralling discovery!



    Zimerman has ultimately been among my very favourite pianists, and this recording of the 24 Debussy's Preludes is just exhilarating too!
    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  19. #144
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    This fantastic violinist is just a splendorous show of talent!!



    Her interpretation of Bartok is just TOP-NOTCH! Indeed a 'must have' recording.

    "Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. ". Ludwig van Beethoven

  20. #145
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cannygoodlike View Post
    I've loved some Mahler symphonies for decades now but I only 'got' the 7th in the last few years. In fact it was someone here on PE who recommended trying the Gielen and that's when it finally clicked for me. I still find the final movement somehow not quite on the same level as the first four movements but those four are sublime.
    Could have been me - not sure - but I do own the Gielen set and love it from time-to-time. The last movement is probably the most lightweight "emotionally speaking", but I have grown to love it. But yes, if I had to choose a least favorite mvt of that symphony, its it.

    Are you into the other symphonies or just digging the 7th right now?

  21. #146
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    Been on a YUUUUUUUGGGGGEEEE Sibelius binge over the past 4-5 years now. Went on major Sibelius CD buying binges and listens for months at a poke. Should probably start a dedicated Sibelius thread at some point but I'm too lazy I guess. At one point, I would have never considered JS on the same artistic level as Mahler, but these days I do and almost enjoy his music more at times. Definitely a Top 10 composer and maybe he has even found his way into my top 5, its too hard to objectively state this.

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  23. #148
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    ^ Reidster - great piece! I know it but haven't heard it in at least 3-4 years - nice one mate!

  24. #149
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    For those of you unfamiliar with Sibelius, try this out. I can unequivocally say that I would die a happy person if I could listen to this piece of music every day for the rest of my life.

  25. #150
    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    ^ Reidster - great piece! I know it but haven't heard it in at least 3-4 years - nice one mate!
    I was revisiting the symphonies over the weekend, and then somebody uploaded the double concerto on Facebook. I think it's great! There's a budget recording on the Alto label. I'm gonna pick it up.

    I haven't been totally consumed by Sibelius yet, but I do listen to my symphony cycle by Berglund. Also thinking of grabbing that Barshai Shostakovich set. I'm going out to hear the piano quintet Thursday night.

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