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Thread: Being Pink Floyd

  1. #26
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    ^^ As someone who is pro-Israel oriented as I do, Roger Waters' strong pro-Palestinian position casts a shadow to my liking of his interviews and I avoid to listen to them.

  2. #27
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    What's that got to do with the Confy Numb argument of 30 years ago??confused.gif

    and you don't have to tell us of your political stance either, as politics are banned in this site (as you well know in your previous life here, Svety)
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from heroin-addicts to crazy ones

  3. #28
    There's a version of Comfortably Numb from several years ago by Lilian, Janna and Stefan on You Tube. I like it a great deal. They also had a go at High Hopes.

    I read the comments about Gilmour's solo and his playing in general with interest. There's an elegance about it that really appeals to me.

    And so the beautiful sunshine this afternoon was well suited to giving On An Island another listen. Very peaceful and calming. As before, though, no song really stands out for me. Still prefer the DG-helmed Pink Floyd albums.

  4. #29
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    Are we arguing about an argument now?

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Master View Post
    I consider On an Island one of the best albums this millennium so far.
    I have to be in the right mood, but when that mood strikes, it's sublime.

    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu View Post
    Are we arguing about an argument now?
    Welcome to PE.
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  6. #31
    Progdog ThomasKDye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu View Post
    Are we arguing about an argument now?
    "Arf." -- Frank Zappa, "Beauty Knows No Pain" (live version)

  7. #32
    I remember reading in a Pink Floyd fanzine at the time that The Division Bell was released that it would be their last album because they had found getting the thing done so difficult.

    A few years later, when he was promoting Broken China, Rick Wright was asked about another PF album. He replied: 'Possibly. Pink Floyd is like a marriage that is on a permanent trial separation. We tend to record in six and seven year cycles, so it could be the next century before we do anything again.' (Mojo).

    A shame an album of new songs never happened. I do think the hard slog on The Division Bell was worth it. To these Prog Ears it is excellent.

  8. #33
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    Waters and Mason seem to be genuine friends (after the 80s split caused tension, they reconciled somewhere in the 2000s). However, Waters once said that any notion of them being a 'band of brothers' died after Syd Barrett left. Having said that I don't get the sense that relations were too bad until the time of The Wall, particularly between Wright and Waters. And then there was a total collapse between Gilmour/Waters with The Final Cut.

    I find Gilmour-Floyd and Gilmour-solo much easier on the ears than Waters' solo output, but none of it is really as good as what they did together IMHO. The Division Bell, I like it up to about 'Wearing The Inside Out' and then the last track 'High Hopes'. Some of the more 'stadium rock' type songs I find very flabby now ('Keep Talking', 'Take It Back'). I'm not as fond of 'Coming Back To Life' as Gilmour seems to be.

  9. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    Waters and Mason seem to be genuine friends (after the 80s split caused tension, they reconciled somewhere in the 2000s). However, Waters once said that any notion of them being a 'band of brothers' died after Syd Barrett left. Having said that I don't get the sense that relations were too bad until the time of The Wall, particularly between Wright and Waters. And then there was a total collapse between Gilmour/Waters with The Final Cut.
    .
    Gilmour said there was always tension between him and Waters. They always argued about this or that when they were working on something, but they were always able to come up with a compromise, until they got to The Wall. He said that they hired Chris Thomas to mix Dark Side Of The Moon, and theory, they were supposed to leave Chris to do the job by himself. Well, Dave found on the first day, Roger showed up to "assist" or "guide" or whatever. So on the second day, Dave showed up, to counter-balance Roger's input. He said that Roger wanted to make Dark Side Of The Moon a very "dry" record (i.e. with little echo or reverb on the overall mix), and Dave wanted to go in the opposite direction.

    That comes from an article that Guitar World published in February of 1993, I believe. They asked Dave about a few songs from throughout the band's career, and when talking about Money, he brought up the above.

  10. #35
    Member Since: 3/27/2002 MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iris View Post
    I read the comments about Gilmour's solo and his playing in general with interest. There's an elegance about it that really appeals to me.

    And so the beautiful sunshine this afternoon was well suited to giving On An Island another listen. Very peaceful and calming. As before, though, no song really stands out for me. Still prefer the DG-helmed Pink Floyd albums.
    indeed, I like DG's slow tasty approach. I don't listen to Pink Floyd when I want fast licks. I have Satriani records for that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Iris View Post
    Found a review of The Division Bell from I think Mojo which thinks High Hopes 'would effortlessly sail on to any six track best of Floyd.'
    as for High Hopes, it's an excellent piece that is equal to Comfortably Numb IMO. But regarding Pink Floyd after Animals, my "top 6" (why 6?) would be CN, HH, On The Turning Away, Sorrow, Keep Talking, Side 1 of The Endless River and honorable mention to Marooned
    Last edited by MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER; 5 Days Ago at 02:39 AM.
    Why is it whenever someone mentions an artist that was clearly progressive (yet not the Symph weenie definition of Prog) do certain people feel compelled to snort "thats not Prog" like a whiny 5th grader?

  11. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    Waters and Mason seem to be genuine friends (after the 80s split caused tension, they reconciled somewhere in the 2000s). However, Waters once said that any notion of them being a 'band of brothers' died after Syd Barrett left. Having said that I don't get the sense that relations were too bad until the time of The Wall, particularly between Wright and Waters. And then there was a total collapse between Gilmour/Waters with The Final Cut.

    I find Gilmour-Floyd and Gilmour-solo much easier on the ears than Waters' solo output, but none of it is really as good as what they did together IMHO. The Division Bell, I like it up to about 'Wearing The Inside Out' and then the last track 'High Hopes'. Some of the more 'stadium rock' type songs I find very flabby now ('Keep Talking', 'Take It Back'). I'm not as fond of 'Coming Back To Life' as Gilmour seems to be.

    I was surprised to discover how much I liked Waters' last album. I am so used to his voice that I don't even think about it now.

    Broken China, I have always found hard going. Given its subject matter, I guess that shouldn't be a surprise. Sweet July is the best track on it for me. Haven't heard Wright's two other solo albums. What are they like?

  12. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER View Post
    indeed, I like DG's slow tasty approach. I don't listen to Pink Floyd when I want fast licks. I have Satriani records for that.



    as for High Hopes, it's an excellent piece that is equal to Comfortably Numb IMO. But regarding Pink Floyd after Animals, my "top 6" (why 6?) would be CN, HH, On The Turning Away, Sorrow, Keep Talking, Side 1 of The Endless River and honorable mention to Marooned

    Yes, On The Turning Away. Written for the days when an album needed a side 1 closer!

    Wasn't there a plan to re-release A Momentary Lapse of Reason with more contributions from Wright? Anyone know anything about this?

  13. #38
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    Waters and Mason seem to be genuine friends (after the 80s split caused tension, they reconciled somewhere in the 2000s). However, Waters once said that any notion of them being a 'band of brothers' died after Syd Barrett left. Having said that I don't get the sense that relations were too bad until the time of The Wall, particularly between Wright and Waters. And then there was a total collapse between Gilmour/Waters with The Final Cut.

    I find Gilmour-Floyd and Gilmour-solo much easier on the ears than Waters' solo output, but none of it is really as good as what they did together IMHO. The Division Bell, I like it up to about 'Wearing The Inside Out' and then the last track 'High Hopes'. Some of the more 'stadium rock' type songs I find very flabby now ('Keep Talking', 'Take It Back'). I'm not as fond of 'Coming Back To Life' as Gilmour seems to be.
    There was apparently always a small rift between the second (classic) quartet's members, with the "engineers" on one side (Mason & Waters were in the same Uni branch & studies, architecture) and what was called the "musicians" with Gilmour & Wright on the other side.

    TBH, if I like a lot Gilmour's first solo album, I think his better musical ideas were used for that one, though one would argue that whatever his input is on The Wall is still quite brilliant. AF and OIA are not good albums, though I'll save Murder (he must've been thinking of Ol' Rog ) and the relatively interesting near-instrumental Take A Breath (the second part). And his latest has three good track (the instrumentals).
    The one thing about Gilmour's solo output is it can be played as background music, something which totally impossible with Waters' solo efforts (though his Latest is the better in that regard)... From P&C to Kaos to Amused, you have to follow closely and immerse yourself in it or it becomes an impossible imbroglio to untangle. Roger's music requires total involvment (>95%, IMHO) from the listener or else his music can be thought of as annoying

    Quote Originally Posted by Iris View Post
    I was surprised to discover how much I liked Waters' last album. I am so used to his voice that I don't even think about it now.

    Broken China, I have always found hard going. Given its subject matter, I guess that shouldn't be a surprise. Sweet July is the best track on it for me. Haven't heard Wright's two other solo albums. What are they like?
    As for Wright, Wet Dreams was very much Alan Parsons-y (in a good way) in in some ways is just as good as Gilmour's first album, but BC was a total bore (as +/- were his two tracks on TDB): don't get me wrong, it's not that BC is bad per se (on the contrary), but at the end of the disc, you're glad it's over and retained nothing.
    Last edited by Trane; 5 Days Ago at 04:27 AM.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from heroin-addicts to crazy ones

  14. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    .(though I'll save Murder - he must've beeen thinking of Ol' Rog -.
    Actually, Murder is about John Lennon's death. That's mentioned in at least one of the Pink Floyd books I have. That's why there's the couplet "Did you get rid of the voices in your head/Do you now miss them/And the things they said", because he was addressing Mark David Chapman, as it were.

    Wasn't there a plan to re-release A Momentary Lapse of Reason with more contributions from Wright? Anyone know anything about this?
    I kept hearing talk of a remixed version that would be "less 80's sounding" than what we have, but I never knew if that was just a rumor, or some facetious comment Gilmour or Mason might have made at some point that people took more seriously than they had intended. (shrug)

    As for adding more contributions from Wright, I'm not sure there's much you can do in that field. As I understand it, they had already recorded most of the keyboards already by the time Rick was summoned to the sessions. Apparently, most of what he did was a bit of background vocals and a little Hammond organ backing here or there. According to the Nicholas Schaeffner book, he only recorded one solo for the record, for On The Turning Away, but they didn't use it because "it didn't fit".

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    The one thing about Gilmour"s solo output is it can be played as background music, something which totally impossible with Waters' solo efforts (though his Latest is the beter in that regard)... From P&C to Kaos to Amused, you have to follow closely and immerse yourself in it or it becomes an impossible imbroglio to untangle. Roger's music requires total involvment (>95%, IMHO) from the listener or else his music can be thought of as annoying
    Amused To Death was a very good album but, as with his others, it's very wordy. I'd imagine it's going on ten years since I played Pros/Cons or KAOS. I'll remedy that.

    Gilmour's solo albums are basically sound. It's- again- the stadium rock tracks like 'Take A Breath' I could do without. He also really forces his vocals on things like 'All Lovers Are Deranged'.

    Making AMLOR 'less 80s'...there were suggestions this could have been done with the multi-tracks they had from live shows on that tour. Then again, Delicate Sound Of Thunder already offers that IMHO (Mason with a better drum sound and more Wright involvement)...the main reason I keep that live album.

  16. #41
    I still regard Amused To Death as being a true classic, one of those rare albums which will still be incredible and important in many years to come.

    Radio Kaos was a good album. The Welsh choir sequences were recorded just down the road from me. I rarely listen to Hitchhiking any more, and, in truth, find the last one to be merely okay. Too preachy, without the exceptional music which lifted Amused to Death.

    I never did really enjoy any of the other band members solo outings, although I will put on a Gilmour album if I feel like an easy listen whilst working from home instead of the radio, which just about says it all, really.

  17. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    Amused To Death was a very good album but, as with his others, it's very wordy. I'd imagine it's going on ten years since I played Pros/Cons or KAOS. I'll remedy that.

    Gilmour's solo albums are basically sound. It's- again- the stadium rock tracks like 'Take A Breath' I could do without. He also really forces his vocals on things like 'All Lovers Are Deranged'.

    Making AMLOR 'less 80s'...there were suggestions this could have been done with the multi-tracks they had from live shows on that tour. Then again, Delicate Sound Of Thunder already offers that IMHO (Mason with a better drum sound and more Wright involvement)...the main reason I keep that live album.

    That is what I had read. I'd quite like an enhanced edition of A Momentary Lapse of Reason because I do like the album. It did seem like a significant moment when it came out - Pink Floyd were still a going concern and the trailer Learning To Fly suggested the wares were going to be very good.

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iris View Post
    I was surprised to discover how much I liked Waters' last album. I am so used to his voice that I don't even think about it now.

    Broken China, I have always found hard going. Given its subject matter, I guess that shouldn't be a surprise. Sweet July is the best track on it for me. Haven't heard Wright's two other solo albums. What are they like?
    As much as I like Wrights solo stuff within the group, his early songs mostly, and Sisyphus, I find his solo LPs mediocre, boring to hell, frankly. I like however the song "Voices", which reminds of his PF input.

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iris View Post
    That is what I had read. I'd quite like an enhanced edition of A Momentary Lapse of Reason because I do like the album. It did seem like a significant moment when it came out - Pink Floyd were still a going concern and the trailer Learning To Fly suggested the wares were going to be very good.
    I don't much care for 'One Slip' or 'The Dogs Of War', the latter has that unfortunate 'grunting' vocal from Gilmour again. I think the other songs hold up although the production definitely does not. Possibly the most time-locked 'Floyd album in that respect.

  20. #45
    Progdog ThomasKDye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iris View Post
    Broken China, I have always found hard going.
    I so wanted to like that album, but it was SO boring. It was pretty much an entire album of "Wearing the Inside Out," only not as good.
    "Arf." -- Frank Zappa, "Beauty Knows No Pain" (live version)

  21. #46
    June issue of UK mag Uncut has lengthy feature about the early part of the Floyd's career with new contributions from the surviving members and those who worked with the band. Mason spoke in person and is the main voice but Gilmour also pops up a few times and Waters once. Don't think it adds much to the story but they all seem at ease with their history. 'The way it happened made sense' (Gilmour).

  22. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by IncogNeato View Post
    Yeah, those guys know each other very, very well. Given all they've been through, there's probably just not much to collectively chat about.




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