Thread: What are you currently reading?

  1. #1801
    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    Sheldrake is a mystical clown...
    Yes, His mysticism is speculative, but no more so than some of the problems he points out, such as the variance of the speed of light. Once understood better, the reason for it will deepen scientific understanding, rather than just standardizing it and calling everything else outliers. He is also a really smart guy. many have dismissed his speculative conclusions, but I appreciate his observations on how science is becoming dogmatic. Popper is being swept under the rug as funding becomes more and more of a challenge. Science is not cheap any more.
    I got nothin'

    ...avoiding any implication that I have ever entertained a cognizant thought.

  2. #1802
    Member Lopez's Avatar
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    Sleazoid Express by Bill Landis and Michelle Clifford. A rundown on the grindhouse theaters and movies of the 60s and 70s on NY's 42 Street. Half of me wishes I had been to these, the other half is glad I didn't. On deck is Eddie Muller's Grindhouse.
    Lou

    Awarded the Krusty Brand Seal of Approval. It's not just good, it's good enough.

  3. #1803
    Current reading: A collection of interviews with the late Octavia Butler. Interesting stuff.
    Do not bug a wombat, 'cause wombats bug back,
    and no-one can live through a wombat attack.

  4. #1804
    Quote Originally Posted by Yodelgoat View Post
    Yes, His mysticism is speculative, but no more so than some of the problems he points out, such as the variance of the speed of light. Once understood better, the reason for it will deepen scientific understanding, rather than just standardizing it and calling everything else outliers. He is also a really smart guy. many have dismissed his speculative conclusions, but I appreciate his observations on how science is becoming dogmatic. Popper is being swept under the rug as funding becomes more and more of a challenge. Science is not cheap any more.
    Understand that when I said he is a "mystical clown," it wasn't a putdown. I was thinking along the lines of the Pueblos sacred clowns.
    Do not bug a wombat, 'cause wombats bug back,
    and no-one can live through a wombat attack.

  5. #1805
    Substitute teacher

    a rather annoying suspense novel involving a murderous substitute teacher. It is annoying in that the characters are unbelievably stereotypical: the overworked school administrator, the uncaring cop writing down details of a kid being killed by a train-flat characters abound. Everybody has these bizarre little obsessive hang ups that make you want to slap the crap out of them.
    "Alienated-so alien I go!"

  6. #1806
    Picture This by Joseph Heller

  7. #1807
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    I'm about to start Jonathan Coe's Middle England, which can be see as Rotter's Club part 3 (Broken Circle being part 2)


    It had been a fair while since the under-average Number 11, which was written by Edgar Allan Coe
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from heroin-addicts to crazy ones

  8. #1808
    Member hippypants's Avatar
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    Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson pretty interesting so far.

  9. #1809
    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    I'm about to start Jonathan Coe's Middle England, which can be see as Rotter's Club part 3 (Broken Circle being part 2)


    It had been a fair while since the under-average Number 11, which was written by Edgar Allan Coe
    I'll wait for the translation, which will be published in March, but the review I read promised a good book, more or less with the Brexit as one of the subjects (and of course Benjamin (T)Rotter's music epos).

  10. #1810
    Doll's Eyes by Bari Wood

  11. #1811
    The Obelisk Gate by N.K. Jemisin. 100 pages in, it's at least as good as the first book; no "middle book of trilogy" weakness here.
    Do not bug a wombat, 'cause wombats bug back,
    and no-one can live through a wombat attack.

  12. #1812
    Member nosebone's Avatar
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    Raymond Carver - Collected Stories
    no tunes, no dynamics, no nosebone

  13. #1813
    Quote Originally Posted by nosebone View Post
    Raymond Carver - Collected Stories
    Oh yeah! Great short story collection. About a decade ago I immersed myself in everything- Raymond Carver and John Cheever.

  14. #1814
    Just finished Dominic Smith's The Last Painting Of Sara de Vos. It's a fine novel about a Dutch femal painter, born in 1606, who painted a picture which would become the subject of forgery in the 20th century. Nice "hopping" in time between the 17th century, the 1950's and 2000. A sad love-story, great information on painting-techniques and the Golden Age (Rembrandt etc.) and even some thriller-elements.

  15. #1815
    And now Book Three, The Stone Sky. This has become so complex that if she pulls off a really satisfying ending she will have my deep, deep respect. (Right now it's only deep.)
    Do not bug a wombat, 'cause wombats bug back,
    and no-one can live through a wombat attack.

  16. #1816
    Member Lou's Avatar
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    You Are Dead (sign here please) by Andrew Stanek

    Nathan is a lovable simpleton who resides in Dead Donkey, Nevada. A simpleton due to the fact that he has a brain lesion which, among other things,
    gives him no fear of death whatsoever. After a nice exchange with a serial killer, Nathan is then shot in the head and killed. Much to his chagrin, Nathan finds
    that the afterlife is run by bureaucrats. His initial confrontation with them is hinged on his refusal to sign a form exempting the bureaucrats from any liability
    in the case of any afterlife injury he might suffer. Then, it starts to get weird!

    Obviously a comedy. Pretty funny, and a cool idea. The author loved it so much that this became a 6 book series. (You are Doomed, You Are a Ghost, You
    are Undead, etc) Best to read them in order, as they all have the same main characters and each book follows the last. I am on number 4. Fans of Christopher
    Moore might like this. It's his kind of absurdity.
    A Comfort Zone is not a Life Sentence

  17. #1817
    Pikachupacabra spellbound's Avatar
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    No Sunscreen For The Dead by Tim Dorsey.

  18. #1818
    Song of Kali by Dan Simmons

  19. #1819
    Quote Originally Posted by Crawford Glissadevil View Post
    Song of Kali by Dan Simmons
    Wow, it's been a long time ago since I read that one. One of his shorter novels.

    This week I started two books (one at home, one in the train): Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tail and Rich Wilson's Time Flies: The Story Of Porcupine Tree.
    First you think: those have nothing in common, but then you read that one of the inspirations for the bandname MAY come from a poem from Atwood with the same title!

    Porcupine Tree (by Margaret Atwood)

    A porcupine tree is always
    dead or half dead with chewed core
    and mangy bark. Droppings drool down it.
    In winter you can see it clear:
    shreds of wood, porcupine piss
    as yellow ice, toothwork, trails to and from
    waddling in the snow. In summer you smell it.
    This tree
    is bigger than the other trees,
    frowsy as my
    room or my vocabulary.
    It does not make
    leaves much anymore,
    only porcupines and porcupines,
    fat, slow and lazy,
    each one a low note, the longest string
    on a cello,
    or like turning over in bed
    under the eiderdown in spring,
    early before the leaves are out;
    sunlight too hot on you through the window,
    your head sodden with marshy dreams
    or like a lungfish burrowed
    into mud. Oh pigsheart. Oh luxury.

    I’ll come around at night
    and gnaw the salt off your hands,
    eat toilet seats and axe handles.
    That is my job in life: to sniff
    your worn skin music,
    to witness the border
    between flesh and the inert,
    lick up dried blood
    soaked into the grain,
    the taste of mortality in the wood.

  20. #1820
    Quote Originally Posted by interbellum View Post
    Wow, it's been a long time ago since I read that one. One of his shorter novels.

    This week I started two books (one at home, one in the train): Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tail and Rich Wilson's Time Flies: The Story Of Porcupine Tree.
    First you think: those have nothing in common, but then you read that one of the inspirations for the bandname MAY come from a poem from Atwood with the same title!
    Yep, it's my second helping of Song of Kali. I've read a few Atwood poems, however I've never come across that one. Co-wink-ee-dink or synergy?

  21. #1821
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by interbellum View Post
    I'll wait for the translation, which will be published in March, but the review I read promised a good book, more or less with the Brexit as one of the subjects (and of course Benjamin (T)Rotter's music epos).
    halfway though this highly enjoyable Rotter's Club Pt 3.... Just arrived at the London 2012 games opening ceremony and the reactions are delectable.

    Found quasi all of the protagonists of the first two books happily without having to go back and find out what they did before or who they were.

    As for Benjie's life oeuvre... I won't spoil it, but ....

    as far as music is concerned, we're more busy with it than in Broken Circle (Ch 2)
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from heroin-addicts to crazy ones

  22. #1822
    The Ballad of Black Tom by Victor Lavalle - a black man in a Lovecraft story -- interesting because Lovecraft was notoriously racist.
    Do not bug a wombat, 'cause wombats bug back,
    and no-one can live through a wombat attack.

  23. #1823
    ^ I like Lovecraftian style horror. I'll have to check out Lavalle.


    "The Descent" by Jeff Long
    Movie of the same name contains similar plot elements but is not based on Long's novel.

  24. #1824
    ^ It might be a good idea to (re-)read Lovecraft's "The Horror at Red Hook" first. This is a deliberate response to that.
    Do not bug a wombat, 'cause wombats bug back,
    and no-one can live through a wombat attack.

  25. #1825
    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    ^ It might be a good idea to (re-)read Lovecraft's "The Horror at Red Hook" first. This is a deliberate response to that.
    In search of nightmare gelatinous columns of foetid oozing purple iridescence, I've dredged tomes and mildewed scrolls for unspeakable hideous accursed tales beyond time. I kid. But seriously, do you like Victor Lavalle writing style? Either way, I'll have to add Victor Lavalle to my list of Cthulhu mythos horror authors like Robert E. Howard, Clark Ashton Smith, Frank Long, T.E.D Klein, Michael Shea, and Brian Keene.
    Last edited by Crawford Glissadevil; 6 Hours Ago at 12:24 PM.

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