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Thread: The Rolling Stones

  1. #51
    Progga mogrooves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    The best keyboardists The Stones ever had were Ian Stewart and Ian McLagen.
    Nicky Hopkins
    Michael: "Harold, don't you have any other music, you know, from [last] century?"
    Harold: "There is no other music....."

  2. #52
    What tours did Hopkins play on? He was great and played with everybody.

    Bill
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  3. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    ^Can't blame her. Their sets are as safe as can be these days, especially after the halfway mark. The playing wasn't great but the 2012 shows had many curveballs, which I appreciated. 'Lady Jane' and 'I Wanna Be Your Man'!
    I think the Stones have the same problem Yes has except to a larger degree. There are songs they must play (Brown Sugar, Satisfaction, Miss You, Start Me Up, Jumping Jack Flash, Sympathy for the Devil). Then there are a number of other songs that are usually in and out of the sets with regularity: It's Only Rock N Roll, Let It Bleed, Monkey Man, Under My Thumb, You Got Me Rocking, Out of Control, among others). Then if there is something new out they want to play that Doom and Gloom and One More Shot during 2012 and I'm assuming that some of the B & L material will get worked in. Usually they will throw a song or two that hasn't been played in forever into the list. They played Dance Little Sister not to long ago and dug up Mixed Emotions recently. In the 90's they worked in Not Fade Away for a tour. Lately, they've stuck more to the better known songs which I understand, but I like it when they mix it up more as well. Of course it you are forking over $800 bucks for a seat you get what you want and that means Satisfaction comes with hearing Brown Sugar, again and not some obscure track from Out of Our Heads or Bridges to Bablyon.

    Bill
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  4. #54
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    He only toured with the band during three tours according to Wiki: '71 England, '72 America, '73 Pacific. But oh, what a list of songs he played on:

    "In Another Land" (1967), She's a Rainbow" (1967) on the Their Satanic Majesties Request album, "We Love You" (1967), "Sympathy for the Devil" (1968), "Street Fighting Man" (1968), "Gimme Shelter" (1969), "Monkey Man" (1969), "Sway" (1971), "Tumbling Dice" and many others on Exile on Main St. (1972), "Angie" (1973), "Time Waits for No One" (1974), "Fool to Cry" (1976), "Waiting on a Friend" (recorded 1972, released 1981)
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  5. #55
    Jazzbo manquť Mister Triscuits's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adm.Kirk View Post
    Usually they will throw a song or two that hasn't been played in forever into the list.
    I liked the idea they had on the Bridges to Babylon tour where fans got to vote on what deep track they would pull out each night. At the show I saw, we got "Star Star" in that slot...although "Little Queenie" in the small stage segment seemed to me an even nicer surprise.

  6. #56
    I would love to see more from that era too. I think many Stones fans would. It was nice to see them pull out Connection. I'm curious what the sets will be like on the upcoming UK tour. They really could stand to freshen it up.

    Bill
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  7. #57
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    Speaking of deep tracks, I absolutely love the speed-corrected version of "Fingerprint File". The original was sped up to fit on the end of the LP. This version came out on a Japanese SACD release almost a decade ago and it works soooo much better at this speed. Nastier, funkier, and the paranoia is somehow deeper. I think they only played this song on the '75 tour.

    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  8. #58
    That song always worked better live than in the studio. It's on of those songs they should pull back out along with Time Waits for No One. Speaking of Steel Wheels, Almost Hear You Sight and Terrifying should get dusted off again. So many great songs they never play. Even more recent material like Saint of Me or Biggest Mistake would be welcome.

    Bill
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  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo View Post
    I would respectfully disagree. Nicky Hopkins was the best of the lot. So many of those quintessential Stones classics feature his piano.
    Always loved what Nicky did on the Jamming with Edward album - he really shines here:

  10. #60
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    Listening to the live version of "Fingerprint" from LA Friday and damn, Wyman brings da funk in the last section.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  11. #61
    A bassist who never, ever gets the credit he deserves. Listen to him on the Hampton show from '81. He's amazing. If you can find the boot of that show he's way up front in the mix and you can really hear what he's doing.

    Bill
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  12. #62
    Progga mogrooves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    I think Wood played bass on it ...
    I think Wood is a better bassist than guitarist.
    Michael: "Harold, don't you have any other music, you know, from [last] century?"
    Harold: "There is no other music....."

  13. #63
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    Wood can be a very fine guitarist indeed- he's all over The Faces' records (tearing up the slide on 'That's All You Need', chopping out the riffs on 'Stay With Me', that haunting little solo version of 'Jerusalem'). But his lead work in The 'Stones has never stood out, to me, compared with Mick Taylor. I'm not sure why.

    Richards talks about him and Wood's similarity in style as 'weaving'- it could be argued less charitably that he didn't want another player shining too much, as Taylor did (and it's been said, including by Richards himself, that him and Taylor never really hit it off). It's more like there are two rhythm players with Wood in the band. They still sounded great but Taylor gave them something else live, something that Jagger once admitted they didn't have before or since.

    It's the same with Kenney Jones in The Who- you'll find better work in previous bands.
    Last edited by JJ88; 02-27-2018 at 12:33 PM.

  14. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post

    Richards talks about him and Wood's similarity in style as 'weaving'- it could be argued less charitably that he didn't want another player shining too much, as Taylor did (and it's been said, including by Richards himself, that him and Taylor never really hit it off). It's more like there are two rhythm players with Wood in the band. They still sounded great but Taylor gave them something else live, something that Jagger once admitted they didn't have before or since..
    Judging from what is in the Ladies And Gentlemen, The Rolling Stones film, I'd say Taylor was the wrong guitarist for that band. It's been awhile since I've watched it, but my memory was that there were quite a few songs where he's just wailing away, and I'm thinking "Does he know which band he's playing in?!".

    I remember Keith saying that there was more of a division between "rhythm" and "lead" guitar when Taylor was in the band, with Taylor not really copping the rhythmic vibe that Keith had. He said with Woody, if one of them dropped his pick or broke a string or whatever, the other could take over the respective part until he'd recovered, which apparently didn't really happen with Taylor.

  15. #65
    Exactly. Richards and Jones did that in the early days with the weaving. Listen to the On Air album that came out in December. Those BBC recordings give you an idea of how Jones and Richards "weaved" and Wood is able to do this as well. Taylor's a great musician and excellent guitar player. He did some great work with the Stones. Jones and Wood were/are about to play a variety of instruments. Wood has even played sax and drums on some tracks with the Stones. Taylor was the lead guitar player with an occasional foray over to bass. He was great at what he did and he had less personality on stage than Bill Wyman. I feel that Wood, strictly as an all around musician, is a better fit than Taylor.

    Bill
    She'll be standing on the bar soon
    With a fish head and a harpoon
    and a fake beard plastered on her brow.

  16. #66
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    I'm listening to the Live in Leeds '82 which is a pretty example of that weaving - the leads are jumping and weaving out of both speakers. Neither Woody or Keith are Taylor's equal but they mesh quite well. Another charm of this performance is that no one is higher than a kite and everyone seems locked in and kicking ass. Once they hit the 90s you got the Rolling Stones Revue productions and things were a little slicker.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  17. #67
    Progga mogrooves's Avatar
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    Caught the Fonda theatre performance on PBS the other night. Wood sounded good; it's Keef who's lost a step (or two).
    Michael: "Harold, don't you have any other music, you know, from [last] century?"
    Harold: "There is no other music....."

  18. #68
    I haven't cared about the Stones since Mick Taylor left.
    "And your little sister's immaculate virginity wings away on the bony shoulders of a young horse named George who stole surreptitiously into her geography revision."

    Occasional musical musings on https://darkelffile.blogspot.com/

  19. #69
    Between Wood sobering up and Keith having his issues after the head injury, Ronnie is doing more. I just with they would let him write a song or two.

    Bill
    She'll be standing on the bar soon
    With a fish head and a harpoon
    and a fake beard plastered on her brow.

  20. #70
    Or Justin Timberlake or Taylor Swift. I'm sure Keith loves it...not.

    Bill
    She'll be standing on the bar soon
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  21. #71
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    I can see Keith loving to play with folks like Buddy Guy but pop stars, probably not.

    I played Seconds Out this morning as my required prog. I've got Ladies and Gentlemen, The Rolling Stones playing on my PC so I can just listen to the audio while working. Damn, they were LETHAL back then. No big production, just the usual backups on a normal stage. And there was no dross on the set list back then.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  22. #72
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  23. #73
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    Rumours that Paris 1976 will be an upcoming 'from the vault' release. I've seen what was broadcast on TV- shown on the Old Grey Whistle Test in the UK, and I think French TV showed more songs- and my feeling was that it was tighter than the LA Forum stuff the previous year.

    I'm not sure how much more footage of them with Mick Taylor there is. I'm surprised that they have never released a complete promos collection on DVD/BluRay.

  24. #74
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    Mick Taylor was certainly the best guitarist the Stones ever had, but boy, did he have a wooden stage presence. I guess itís been said that he suffered from stage fright! To be fair, Bill Wyman and Charlie Watts didnít add much to the visual side of things, either!

  25. #75
    Taylor was, by all means, the best guitarist they had but I don't think he fits the band as well as Ron Wood. Wood just seems to work better with Keith.

    Bill
    She'll be standing on the bar soon
    With a fish head and a harpoon
    and a fake beard plastered on her brow.

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