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Thread: Steve Rothery

  1. #1

    Steve Rothery

    I've got a simple question. There may not be a simple answer. What CD's does Steve Rothery shine the most. I love his style of play and am looking to expand my collection of Steve Rothery guitar playing. Thanks.
    Ken

  2. #2
    Studmuffin Scott Bails's Avatar
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    Wow.

    Not a simple question at all. I'm sure you'll get many, many different answers.

    Without giving it too much thought, my first response would either be Misplaced Childhood or Marbles.

    But then, any self-respecting Marillion fan should have these in their collection anyway.
    Music isn't about chops, or even about talent - it's about sound and the way that sound communicates to people. Mike Keneally

  3. #3
    Eesh. What a question!

    Misplaced Childhood, Clutching at Straws, Marbles, Brave, and "Easter" from Season's End.
    Progtopia is a podcast devoted to interviewing progressive rock, metal, and electronic artists from the past and present, featuring their songs and exclusive interviews. Artists interviewed on the show have included Steve Hackett, Sound of Contact, Larry Fast, Circus Maximus, Anubis Gate, Spock's Beard, and many more. http://progtopia.podomatic.com See you in a land called Progtopia!

  4. #4
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kenlearn View Post
    I love his style of play and am looking to expand my collection of Steve Rothery guitar playing.
    What do you have so far?
    www.velvetthunder.co.uk - From the ashes of the Classic Rock Society rises Velvet Thunder!

  5. #5
    Agreed with everything mentioned so far, I'd like to add the solo in This Strange Engine (the song) starting at 11:22 and ending at 12:40...

  6. #6
    I don't have anything. I have just heard some things here and there. I've read of comparisons to David Gilmour and Andrew Latimer. Really peaked my interest.

  7. #7
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
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    OK. Go with what Progtopia said!
    www.velvetthunder.co.uk - From the ashes of the Classic Rock Society rises Velvet Thunder!

  8. #8
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    His "style of play" went through very noticeable big changes starting with the Radiation album in 1998 --- his style has become more diverse since that time. So, if you mean his "classic sound" pre-Radiation, I'd suggest picking *any* Marillion album with a release date before 1998, especially Misplaced Childhood or Clutching at Straws, but personally I prefer the first two albums that came before those two (you'll find plenty of classic Rothery in the first two albums). A key part of his clean (non-distorted) sound (within his classic sound) is the Roland JC (Jazz Chorus) amp which has a very distinctive built-in "Chorus" effect -- it's also an amp with a very clean sound.

  9. #9
    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
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    I really liked Rothery's playing on Dark Side of the Moon and The Wall (particularly Comfortably Numb). At minimum, a huge influence.

  10. #10
    Geriatric Anomaly progeezer's Avatar
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    If it's only one album, either "Brave" or "Marbles".
    "My choice early in life was either to be a piano player in a whorehouse or a politician, and to tell the truth, there's hardly any difference"

    President Harry S. Truman

  11. #11
    meimjustalawnmower
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    Quote Originally Posted by mozo-pg View Post
    I really liked Rothery's playing on Dark Side of the Moon and The Wall (particularly Comfortably Numb). At minimum, a huge influence.
    Heh heh.
    I'm also fond of his contributions to all of the Camel and Genesis albums.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mozo-pg View Post
    I really liked Rothery's playing on Dark Side of the Moon and The Wall (particularly Comfortably Numb). At minimum, a huge influence.
    *snerk* I love Marillion and Rothery's playing, but apart from Fish being a Gabriel knock-off, their sound has always reminded me of 70's Pink Floyd.

    For the original question, I'd go for Misplaced Childhood for the early years and Afraid of Sunlight for the later years.

  13. #13
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    quite honestly ... don't stray too far from his latter-day contributions to MARiLLiON ... from “brave” onwards he started to gently modify his custom sound and to ease things around ... and, strangely enough, it's the albums “somewhere else” (which i otherwise hate) and “happiness is the road”, that see him at his most experimental and forward-moving without sacrificing his evocative and atmospheric playing.

    this one kills me everytime:


  14. #14
    Brave.
    "Always ready with the ray of sunshine"

  15. #15
    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
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    I'd also take Brave or Marbles.

  16. #16
    I think his most eclectic playing is on This Strange Engine and Marbles. TSE (the song) features two of his best solos ever. The album also has some diverse rhythm and textures from the acoustic Man of a Thousand Faces, the poppy One Fine Day, and the rocked up An Accidental Man.
    Wilton Said... , Toronto Art Rock.
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  17. #17
    'Seasons End', 'Holidays in Eden' (which has some of his best guitar solos in the so-called trademark style, which as others have noted is Gilmour-Latimer-Hackett influenced), 'Brave', 'This Strange Engine' and 'Marbles'.

    Much as I love 'Afraid of Sunlight', and rate it as one of Marilllion's best albums, it doesn't have that much in the way of Rothery solo highlights (although it does have some of his best rhythm playing). The same is also true of 'Anoraknophobia' and the unfairly maligned 'Radiation' - both albums I really like but not much of Rothery's signature style soloing. In fact, the most recent album 'Sounds That Can't Be Made' actually has a greater number of classic melodic Rothery moments than the previous couple of albums put together.

    If we're talking about 80s Marillion, then 'Misplaced Childhood' and 'Clutching at Straws' are the pick of the crop.

  18. #18
    To me Brave is probably the album that has the most of Rothery's playing on it. Listen to it with headphones and you will notice that he has countless overdubs with all kinds of neat little parts tucked away deep in the mix.

  19. #19
    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisXymphonia View Post
    To me Brave is probably the album that has the most of Rothery's playing on it. Listen to it with headphones and you will notice that he has countless overdubs with all kinds of neat little parts tucked away deep in the mix.
    That probably explains why Brave is my favourite Marillion album.
    What can this strange device be? When I touch it, it brings forth a sound.

  20. #20
    The Wishing Tree
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  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Wilton Said... View Post
    I think his most eclectic playing is on This Strange Engine and Marbles. TSE (the song) features two of his best solos ever. The album also has some diverse rhythm and textures from the acoustic Man of a Thousand Faces, the poppy One Fine Day, and the rocked up An Accidental Man.
    I would have to agree with the above post. However, for a good cross section of his more David Gilmour influenced playing, I'd go with the live album Thieving Magpie which was the last album with Fish. It features material from all Fish albums and has some great solos like script for a Jesters Tear, Sugar Mice, and Chelsea Monday. The live Made Again from the H era has Splintering Heart (2 great solos), Easter, and all of Brave.
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  22. #22
    Member TheH's Avatar
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    For me it will always be the early singing guitar style (the Gilmour influenced style if you want so) what I want to hear from Steve.

    On later records he proves to be a very good guitarist, but doesn't have any specific style at all.

    And original or not, I want to have my singing guitar solos back.

  23. #23
    Geriatric Anomaly progeezer's Avatar
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    Brave & Script
    "My choice early in life was either to be a piano player in a whorehouse or a politician, and to tell the truth, there's hardly any difference"

    President Harry S. Truman

  24. #24
    I'm pretty sure every 80s and 90s Marillion has been named in this thread. I'll go for Misplaced Childhood.
    flute juice

  25. #25
    I'd say go for Misplaced Childhood, Clutching At Straws, and Season's End. I actually don't remember a whole about Season's End, except that it includes the wonderful Easter, which has one of Rothery's very best solos.

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