Thread: Classical music

  1. #1026
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    Quote Originally Posted by wideopenears View Post
    Brahms Requiem=awesomeness.
    Everything by Brahms that Iíve ever heard is awesome. One of the all time greatest.

  2. #1027
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fracktured View Post
    Everything by Brahms that I’ve ever heard is awesome. One of the all time greatest.
    Ironically, he was vehemently opposed to the entire romantic movement, but his own style was very much romantic.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  3. #1028
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    Quote Originally Posted by wideopenears View Post
    Brahms Requiem=awesomeness.
    I remember hearing that main theme from the 2nd mvt (II. Denn alles...) from Brahms Requiem used in a Nazi documentary - and it sounded so fucking evil and ominous in that context.

    I played this piece in my college orchestra when I was a freshman (string bass), and have loved it since.
    If it isn't Krautrock, it's krap.

    "And it's only the giving
    That makes you what you are" - Ian Anderson

  4. #1029
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick L. View Post
    Shostakovich 10 totally rocks. I a watching a live performance of his 6th right now. Paavo Jarvi and Estonian Festival Orchestra.
    2nd movement - the best! The Beast!
    If it isn't Krautrock, it's krap.

    "And it's only the giving
    That makes you what you are" - Ian Anderson

  5. #1030
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    I'm not always in the mood for string quartets, but when I am Dutilleux does the trick!

  6. #1031
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    Quote Originally Posted by thedunno View Post
    I am obsessed with this piece lately:

    Doesn't strike me as "Classical Music," but it's effin' great.
    I like the part where Icarus hijacks the Little Red Hen.

    http://www.discogs.com/user/moecurlythanu/collection

  7. #1032
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    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu View Post
    Doesn't strike me as "Classical Music," but it's effin' great.
    Its not "classic' Classical, its not modern Classical but it IS contemporary Classical. Its todays music that is composed by a young composer and played energetically by young classical trained musicians. I love this stuff and there seems to be a lot of it around lately.

  8. #1033
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    ^ Well keep posting it when you find it, please.

  9. #1034
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    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu;a1007272
    ^ Well keep posting it when you find it, please.

    Same composer (Gabrielle Smith) as Carrot revolution but different ensemble, Ymusic. I love all tunes I've heared from Gabriella Smith so far.


    For something a bit more melodic: Now Ensemble, Waiting in the rain for snow by David Crowell

  10. #1035
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    Quote Originally Posted by thedunno View Post

    For something a bit more melodic: Now Ensemble, Waiting in the rain for snow by David Crowell
    I liked this !

    And this !


  11. #1036
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  12. #1037
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    Still obsessed with DSCH 10. The Von Karajan recording is actually really good. I would guess that this music isn't in his wheelhouse but its a great recording. This is Rick's fault.

  13. #1038
    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    Still obsessed with DSCH 10. The Von Karajan recording is actually really good. I would guess that this music isn't in his wheelhouse but its a great recording. This is Rick's fault.
    HA! HAAAAAAA!

    Have you hit the Petrenko yet? His 2nd movement freakin' rips!


  14. #1039
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    I've ordered CDs by yMusic and Aizuri Quartet, (which may have been V.A.) Thanks guys.

  15. #1040
    I have listened to a bunch of Shostakovich today as well as Frank Bridge's The Sea and Two Poems for Orchestra. Great stuff.

  16. #1041
    This is pretty cool. Shostakovich String Quartet no. 8 arranged for string orchestra and timpani.




  17. #1042
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  18. #1043
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    I'm easing my way into classical. I have always listened to the 'greatest hits' kind of albums with all the pieces we've heard growing up. Holst's "Mars", Mozart's "1812 Overture" etc. Well, this week I decided to do some digging and listen to Beethoven's 9 symphonies. I listened to 1,2,5 and 6 so far. That guy was pretty good! Can't believe I'm old enough to post in the "Old Geezer" thread and haven't listened to these symphonies before.

  19. #1044
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tangram View Post
    I'm easing my way into classical. I have always listened to the 'greatest hits' kind of albums with all the pieces we've heard growing up. Holst's "Mars", Mozart's "1812 Overture" etc. Well, this week I decided to do some digging and listen to Beethoven's 9 symphonies. I listened to 1,2,5 and 6 so far. That guy was pretty good! Can't believe I'm old enough to post in the "Old Geezer" thread and haven't listened to these symphonies before.
    Mozart died in 1791, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky is probably the contender.

  20. #1045
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tangram View Post
    I'm easing my way into classical. I have always listened to the 'greatest hits' kind of albums with all the pieces we've heard growing up. Holst's "Mars", Mozart's "1812 Overture" etc. Well, this week I decided to do some digging and listen to Beethoven's 9 symphonies. I listened to 1,2,5 and 6 so far. That guy was pretty good! Can't believe I'm old enough to post in the "Old Geezer" thread and haven't listened to these symphonies before.
    Some people would want to throw large heavy objects at me for saying this, but imo there are symphonies by many other cats that are more interesting than Beethoven. Don't misunderstand me - he was brilliant and a true maverick - however if you like those you would probably love some later stuff being a prog fan. 9 is pretty amazing though, as are 3 and 7. Keep listening to this stuff though, your mind will be blown.

  21. #1046
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    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    Some people would want to throw large heavy objects at me for saying this, but imo there are symphonies by many other cats that are more interesting than Beethoven. Don't misunderstand me - he was brilliant and a true maverick - however if you like those you would probably love some later stuff being a prog fan. 9 is pretty amazing though, as are 3 and 7. Keep listening to this stuff though, your mind will be blown.
    Yes, I am searching for a heavy blunt object now.

    I know beethoven is 'da shit', he invented new ways of doing things, and renewed tons of ways to compose - and I have a musician friend who tries to push Beethoven every time we listen to music.
    But this pimp just gets vaguely interested, Dunno why.
    I like some of his piano stuff, but I don't get carried away.
    Maybe because so much music since then is built on his (and Mozarts) chords, runs, melodies, structures etc.
    He is somehow overplayed even though you haven't heard the stuff ?

  22. #1047
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeuhlmate View Post
    Yes, I am searching for a heavy blunt object now.

    I know beethoven is 'da shit', he invented new ways of doing things, and renewed tons of ways to compose - and I have a musician friend who tries to push Beethoven every time we listen to music.
    But this pimp just gets vaguely interested, Dunno why.
    I like some of his piano stuff, but I don't get carried away.
    Maybe because so much music since then is built on his (and Mozarts) chords, runs, melodies, structures etc.
    He is somehow overplayed even though you haven't heard the stuff ?
    Yep. The reasons why you aren't overly interested is the same reason I'm not. Our ears are now beyond what he offers (I know that sounds incredibly snobbish and elitist), but once you start diving into 30 minute movements by Mahler, Shostakovich, etc or the crazy orchestrations of Lutoslawski or Ligeti, going back to Beethoven is going to seem like a step backwards, because it is. I think Beethoven would be heavily into dissonance or advanced harmonies if he had that knowledge back then, but it just wasn't a thing. Bach went further in that area and his contrapuntal writing naturally creates advanced forms of harmonies with occasional dissonance as a cherry on top. Guys like Debussy, Satie, and Wagner paved the way for the future to my ears, and I visit that music way more often than anything in the classical or early romantic eras.
    If it isn't Krautrock, it's krap.

    "And it's only the giving
    That makes you what you are" - Ian Anderson

  23. #1048
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    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    Yep. The reasons why you aren't overly interested is the same reason I'm not. Our ears are now beyond what he offers (I know that sounds incredibly snobbish and elitist), but once you start diving into 30 minute movements by Mahler, Shostakovich, etc or the crazy orchestrations of Lutoslawski or Ligeti, going back to Beethoven is going to seem like a step backwards, because it is. I think Beethoven would be heavily into dissonance or advanced harmonies if he had that knowledge back then, but it just wasn't a thing. Bach went further in that area and his contrapuntal writing naturally creates advanced forms of harmonies with occasional dissonance as a cherry on top. Guys like Debussy, Satie, and Wagner paved the way for the future to my ears, and I visit that music way more often than anything in the classical or early romantic eras.
    The funny thing though - I have never heard anybody getting tired of Bach, no matter how predictable you with good reason could claim he is.
    yes, Stravinsky, Debussy, Ravel, Ligeti, Takemitsu, etc. are the ones I return to.

  24. #1049
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    I don't get tired of Beethoven's piano sonatas. That body of work along with the piano music of Debussy and Ravel is my favorite stuff in the world of classical music along with some of Bach's keyboard works. Up until recently I felt the need to hear a lot of dissonance in the music I listened to but my taste has changed in the past year and I'm listening to some older music I've ignored over the years. I'm just looking to discover more great pieces of the past so I don't miss out on any good stuff. I got myself a Schubert, and Chopin piano box and a Martha Argerich set. I didn't fall in love with everything but there are some great pieces I've discovered. I don't feel the need to seek out anymore modern composer's so I decided to look back and see what I missed.

  25. #1050
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    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    Some people would want to throw large heavy objects at me for saying this, but imo there are symphonies by many other cats that are more interesting than Beethoven. Don't misunderstand me - he was brilliant and a true maverick - however if you like those you would probably love some later stuff being a prog fan. 9 is pretty amazing though, as are 3 and 7. Keep listening to this stuff though, your mind will be blown.
    I'll throw the Beethoven statue on my piano at you.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

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