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Thread: I still want to buy CDs, but...

  1. #101
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
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    I practice a very good backup regimen, so burning my downloads to CD would be a complete waste of time, space, and money spent on blank media and jewel cases. Not only that, but the toner for my color laser printer, and the heavy bond paper on which to print inserts. My backup regimen is so good in fact, I still have every single download I've ever purchased, including the ones from Mindawn when there was a Mindawn.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  2. #102
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu View Post
    Cheapest postage in Europe to the USA. I look for German sellers on Discogs.
    I just payed 5,95 euros in postage for 4 rubberbands (for my CD-player) sent from Germany to Denmark (next door). weight, probably 5 gram.

  3. #103
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
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    The way I listen to classical at home requires a digital file, even if ripped from a CD. I wrote a program which creates a video file, pictured in the below screenshot. During a soft passage when I have the volume cranked to hear it, the video indicates when it's about to get very loud. I can then hit the volume down button on my remote, thus not pissing off the neighbors. All I have to do is load a set of files, optionally edit which ID3 tag items to use, and press start. I can then go to bed or work, take a shower, eat dinner, or whatever. When it's finished creating the videos, it'll shut down the computer automatically. When I watch and listen to the videos, I can simply delete them, so they don't take up unnecessary drive space.

    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  4. #104
    Member Kcrimso's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    The way I listen to classical at home requires a digital file, even if ripped from a CD. I wrote a program which creates a video file, pictured in the below screenshot. During a soft passage when I have the volume cranked to hear it, the video indicates when it's about to get very loud.
    Constantly changing the volume does not impact your enjoyment of the music? I mean for me that approach would destroy the dynamics that composer has meant music to have.
    "A waste of talent and electricity." John Peel on ELP

  5. #105
    I'm between CDs ripped to Apple Lossless (with subsequent addition of hi-res album cover so it looks good on my iPhone screen) or just a straight Bandcamp or HDtracks.com download (FLAC). I never buy lossy formats. You can get very small sized hard drives up to 8TB right now for around $150 so just download and keep them all there and backed up elsewhere too. It took a while but I ripped almost all of my 30 years of CD purchases to Apple Lossless at a leisurely pace that took around a year to complete.

  6. #106
    Casanova TCC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wiz_d_kidd View Post
    I did some investigation into which media sales are better for musicians. Here's what I found (in Nov 2017)...

    If an artist or band is unsigned, they can make the most money by selling a physical album themselves. That's because there's no middle man, so they earn 100% of the profits. But, putting together the upfront money to create a CD can be difficult for many musicians, so they turn to digital services. In that case, their best bet is selling album downloads with a distributor through cdbaby, ReverbNation or tunecore. With those services, the artist can earn $8.99 if they sell an album for $9.99.

    Bandcamp is another good choice for musicians, because they can earn $8.50 for every $10 album they sell. Popular services like iTunes, Amazon and Google Play aren't such a good deal. A $9.99 album on iTunes will earn a signed artist just $1.11. Single track downloads that cost $0.99 will earn signed artists only $0.11 on iTunes, Google Play and Amazon.

    Unsigned artists, on the other hand, can earn $0.69 per $0.99 download on iTunes.

    Streaming services aren't a great deal for musicians, either. Unsigned artists earn $0.0179 per play on Google Play and signed artists take home even less, around $0.0073 per play. On Spotify, unsigned artists receive $0.007 per play, and signed musicians get $0.0011 per play.

    Bandcamp makes money through their revenue share on sales, which is 15% for digital, 10% for merch. If an artist or label makes $5,000 worth of annual sales, then they are only charged 10% of the profit from digital sales.

    So Bandcamp digital download is good for the musicians (but not Amazon or iTunes), and it is the most convenient thing for me. I carry over 4500 tracks with me at all times on my phone. I won't ever go back to this crap...
    Attachment 12845
    Interesting!
    Thanks for sharing!!.

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kcrimso View Post
    Constantly changing the volume does not impact your enjoyment of the music? I mean for me that approach would destroy the dynamics that composer has meant music to have.
    I get what you are saying, but this is something that has always frustrated me about classical music. The quiet parts can be so quiet and the loud parts so much louder than the quiet parts, that it can be frustrating to listen to...for me, anyway.

    neil

  8. #108
    I buy CD's, and will probably continue to do so until they stop making them altogether. I have bought a few download over the years, mostly because that was the only option available to me. I really don't have any kind of rational explanation for why I just buy CD's. It's the only format I've used since I was 18 (though for at least 10 years I copied them to cassette because that's what my cars had in them back then) and I do still read the booklets and "fondle" them as the music is playing. My 2013 car has a CD player in it. It has USB ports, but I've not bothered to try to plug anything into them.

    I have pretty much my whole collection ripped to my PC, which is what I listen on in the house most of the time. The rest of the time it's the stereo with CD's.

    I totally get why people have abandoned physical media, and really don't get why people are so enamored of vinyl, particularly when almost all of that vinyl has a digital source for the music you are listening to on it (i.e., it was never recorded analog to begin with, and even with older albums, the source is usually digital and not analog tape). I was never much in to vinyl even when it was the only way (aside from cassettes) to buy music for me.

    Still, I don't begrudge anyone for their preferences. Whatever works. I will continue to enjoy my CD's as long as I can.

  9. #109
    I am 100% all about the music. That said, I still prefer and collect physical product (CDs, LPs, DVDs). My total collection is about 1400 pcs at the moment. Not as many as some folks (I have friends who have well over 10,000 pcs) but I try to curate more than "buy everything". I only want to own music I know I want to search for, pick out, and listen to on purpose. There's other stuff I like, but I'm happy to hear a few songs on Spotify and go back to my regular place. I don't feel the need to own everything, but if I love it and it turns me on, I MUST own it.

  10. #110
    Moderator Poisoned Youth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by infandous View Post
    I have pretty much my whole collection ripped to my PC, which is what I listen on in the house most of the time. The rest of the time it's the stereo with CD's.

    I totally get why people have abandoned physical media, and really don't get why people are so enamored of vinyl, particularly when almost all of that vinyl has a digital source for the music you are listening to on it (i.e., it was never recorded analog to begin with, and even with older albums, the source is usually digital and not analog tape). I was never much in to vinyl even when it was the only way (aside from cassettes) to buy music for me.

    Still, I don't begrudge anyone for their preferences. Whatever works.

    After reading many of these posts, I feel more at ease with eschewing physical media. Yes, I do still purchase some CDs and rip them/shelve them, but my listening experience is now almost 100% electronic file and streaming.


    Quote Originally Posted by IncogNeato View Post
    I am 100% all about the music.
    Me as well. The conversion of my collection to MP3s, etc. altered the way I can listen to my collection forever. That I can access any album or song in my collection at any time, that I can create very robust playlists in the process is really the significant advantage that no physical media can compete with.

    It's liberating to be able to access ones collection in this manner, not to mention the portability factor. There are so many albums/artists/songs I re-discovered and explored in the process that were previously resting on a shelf, which has been a priceless experience for me. To go back would be like wearing shackles.
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  11. #111
    Member Rajaz's Avatar
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    I live in Canada like some of you who previously posted here; well, I hate to break it to you but the CD prices are going to get worse or I mean, more expensive.
    Mainly due to the weakening "loonie" as they call the Canadian dollar. Also, here in Canada we have the highest sales taxes with that dreaded GST like in Quebec is 14.97% and 13% in most provinces, compounded with shipping costs, yes those CDs can be very expensive.

    I buy my CDs through Amazon USA and I go pick them up at a drop-off locker whenever I go to the states. It has worked perfectly for me.

    https://business.financialpost.com/n...lowing-economy

  12. #112
    Quote Originally Posted by Poisoned Youth View Post
    After reading many of these posts, I feel more at ease with eschewing physical media. Yes, I do still purchase some CDs and rip them/shelve them, but my listening experience is now almost 100% electronic file and streaming.

    Me as well. The conversion of my collection to MP3s, etc. altered the way I can listen to my collection forever. That I can access any album or song in my collection at any time, that I can create very robust playlists in the process is really the significant advantage that no physical media can compete with.

    It's liberating to be able to access ones collection in this manner, not to mention the portability factor. There are so many albums/artists/songs I re-discovered and explored in the process that were previously resting on a shelf, which has been a priceless experience for me. To go back would be like wearing shackles.
    Most of my actual listening is purely digital, since it takes place in my car (no CD player, I use a flash drive) and at work (Spotify/YouTube). When I am home, I'll put something on the turntable or in the CD player IF I have time to stay in my space and listen. If I'm in the house working, I have an old iPhone with a Bose dock that I'll stream Spotify on. So, I absolutely have zero problem with enjoying music digitally.

  13. #113
    Member Jay.Dee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisoned Youth View Post
    Me as well. The conversion of my collection to MP3s, etc. altered the way I can listen to my collection forever. That I can access any album or song in my collection at any time, that I can create very robust playlists in the process is really the significant advantage that no physical media can compete with.

    It's liberating to be able to access ones collection in this manner, not to mention the portability factor. There are so many albums/artists/songs I re-discovered and explored in the process that were previously resting on a shelf, which has been a priceless experience for me. To go back would be like wearing shackles.
    One man's odious shackles are the other man's blessed anchor.

    For any itch-scratching, discovery or singles-oriented playback I have streaming platforms, for everything else CDs are just perfect for me.

    The whole set of rituals like going to a (local) store for a hunt, having a quick chat with clerks, or while at home scanning the shelves, picking a disc, putting it into player, glancing at the sleeve (notes)... priceless. I have enough of virtual high-tech environment at work, so for my leisure time there's nothing better than an album or a book in hand. It's definitely old-school, but it works for me.

    Also the principal reason I have never been seduced by random, playlist or zapping playback is that I mostly collect and listen to live recordings. Therefore for me it makes no sense to jump from one track to another, because I prefer to immerse in a concert-like experience, where there is a longer, deliberately conceived, sequence of music performed by the same artist around/at the same time. I also rarely listen to multiple recordings in one go; I prefer a bit of silence between each session, so a pause for changing a disc makes absolute sense to me (unless it is a marathon two-three CD performance, which is the only case I wish CD had a bigger capacity).

    There's place for everything under the sun.

  14. #114
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kcrimso View Post
    Constantly changing the volume does not impact your enjoyment of the music? I mean for me that approach would destroy the dynamics that composer has meant music to have.
    It's still preferable to audio compression or auto level control.
    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  15. #115
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisoned Youth View Post
    Me as well. The conversion of my collection to MP3s, etc. altered the way I can listen to my collection forever. That I can access any album or song in my collection at any time, that I can create very robust playlists in the process is really the significant advantage that no physical media can compete with.

    It's liberating to be able to access ones collection in this manner, not to mention the portability factor. There are so many albums/artists/songs I re-discovered and explored in the process that were previously resting on a shelf, which has been a priceless experience for me. To go back would be like wearing shackles.
    iPod - the single greatest invention in the last 20 years.
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  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad View Post
    iPod - the single greatest invention in the last 20 years.
    I respectfully completely disagree. It has devalued music with convenience over quality of sound and experience.

  17. #117
    Member dropforge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay.Dee View Post
    One man's odious shackles are the other man's blessed anchor.

    For any itch-scratching, discovery or singles-oriented playback I have streaming platforms, for everything else CDs are just perfect for me.

    The whole set of rituals like going to a (local) store for a hunt, having a quick chat with clerks, or while at home scanning the shelves, picking a disc, putting it into player, glancing at the sleeve (notes)... priceless. I have enough of virtual high-tech environment at work, so for my leisure time there's nothing better than an album or a book in hand. It's definitely old-school, but it works for me.

    Also the principal reason I have never been seduced by random, playlist or zapping playback is that I mostly collect and listen to live recordings. Therefore for me it makes no sense to jump from one track to another, because I prefer to immerse in a concert-like experience, where there is a longer, deliberately conceived, sequence of music performed by the same artist around/at the same time. I also rarely listen to multiple recordings in one go; I prefer a bit of silence between each session, so a pause for changing a disc makes absolute sense to me (unless it is a marathon two-three CD performance, which is the only case I wish CD had a bigger capacity).

    There's place for everything under the sun.
    I thought I was the only guy like that.

  18. #118
    Moderator Poisoned Youth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay.Dee View Post
    The whole set of rituals like going to a (local) store for a hunt, having a quick chat with clerks, or while at home scanning the shelves, picking a disc, putting it into player, glancing at the sleeve (notes)... priceless. I have enough of virtual high-tech environment at work, so for my leisure time there's nothing better than an album or a book in hand. It's definitely old-school, but it works for me.
    And that's great. I enjoyed all of those things once upon a time. The "hunt" was good for a while, then became laborious. Then I was bidding on 10-20 CDs at a time on eBay and placing binge orders at vendor websites. Then I spent more hours and hours of time pruning and selling CDs I regretted purchasing in the first place. I still have my bookshelves of CDs to fondle if I ever feel so inclined. But for me, I did those things because there was no other choice. Now I have one, thankfully.
    WANTED: Sig-worthy quote.

  19. #119
    Quote Originally Posted by Poisoned Youth View Post
    And that's great. I enjoyed all of those things once upon a time. The "hunt" was good for a while, then became laborious. Then I was bidding on 10-20 CDs at a time on eBay and placing binge orders at vendor websites. Then I spent more hours and hours of time pruning and selling CDs I regretted purchasing in the first place. I still have my bookshelves of CDs to fondle if I ever feel so inclined. But for me, I did those things because there was no other choice. Now I have one, thankfully.
    I, too, enjoy "the hunt". But I also know the pain of regretting purchases. Digital is a fantastic way to try and avoid future regret by previewing new bands/albums. Something else that impedes the hunt is the lack of physical outlets. There used to be tons of record shops...now they are few and far between.

  20. #120
    Member Jay.Dee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisoned Youth View Post
    And that's great. I enjoyed all of those things once upon a time. The "hunt" was good for a while, then became laborious. Then I was bidding on 10-20 CDs at a time on eBay and placing binge orders at vendor websites. Then I spent more hours and hours of time pruning and selling CDs I regretted purchasing in the first place.
    Wow, during my 15 years spent on eBay I have not reached 50 orders yet! I guess I have been more prudent with casual purchases, although I have also weeded a fair share of CDs over last few years. That's always a pleasure for me though, going through all the cases covered by dust just to re-discover forgotten jewels (or cringe with incredulity at what I enjoyed once). At the end I rarely regretted buying anything, because without this experience I might not have progressed.

    I suppose people with huge collections and insatiable appetite for music may burn out more easily, because they are bound to lose control over the sheer mass of physical artefacts at some point and the pleasure becomes a burden.

    Fortunately my focus has been always on curating than hoarding, so I treated my collection a bit like a Buddhist mandala. You put an effort to build it, then you destroy it to be able to start again fresh and hungry! Therefore I had no remorse ditching my large cassette collection (built since my teenage years) and replacing it with a more expertly curated set of CDs. And I did not re-buy 80% of the music I had on tape, because I moved on to explore new pastures. Over the years I would periodically trim my CD collection, so some 500 discs (and counting, 30% of the current size) would find new owners making thus room for more exciting music.

    My unachievable goal is to have a perfect collection where there were no weak entry, each single release on my shelf ought to be stellar. I am still a long way from getting asymptotically close to that ideal, especially that some newly released or discovered stuff crush some of the old favourites, but with present streaming options I am able to make a pre-selection better than ever before. It's a never-ending thrill!
    Last edited by Jay.Dee; 5 Hours Ago at 04:48 PM.

  21. #121
    Insect Overlord Progatron's Avatar
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    I often think about going through my collection and pruning it a bit, selling off maybe 100 CDs or so... but every time I start scanning the shelves, I come up with reasons why I need them all.
    Two boys have been found rubbing linseed oil into the school cormorant.

  22. #122
    Member Since: 3/27/2002 MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boilk View Post
    I get what you are saying, but this is something that has always frustrated me about classical music. The quiet parts can be so quiet and the loud parts so much louder than the quiet parts, that it can be frustrating to listen to...for me, anyway.

    neil
    if you digitally brickwall them that will solve your volume knob twiddling
    Why is it whenever someone mentions an artist that was clearly progressive (yet not the Symph weenie definition of Prog) do certain people feel compelled to snort "thats not Prog" like a whiny 5th grader?

  23. #123
    Member dropforge's Avatar
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    So come on, I'm the twiddler
    I have a func and a knob to play
    Get ready for the twiddler
    I twiddle along on the seventh day —
    Twiddle along on the seventh day

  24. #124
    Jazzbo manqué Mister Triscuits's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post
    So come on, I'm the twiddler
    I have a func and a knob to play
    Get ready for the twiddler
    I twiddle along on the seventh day —
    Twiddle along on the seventh day
    "Holy potentiometers, Batman, it's the Twiddler!"

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