Results 1 to 25 of 25

Thread: The 30 Most Influential Prog Drumming Albums

  1. #1
    Member ForeverAutumn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    517

    The 30 Most Influential Prog Drumming Albums

    I don't know how these were chosen, one guy or reader votes. I don't know anything about this actually other than it's an interesting list with many of the albums that I would have chosen.

    Enjoy and discuss.

    http://www.musicradar.com/news/drums...-albums-607356

    P.S. Sorry, I'm at work and I don't have time to list them all in the thread so that you don't have to click the link.

  2. #2
    Surprised at the inclusion of Systematic Chaos, personally I wouldn't be able to look past SFAM if I was choosing an influential DT/Portnoy drumming album.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    Surprised at the inclusion of Systematic Chaos, personally I wouldn't be able to look past SFAM if I was choosing an influential DT/Portnoy drumming album.
    Personally, it is my favorite DT album after SFAM.
    That being said, I'm not sure how an album can be all that influential if it was only released in the past 3-4 years.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Paris, France
    Posts
    458
    I love Pink Floyd and Arena, but I don't think Mason and Pointer belong in this list.
    Not just a Genesis fanboy.

  5. #5
    I would go a step back past Mason to Ringo. I would say that Michael Giles was influential... need to go actually look at the list.

  6. #6
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  7. #7
    Member Digital_Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Philly burbs PA
    Posts
    775
    I agree with a lot of the drummers but not necessarily the videos. "Dust in the wind?" ????

  8. #8
    I stopped at 28. Since when is Steve Vai prog.
    NEVER UNDERESTIMATE THE POWER OF STUPID PEOPLE IN LARGE GROUPS!

  9. #9
    Glad to see Andy Ward and Guy Evans getting some respect. Missing are Pip Pyle (either Hatfield or any National Health) and Chester Thompson (Zappa's One Size Fits All).

  10. #10
    Member mnprogger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    627
    odd list to say the least.

  11. #11
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    The Kingdom of YHVH
    Posts
    2,206
    Tony Williams - Emergency!

  12. #12
    Pip Pyle was not missing, he played on #30 (Angel’s Egg by Gong). But having him and Andy Ward on the list but not Robert Wyatt seems wrong. And there’s way too much metal and neo-prog on this list. How “influential” can albums from five years ago be, really?
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

  13. #13
    Proud Member since 2/2002 UnderAGlassMoon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    86
    Quote Originally Posted by Progbear View Post
    Pip Pyle was not missing, he played on #30 (Angel’s Egg by Gong). But having him and Andy Ward on the list but not Robert Wyatt seems wrong. And there’s way too much metal and neo-prog on this list. How “influential” can albums from five years ago be, really?
    I agree, strange list. I could see including Portnoy, but he's the only one from the metal side of things that needed to be included.
    Eric: "What the hell Hutch, it's all Rush, what if we wanted a little variety?"

    Hutch: "Rush is variety, Bitch! Rule number one: in my van, its Rush! All Rush, all the time...no exceptions."

    From "Fanboys" 2009.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Progbear View Post
    How “influential” can albums from five years ago be, really?
    So, in 1972, no one could have known that "Sgt. Pepper" was influential???

  15. #15
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    The Kingdom of YHVH
    Posts
    2,206
    should something be a new or different twist in order to be influential?
    I mean, if it sounds the same as something that came before, then it would be influenced, not influential no?

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by UnderAGlassMoon View Post
    I agree, strange list. I could see including Portnoy, but he's the only one from the metal side of things that needed to be included.
    Brann Dailor from Mastodon is a monster so I was glad he was on there.

  17. #17
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    The Kingdom of YHVH
    Posts
    2,206
    Mahavishnu Orchestra - The Inner Mounting Flame

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by LeFrog View Post
    I love Pink Floyd and Arena, but I don't think Mason and Pointer belong in this list.
    ^^^at least Phil Collins is in good company!

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Progbear View Post
    Pip Pyle was not missing, he played on #30 (Angel’s Egg by Gong).
    No it doesn't. That was Pierre Moerlen. Pip played on "Camembert Electrique" and "Continental Circus", both from 1971.
    Calyx (Canterbury Scene) - http://www.calyx-canterbury.fr
    Legends In Their Own Lunchtime (blog) - https://canterburyscene.wordpress.com/
    My latest books : "Yes" (2017) - https://lemotetlereste.com/musiques/yes/ + "L'Ecole de Canterbury" (2016) - http://lemotetlereste.com/musiques/lecoledecanterbury/
    Upcoming prog (& beyond) shows in France - http://www.bigbangmag.com/agenda.php
    Excerpts from interviews : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...z9EvJjeuxQJ4x5

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Paris, France
    Posts
    458
    Quote Originally Posted by Rufus View Post
    ^^^at least Phil Collins is in good company!
    I'm sure it's obvious to everyone that Collins is in a completely different league than Mason and Pointer .
    But Phil Collins ruined the 30 most influential prog drumming albums, so what do I know?
    Not just a Genesis fanboy.

  21. #21
    And of course nothing with Christian Vander and Magma....
    I'm not lazy. I just work so fast I'm always done.

  22. #22
    Larks' Tongues in Aspic

    The work of Jamie Muir and Bill Bruford was and is as innovative as I've ever heard. But maybe it's not Prog Rock, perhaps just Avant Garde music.

    Not just the percussion and drums either, artistically it's an amazing work.

  23. #23
    Lots of good choices, but seriously, Mick Pointer??? Admittedly I've never listened to that Arena album, but I find it hard to believe his performance on any album is comparable to the other guys on this list.

    I'll take Nick Mason, may not be an amazing drummer but every aspect of those Floyd albums is hugely influential, so that will include his drumming as well.

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by ForeverAutumn View Post
    I don't know how these were chosen, one guy or reader votes. I don't know anything about this actually other than it's an interesting list with many of the albums that I would have chosen.
    It says at the end that it was a readers' poll. Which would explain why it's so haphazard and strange. And how the heck are albums from 2013 and 2012 among the most influential of all time? Ah - fans.

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Beetlebum View Post
    Larks' Tongues in Aspic

    The work of Jamie Muir and Bill Bruford was and is as innovative as I've ever heard. But maybe it's not Prog Rock, perhaps just Avant Garde music.
    Initially, 'progressive rock' pointed to exactly that - an avant-garde element in pop/rock Music. So yes, Larks Tongues in 1973 was absolutely definitely "prog rock", while I'm certainly not sure of the majority of clichèd upstart irrelevance featured in these types of ignorant and uninformed articles.

    Little in rock has ever been as profoundly creative and groundbreaking as that found in the Music of Beefheart, Zappa, Magma, Soft Machine, KC, Gentle Giant, Henry Cow, This Heat et al - but you won't find it mentioned in places like the one in question here.
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •