Page 3 of 14 FirstFirst 1234567891011121314 LastLast
Results 51 to 75 of 334

Thread: Why is The Lamb rated so highly?

  1. #51
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    173
    My first impression of The Lamb from the early 90s still holds true: brilliant & exciting at times, but clearly rushed. Even as a highschool kid, The Lamb seemed to deliver less than half of what it promised; it just didn't draw me in for repeated listens like some other Genesis albums.

    Side 1 is the only stretch that really works, IMO. There are some great moments on the other 3 sides, but it pales in comparison to the impact I received (and still receive) from Selling England or Duke, for example.

    I can list the various reasons why I feel that's true, but at the end of the day it falls on each listener. I get the same gut reaction to say, "Anyway" or "In The Rapids," as I do to the band's "lighter fare" like "Man on the Corner" or "Silent Sun." Too much exposition lyrically & too much repetition musically to compare favorably with their greatest work.

    Seeing The Musical Box perform The Lamb in NYC several years ago had an unexpected effect on me: I got bored by the time "The Lamia" arrived, just as when I listen to the album!

    Should've been a single LP, should've been set anywhere but NYC, and yes, I still love parts of it!

  2. #52
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    9,234
    The one track with the widdly ambient stuff (always forget if that's silent sorrow or not) is the only one I ever feel like skipping. And "It" I just think isn't a very good song, but I don't skip it if I've made it that far. Everything else is excellent.
    I think it's a great album, fits in well for where the band was at the time. ATTOTT might seem like a step back as far as being more pastoral again, but that was good thing of course.

    As far as the story of Lamb, I think it does an ok job of telling it - it's just not a very compelling story, but I don't really mind.

    Ok, never had any problem with Gabriel's voice on Lamb either.

  3. #53
    Member BobM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    342
    Agree that it is my top Genesis album pick, and very highly on my list of top prog album picks (maybe because I know every word of it). OK, so the story doesn't flow so well on the album, in fact I really can only vaguely guess at what is going on from the songs.

    The music and thematic scoring is wonderful, however. I love how it all hangs together musically while still keeping things fresh throughout. OK, so there are some throwaways where they are just making noise. frankly, I can;t understand what that filler was supposed to represent, except maybe Peter wanted time for a costume change in a live setting.

    Lyrically is where this album shines for me. Pete wrote some beautiful imagery into many of these songs. Just read Lamia and you will see what I mean.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A gentleman is defined as someone who knows how to play the accordion, and doesn't.

  4. #54
    Member Yanks2014's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    0
    I will NEVER understand criticism of this album, it's another one of their brilliant efforts from the 70's. And with two albums worth, a lot of classic Genesis. Does the story flow, does the concept work? Don't know, don't care, I always listen to this as a collection of individual songs anyway. Some of my favorites of their are on this, and I really can't think of any poor tracks. Is this as good as the prior album? No, not in my opinion. But Selling England was perfect to my ears. This is just below perfect, lots of incredible songs. I wouldn't change a thing about it.

  5. #55
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    361
    Quote Originally Posted by zombywoof View Post
    I wonder, though, as an experiment, has anyone tried listening to Disc 2 alone? Perhaps we are all just exhausted by the time it rolls around to "Lillywhite Lilith"?
    I've done it. The music on the second disc is just really weak. I always thought much of Wind and Wuthering was an attempt to reproduce the sound they were going for on the second disc of The Lamb but to do it right, so to speak. It also doesn't help that the story loses any semblance of a narrative thread around then too. First disc still rules though!

  6. #56
    To me it's strictly killer - no filler. I find this album to be the essence of great "progressive" rock of the 70's. The story and music can be a bit wild and overwhelming (for some), but to me that's a good thing. I think it's Genesis' best record if I had to pick one, better sounding than the previous albums (which I love as well), and in it's own sonic world. I don't see whats so difficult about the story. Its outrageous, but it's supposed to be... the music portrays it all in a beautiful way, very melodic, with great singing, and some of Genesis' best instrumental work. And they even did some improv & ambient music as part of the program... I just think it's about as good as "prog" gets....! Not a weak moment to me!

  7. #57
    I'd put this in the same category as Physical Graffiti: overlong and self-indulgent, but hey, at least it's listenable for most of its length unlike SOME double albums I could name. There's stuff that's A-plus Genesis material but it starts to lose steam on Disc 2. The three albums they did before this were all superior. But for a double album it's not bad. Best they ever did? Don't be silly! Those who think this is their high point are of the "bigger is better" school of prog thought; the sort that think TFTO is the best Yes album, the sort that consider Transatlantic to be the best modern prog band because they write nothing but half-hour epics. I prefer my Genesis in smaller doses; the Lamb has its moments but, like most double albums, strikes me as excessive and gratuitous.
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

  8. #58
    Member Brian Griffin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Rhode Island
    Posts
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Progbear View Post
    Those who think this is their high point are the sort that think TFTO is the best Yes album.
    Exactly, because it is, in both cases

    Their most grand, most ambitious efforts - the height of the "movement" as I see it

    Quote Originally Posted by Progbear View Post
    the sort that consider Transatlantic to be the best modern prog band because they write nothing but half-hour epics
    I'm of a different sort. no interest

    BG
    "When Yes appeared on stage, it was like, the gods appearing from the heavens, deigning to play in front of the people."

  9. #59
    Member No Pride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Chicago, IL, USA
    Posts
    122
    Quote Originally Posted by Progbear View Post
    Those who think this is their high point are of the "bigger is better" school of prog thought; the sort that think TFTO is the best Yes album, the sort that consider Transatlantic to be the best modern prog band because they write nothing but half-hour epics.
    Isn't that a bit of a sweeping generalization? Can't people consider it their best because they think it contains their strongest material?

    I don't know if it's their best; I'm back and forth on which album is. I think there's some great stuff on NC and Foxtrot, but for me, they hit their stride on SEBtP and practically everything they did from that album through W&W was golden. I only wish the production and recording on The Lamb was half as good as the two albums that bookended it.

  10. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    it's just not a very compelling story
    A schizophrenic street punk attempts to save his perceived Brother as he wrestles with freakish creatures and a surreal, underground NYC. This amidst his own trust issues, sexual development and discoveries?

    Surely you jest. That story could be pitched as a groundbreaking film tomorrow and have interest. And here it is 40 years later.

  11. #61
    My big question is why does it matter to you what others think of any given album? Or do you just have a need to knock this one? It's like a thread on "why do people like mixed vegetables? I HATE lima beans."
    Sleeping at home is killing the hotel business!

  12. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by wilcox660 View Post
    My big question is why does it matter to you what others think of any given album?
    If that motivation has to be justified on a board devoted to the discussion of music, then this place may as well be shut down.

    He thinks it sucks. I don't think so personally, but I'm certainly willing to listen to arguments to the contrary.

  13. #63
    Studmuffin Scott Bails's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Near Philly, PA
    Posts
    4,118
    Quote Originally Posted by wilcox660 View Post
    It's like a thread on "why do people like mixed vegetables? I HATE lima beans."
    This is a great idea. I never understood that, either. Lima beans are nasty.
    Music isn't about chops, or even about talent - it's about sound and the way that sound communicates to people. Mike Keneally

  14. #64
    It is a great work of art. The story doesn't seem weak to me, though it isn't always clear. Not sure if I expect my prog lyrics to be spelled out for me. Otherwise, I would have nothing but contempt for Yes; I just go for the ride and don't mind a little mind puzzle, even if there is no clear answer.

    Is it their best album? No, it is ONE of their best albums imo. They had many peaks, and this album qualifies as one to me.

  15. #65
    I appreciate the ambition that went into the [doubple] album, but for me, it just doesn't "do it". I feel like it's just one slab of music after another without any real connection between them, other than The Story. I get what they were trying to do, I just don't feel like they did it very well. It's got some good moments here and there (mostly when Gabriel's not up front doing The Story), but it's very spotty throughout. I do like Collins's drumming quite a bit. And I like some of the live renditions that I've heard. I bet I'd probably enjoy seeing this done live (either by TMB or by the band themselves if I were to time-travel back to 1974-75).

    But yeah, I know lots of folks (here and elsewhere) love it. And that's cool. I just wish I could say the same. It's the kinda thing I would love to love .. but for whatever reason I just don't.
    flute juice

  16. #66
    Even I have to grumblingly admit the album just totally runs out of steam on Side 4, but you know what? Fuggit It's just such a cool, dark, twisted and relatively heavy album I don't care. It's my favorite overall of the Gabriel era. And yes, I don't know what he's singing about and I don't care. Lyrics are just noise to hang a melody on I love The Lamb and I love Tales. I'm just that kind of guy

  17. #67
    So many strong musical points... Its like a lesson in what makes Genesis tick.

    as far as the story goes, this is what we thought it was about( circa 1976): The second between life and death- Rael gets hit by a cab...the entire album takes place from that second until he hits the ground and dies... it aludes to the time frame in the last line of the story, the rest came from lots of listening and "fueled" discussion

  18. #68
    Member Paulrus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    The Left Coast
    Posts
    1,145
    Quote Originally Posted by arise_shine View Post
    I bet I'd probably enjoy seeing this done live (either by TMB or by the band themselves if I were to time-travel back to 1974-75).
    I finally got to see The Musical Box do this last year and you know what? It was much smaller than I thought it would be. The album has a bigger range and depth than a live band can deliver on stage. And even with the back projections the story line was confusing. It didn't help that Denis Gagné (Gabriel) spent a lot of time toward the rear of the stage, where microphone stands were set up on risers. I was expecting a lot more front of stage, extroverted jumping around. And the rest of the band might as well have been statuary. No wonder Gabriel felt compelled to liven things up on stage, but for the Lamb I think the concept was beyond even his reach.

    Quote Originally Posted by kayfabe58 View Post
    as far as the story goes, this is what we thought it was about( circa 1976): The second between life and death- Rael gets hit by a cab...the entire album takes place from that second until he hits the ground and dies... it aludes to the time frame in the last line of the story, the rest came from lots of listening and "fueled" discussion
    That's actually an argument that's been made. If you dig around the 'net long enough you'll track down a very exhaustive (some might say anal ) treatise that was put together by someone some years ago that espouses that very theory.
    I'm holding out for the Wilson-mixed 5.1 super-duper walletbuster special anniversary extra adjectives edition.

  19. #69
    One thing I thought of recently. The Lamb doesn't have those twinkling arpeggiated guitar parts that was so much a part of their sound up until then (stagnation, suppers, cinema show, musical box, etc). They return to that on the next album with Entangled, but for Lamb they took a pause from it. Fans at the time must have been struck by the stark difference of the Lamb.

  20. #70
    Member Brian Griffin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Rhode Island
    Posts
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by No Pride View Post
    Isn't that a bit of a sweeping generalization?
    IMO, yes

    Quote Originally Posted by No Pride View Post
    I think there's some great stuff on NC and Foxtrot, but for me, they hit their stride on SEBtP
    Truth be told, I do think you can make a case for CttE in Yes's case as well but for me it is the totality of the ambition on Tales and the Lamb that puts them in a place like none other for me

    The elaborate concept, the beautiful album jackets, the ambitious stage presentations on the respective tours, and yes, that they had the balls to go all in with a double LP all contribute, but I wouldn't change a note on either album

    Intersting comments in regard to strongest weakest sides - I love sides 3/4, some of Banks best runs ever

    BG
    "When Yes appeared on stage, it was like, the gods appearing from the heavens, deigning to play in front of the people."

  21. #71
    Member WytchCrypt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    0
    While not my fave Genesis album - that would be Nursery Cryme - I think the Lamb is a masterpiece. The only bad thing I can say about it is that side 4 bogs down a bit in "The Light Dies Down on Broadway" which seems uninspired and like a bit of a filler song to me trying to tie the end of the album lyrically to the beginning. Other than that, some of my fave Genesis moments are here (Supernatural Anesthetist, The Lamia, Slippermen, Grand Parade, In the Cage, Fly on a Windshield, Broadway Melody, Carpet Crawlers, etc...).
    I'm using the chicken to measure it...

  22. #72
    Progdog ThomasKDye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Vallejo, CA
    Posts
    583
    Quote Originally Posted by trurl View Post
    Even I have to grumblingly admit the album just totally runs out of steam on Side 4
    Quote Originally Posted by WytchCrypt View Post
    The only bad thing I can say about it is that side 4 bogs down a bit in "The Light Dies Down on Broadway" which seems uninspired and like a bit of a filler
    Honest, this is something I don't get at all. "The Light" through "It" is such a sweet moment of lyrical redemption (go back to reality or perform a final selfless act). Musically it's so nice with Banks' quirky solo on "Scree" fading into the appropriately reflective "Rapids", which gradually builds into the triumphant fanfare of Hackett-style guitar notes that is "It." If I had a complaint it's that "It" fades out, but even that sort of works. (Live, though, they just "stopped" the song with the most anticlimactic ending to an epic ever. It would have been interesting if they'd done what they'd done later and crossfaded into "Watcher.")

    To me, it doesn't run out of steam, it has exactly the appropriate amount of world-weariness that such a taxing Pilgrim's Progress would bring. I think, believe it or not, it's THAT bit that sold me on the rest of the story being worthwhile.
    "Arf." -- Frank Zappa, "Beauty Knows No Pain" (live version)

  23. #73
    Member since March 2004 mozo-pg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    8,889
    I bought the album a few years after its release and I instantly fell in love with the Lamb. I would say sides one and two are more commercial/straightforward while three and four are more demanding from the listener but reaps the greatest rewards. I love the ambient dissonance of The Waiting Room. The Lamb has always been my favourite progressive rock album.

  24. #74
    I do think that Side 4 has moments. Riding the Scree is pretty good. The instrumental bits of Raven are good but the song itself is pretty lame imo. But for me It is just the most anti-climactic climax to any prog epic I can think of. Los Endos it aint It reeks of "god, get this over with"...

  25. #75
    Does anybody else think that the "It" synth glissando into the chord strummed guitar sounds like the old Greyhound or Trailways Bus Commercials?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •