Thread: What are you currently reading?

  1. #1851
    Member nosebone's Avatar
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    Distortions - Ann Beattie
    no tunes, no dynamics, no nosebone

  2. #1852
    Pikachupacabra spellbound's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo View Post
    Has anyone read the two Clockwork books that Kevin Anderson and Neil Peart wrote? Any good?
    I read one of them. I was unaware there was a second one. The one I read was decent.

  3. #1853
    Member Lou's Avatar
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    You Suck - Christopher Moore. Moore takes on the vampire genre.
    A Comfort Zone is not a Life Sentence

  4. #1854
    Just started Catherynne M. Valente's Space Opera. It (so far) reads very much in the zone between Douglas Adams (Hitchhikers Guide) and Sir Terry Pratchett (the Discworld books). Glad to know someone's still mining that ore.
    Ring the bells, that still can ring,
    Forget your perfect offering.
    There is a crack - a crack in everything.
    That's how the light gets in.

  5. #1855
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    Just started Catherynne M. Valente's Space Opera. It (so far) reads very much in the zone between Douglas Adams (Hitchhikers Guide) and Sir Terry Pratchett (the Discworld books). Glad to know someone's still mining that ore.
    Well that needs further investigation
    Ian

    I blame Wynton, what was the question?
    There are only 10 types of people in the World, those who understand binary and those that don't.

  6. #1856
    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad View Post
    Well that needs further investigation
    Yeah, I'd like to concur based on even that little bit of info. Funnily enough, I tried to loan a Discworld book to a friend last night. He was going to take it but he's a drunken Irishman so he forgot.
    Carry On My Blood-Ejaculating Son - JKL2000

  7. #1857
    Death Spore by Harry Adam Knight

  8. #1858
    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    Just started Catherynne M. Valente's Space Opera. It (so far) reads very much in the zone between Douglas Adams (Hitchhikers Guide) and Sir Terry Pratchett (the Discworld books). Glad to know someone's still mining that ore.
    I'd swear the premise of this book was played out on the new tv show Miracle Workers. I'll have to go back and look but I'm sure I just saw this recently.
    Carry On My Blood-Ejaculating Son - JKL2000

  9. #1859
    Quote Originally Posted by markwoll View Post
    State of The Art by Iain Banks
    A warm up for Anathem by Neal Stevenson
    I haven't read State of the Art (yet), but Anathem might just be my favorite novel by anyone ever. It just clicked with me for some reason.

  10. #1860
    Quote Originally Posted by aith01 View Post
    I haven't read State of the Art (yet), but Anathem might just be my favorite novel by anyone ever. It just clicked with me for some reason.
    No doubt. Incredible Neal Stevenson!

  11. #1861
    Quote Originally Posted by TheLoony View Post
    I'd swear the premise of this book was played out on the new tv show Miracle Workers. I'll have to go back and look but I'm sure I just saw this recently.
    Other than the "save Earth from destruction" concept, no. This is about a down and out funkpopglam star being abducted, along with the one remaining member of his original band, to represent earth in a sort of intergalactic Eurovision Song Contest. It's like Terry Pratchett in that there is serious stuff hiding amongst the humor, but the humor itself is more like Douglas Adams.
    Ring the bells, that still can ring,
    Forget your perfect offering.
    There is a crack - a crack in everything.
    That's how the light gets in.

  12. #1862
    Under the Fang (Horror Anthology) edited by Robert McCammon

  13. #1863
    facetious maximus Yves's Avatar
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    About halfway through " Prince Of Thorns", book 1 of Mark Lawrence's "Broken Empire" trilogy. Loving it so far! Gritty fantasy without the bloated world building that tends to slow the genre down. Razor sharp prose so far...
    "Corn Flakes pissed in. You ranted. Mission accomplished. Thread closed."

    -Cozy 3:16-

  14. #1864
    Well, Space Opera was a hoot beginning to end.

    Now reading: Circe, by Madeline Miller.
    Ring the bells, that still can ring,
    Forget your perfect offering.
    There is a crack - a crack in everything.
    That's how the light gets in.

  15. #1865
    Jaws 2 by Hank Searls

  16. #1866
    Quote Originally Posted by interbellum View Post

    This week I started two books (one at home, one in the train): Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tail and Rich Wilson's Time Flies: The Story Of Porcupine Tree.
    First you think: those have nothing in common, but then you read that one of the inspirations for the bandname MAY come from a poem from Atwood with the same title!
    The book I read after The Handmaid's Tail (which in fact tells the story roughly shown in series 1) I started reading the second book by a Dutch thriller-writer, Ronald Van Der Pol, who's leading figure is a progrock-lover. And guess what, the first band he mentioned was Porcupine Tree! Speaking of Full Circle.

  17. #1867
    What Do You Call That Noise? (An XTC discovery book)

  18. #1868
    Sweetheart, Sweetheart by Bernard Taylor

  19. #1869
    Member Lopez's Avatar
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    Bring It on Home by Mark Blake. A biography of manager Peter Grant. Mighty interesting.
    Lou

    Awarded the Krusty Brand Seal of Approval. It's not just good, it's good enough.

  20. #1870
    Finished Circe. Very good, a real work of literary art.

    Now on Tolkien's Tale of Kullervo. (About halfway through; it's a very short book.)
    Ring the bells, that still can ring,
    Forget your perfect offering.
    There is a crack - a crack in everything.
    That's how the light gets in.

  21. #1871
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    How quickly do you read?
    Ian

    I blame Wynton, what was the question?
    There are only 10 types of people in the World, those who understand binary and those that don't.

  22. #1872
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    So if the average novel is 90,000 words it takes about four and a half hours to read. I wonder why it takes me 6 months to finish a book?
    Ian

    I blame Wynton, what was the question?
    There are only 10 types of people in the World, those who understand binary and those that don't.

  23. #1873
    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad View Post
    How quickly do you read?
    I don't know the words per minute, but I finish 75-100 books per year, depending on length, style, etc. of what I read in a given year. But I don't watch teevee, so that gives me a lot of reading time.
    Ring the bells, that still can ring,
    Forget your perfect offering.
    There is a crack - a crack in everything.
    That's how the light gets in.

  24. #1874
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    I'm about to start Jonathan Coe's Middle England, which can be see as Rotter's Club part 3 (Broken Circle being part 2)


    It had been a fair while since the under-average Number 11, which was written by Edgar Allan Coe

    OK, I should finish tonight though this highly enjoyable Rotter's Club Pt 3.... I had to drop the book for four weeks because of more urgent reading matters, but I've been devouring the second half (with a vengeance) in the last couple of days.
    Found quasi all of the protagonists of the first two books happily without having to go back and find out what they did before or who they were.
    A delightful description of the London 2012 games opening ceremony and the reactions are delicious.
    Then comes the absurdities of the Brexit and the damage it can have caused inside couples, etc...



    As for Benjie's life oeuvre... I won't spoil it, but ....

    As far as music is concerned, we've got more references about it than in Broken Circle (Ch 2), and there is a delectable moment where Trotter is being interviewed by a young blond female journalist as part of his book release and promotion and he speaks totally clumsily of Hatfield & The North and of prog rock in general to explain the complexity and yet accessibility of his writings... However the journo understands zilch of the concept and context and will totally misquote him, just retaining spicy but deformed scoops.





    Sure, the hardback book did set me back of 26, but it was a quite enjoyable read
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from heroin-addicts to crazy ones

  25. #1875
    The Girl in a Swing by Richard Adams

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