Thread: Classical music

  1. #826
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    Shostakovich


  2. #827
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    Debussys piano works are in my blood, my dad played them all my childhood. He especially liked the pianist Noel Lee.


    I can recommend: Debussy* • Ravel* ‎– Complete Piano Music 7 CD - from 6 € ! I have this version (among others)
    https://www.discogs.com/Debussy-Rave...elease/2607885

    I love music passionately. And because I love it, I try to free it from barren traditions that stifle it.
    Claude Debussy

  3. #828
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    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    Current klassische musik spinning:

    Wagner - Siegfried (Levine/Met 90's)
    Wagner - Choruses album
    Mahler - 5, 6 (MTT/SFS)
    Shostakovich - 4, 7, 10, 11 (symphonies - Gergiev Mariinsky )
    Shostakovich SQs - 1, 2, 3 (gonna hit them in order)
    Holy cow thatís some serious stuff there!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  4. #829
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    Messiaen

    "please do not understand me too quickly"-andre gide

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  6. #831
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    Sublime !


  7. #832
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    Had the pleasure of seeing Martha Argerich perform Prokofiev 3rd piano concerto with the phabulous Philadelphians conducted by Charles Dutoit several years ago.


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  8. #833
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    Quote Originally Posted by aith01 View Post
    Man... I need to get acquainted with Debussy. I'm sorely lacking in classical music education.
    Here's a short crash course. Claude Debussy saw and heard a Gamelan Orchestra at the 1889 Paris World's Fair. That BTW was the event for which the Eiffel Tower was erected. He was so moved by what he heard, he spent the next decade experimenting, and trying to recreate what he heard using the 12 tones of the Western Musical Scale. By the turn of the 20th Century, what emerged from that was the impressionism we all know and love today.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  9. #834
    Another Nielsen.


  10. #835
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    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    Excellent. Do you ever play Ravel?
    Ravel pieces I've listened to or looked at tend to be ferociously difficult. If I find something in intermediate or early advanced level, I would like to give Ravel a try.
    I think the subtext is rapidly becoming text.

  11. #836
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    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    Here's a short crash course. Claude Debussy saw and heard a Gamelan Orchestra at the 1889 Paris World's Fair. That BTW was the event for which the Eiffel Tower was erected. He was so moved by what he heard, he spent the next decade experimenting, and trying to recreate what he heard using the 12 tones of the Western Musical Scale. By the turn of the 20th Century, what emerged from that was the impressionism we all know and love today.
    An alternative crash course: Debussy was classically trained, and won a scholarship to study in Rome for 3-4 years. Halfway through, he quit, rejected everything his education had been based on, and began developing his own musical world. His impressionism follows on from late romanticism (particularly Liszt). Erik Satie was also an influence on Debussy.
    I think the subtext is rapidly becoming text.

  12. #837
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    Quote Originally Posted by aith01 View Post
    Man... I need to get acquainted with Debussy. I'm sorely lacking in classical music education.
    A crash course...

    Before 1600, medieval and renaissance, the foundations of classical music, typically church music or popular. Beginnings of harmony and tonality. Invention and development of music notation. Evolving from single melodic line, to multiple vocal lines in harmony, to multiple vocal lines moving independently.

    1600 to 1850, "common practice" period, denoted by use of major and minor keys (derived from earlier ecclesiastic modes). Evolution of modern instruments, sonata form, dominant forms such as full orchestra, string quartet, opera, etc. Encompasses Baroque, Classical, and early Romantic periods. Key composers tended to occur at the end of major periods, and codified the practices of the period. Examples: Bach defined counterpoint as a fundamental of Baroque, and literally wrote the book on it (The Well-Tempered Clavier, books 1 and 2). Mozart and Haydn were the summation of the Classical era. Handel was pretty much the last word on oratorios. Monteverdi defined opera.

    After 1850, departure from common practice, with use of other tonalities than major and minor, and programmatic music using narrative rather than structure. Many divergent lines of development.

    The 19th century is where music history gets very interesting in a lot of ways. Schubert and late Beethoven set the stage for evolution away from the Classical era, but it took a while for the changes to develop. Late Beethoven (last 5 quartets, last 5 piano sonatas, 9th symphony) were initially met with confusion and a perception that Beethoven was in decline. Schubert, one of the great melodists of classical music and inventor of the art song, was essentially unknown until "discovered" by Robert Schumann. While various national schools and styles had existed before, the 19th century saw the development of nationalism in music - Chopin (Polish), Liszt (Hungarian), Rimsky-Korsakov (Russian). The salons of Paris were a fertile ground for development pianists (Chopin and Liszt) as well as for piano as a performing instrument. Liszt was the first "rock star" of music, and defined many traditions still in effect today - pianists perform from memory, and sit sideways so that the audience can see their performance (they used to perform with their backs to the audience). Both composers inspired further development of the piano, particularly with the iron frames for the strings and soundboard. (Liszt broke a couple of wooden-framed pianos in concert.)

    The Romantic era split by mid-century, with Mendelssohn, Robert and Clara Schumann, and Brahms remaining in classical influence, while Liszt and his followers began the move towards modernism. It was not a friendly split. Liszt was the great early promoter of Wagner, as well as of many conductors and pianists of the era. He also conducted free master classes for any pianist to attend and participate; this influenced generations of pianists. Liszt was also an influence on other transitional composers, including Mahler and Richard Strauss.

    Liszt wrote what may be the first truly atonal piece: "La lugubre gondola". Schoenberg truly broke tonality with Pierrot Lunaire, but found composing in deliberate absence of any tonal structure to be too difficult, which drove him to develop 12-tone theory (dodecaphony, serialism, pantonality, pick your term). Minimalism developed in the US as a reaction, with Steve Reich, Terry Riley, and Philip Glass developing the style.

    At the same time that tonality was breaking down, rhythm also got its revolution, primarily in Stravinsky's Rite of Spring, which constantly changes meter. Bartok used many of the same techniques, development a percussive style with frequently changing time signatures. Satie went a different direction, often writing in "plain song" style based on medieval notation, with no time signatures or measure bars.

    Alongside all these revolutions, many composers successfully built on more traditional ground. Where Debussy's impressionism built on late Romanticism, Ravel took more of a Classical approach. Shostakovich was a great admirer of Beethoven, and frequently built on classical form. Shostakovich also wrote his own cycle of 24 preludes and fugues, in direct response to Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier. Nationalism continued in the late Romantic and early 20th century, including Grieg (Norwegian), Sibelius (Finland), Dvorak and Janacek (Czech), Villa-Lobos (Brazilian), as well as Gershwin and Copland (American).

    This is by no means a complete history or presentation of music theory, nor is it a guide to great music and composers; that is a far more extensive discussion. This is simply a minimal framework to provide some clues to understand where composers and music fit, and why.
    I think the subtext is rapidly becoming text.

  13. #838
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    Quote Originally Posted by MissKittysMom View Post
    An alternative crash course: Debussy was classically trained, and won a scholarship to study in Rome for 3-4 years. Halfway through, he quit, rejected everything his education had been based on, and began developing his own musical world. His impressionism follows on from late romanticism (particularly Liszt). Erik Satie was also an influence on Debussy.
    Fun Satie fact: He flunked out of music school, yet he's one of the most well remembered composers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Today, if one doesn't possess at least a Masters Degree, no conductor would even consider premiering one's work.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  14. #839
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    If you love Debussy and Ravel, Takemitsu might be worth som minutes.


  15. #840
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    Ivo Pogorelich !


  16. #841
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    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    Fun Satie fact: He flunked out of music school, yet he's one of the most well remembered composers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Today, if one doesn't possess at least a Masters Degree, no conductor would even consider premiering one's work.
    Flunked or got kicked out twice, as I recall. And managed piss off just about everybody. Thin-skinned, deeply insecure, eccentric, and out-spoken; he published long diatribes denouncing a number of people. They make fascinating reading!
    I think the subtext is rapidly becoming text.

  17. #842
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick L. View Post
    Another Nielsen.

    Awesome find, Rick! This is some great modern composition. The other pieces on the CD are superb as well. Ordered a copy!

  18. #843
    Quote Originally Posted by thedunno View Post
    Speaking of classical music. I just visited an ol' friend.
    That looks like Nina Shostakovich’s grave - Dmitri’s first wife and the mother of Maxim.

  19. #844
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeuhlmate View Post
    If you love Debussy and Ravel, Takemitsu might be worth som minutes.

    Yes, Takemitsu was a wonderful composer. He left us too soon.

  20. #845
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    Quote Originally Posted by jake View Post
    That looks like Nina Shostakovichís grave - Dmitriís first wife and the mother of Maxim.
    I know, dimitri is just to the right. Just saw it after my wife toom this one

  21. #846
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    Great "crash course" !!

  22. #847
    Not just another Nielsen, but another Svend Nielsen!


  23. #848
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
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    ^^ Yes, another great Dane.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  24. #849
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    Awesome technician


  25. #850
    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    ^^ Yes, another great Dane.
    Like Scooby Doo?

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