Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 29 of 29

Thread: What did each member contribute to the Moody Blues?

  1. #26
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brussels
    Posts
    2,831
    Quote Originally Posted by dnieper View Post
    In all seriousness, I'd say Justin Hayward was responsible for about 60-80 percent of what was good about the Moody Blues. Lodge and Thomas each wrote 2or 3 good songs, and Pinder and Edge were competent at their instruments but not creative forces.
    More 60% than 80%, then (40% is more like it, IMHO), but YMMV...
    You seem to diminish greatly Pinder's role, but TBH, I have no interest in TMB without him (even once replaced by Moraz)

    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Triscuits View Post
    Hayward is certainly the heart of the band. Don't completely agree about Pinder, who wrote some very cool songs, especially the magnificent "Have You Heard/The Voyage" and his contributions to Lost Chord, but he gets docked a point for the stupid anti-evolution line in "How Is It We Are Here."
    Yup, Pinder tracks would probably get the majority (or at least the most of the 5) of my play list, if I was to do a CD-r compilation of their "classic 7", and 80% of my choice would concentrate on Lost Chord, Threshold and Children's.

    Quote Originally Posted by bRETT View Post
    Things were pretty close to fully democratic in the classic era-- Lost Chord even had an entire side with no Hayward songs (and it's still one of their greatest album sides). This of course changed in the reunion era, and it became very much a two-man operation by the time they stopped recording.
    Yup, Lost Chord is my fave (by a margin) of theirs and Side 1 especially.
    The only album of theirs that I still own today, though I may buy their next two again some day

    Quote Originally Posted by Iris View Post
    And as for John Lodge, though I wouldn't be bothered if I never heard I'm Just A Singer or even Isn't Life Strange again I would miss things like House of Four Doors, Candle Of Life and Out And In. Sweet songs those.
    Mmmhhh!!!.... I got in TMB through 7th Sojourn and Balance, but today, I wouldn't play them at all if I chose to hear something from the band

    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    When Pinder went the more experimental side of the band went with him, but I suppose it wasn't much in evidence on Octave either.
    Pinder was great to counter Hayward's and Thomas' ad nauseam tendencies to go pop, IMHO

    Quote Originally Posted by bill g View Post
    Mike Pinder wrote 'My Song', 'Have You Heard/The Voyage', 'Lost in a Lost World', 'When You're A Free Man', I think co wrote 'Out and In', all really nice. The only one I don't care for as much of his is 'Melancholy Man', but then that isn't my favorite album anyway compared to the other classics.
    Yup, though an early fave , I found it almost nauseating for a couple of decades, with its stripped-down song approach and will to make hits

    I should maybe reinvestigate.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Triscuits View Post
    Not to mention "Ride My See-Saw," one of my favorites. The whole ISOTLC album is for me the Moodies' pinnacle.
    Yeah, DoFP is over-rated, and Threshold and Childrens' Children's are also quite good (not so warm or positive to what's coming afterwards), but it's definitely Lost Chord that gets me going on them.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from heroin-addicts to crazy ones

  2. #27
    Member Paulrus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    The Left Coast
    Posts
    1,051
    Quote Originally Posted by Trane View Post
    Pinder was great to counter Hayward's and Thomas' ad nauseam tendencies to go pop, IMHO
    Hmmm, then I wonder what you make of "A Simple Game", which is clearly a Pinder track and won the Ivor Novello award.
    I'm holding out for the Wilson-mixed 5.1 super-duper walletbuster special anniversary extra adjectives edition.

  3. #28
    I think they each offered a unique and personal point of view to the Moody Blues song compositions. No where is that more evident than on their greatest album (argue amongst yourselves), Days of Future Past.

    Graeme Edge was responsible for the intro and outro ("The Day Begins", "Late Lament")
    Lodge wrote "Peak Hour" and "(Evening) Time to Get Away"
    Hayward wrote "Forever Tuesday (Afternoon?) and "Nights in White Satin"
    Thomas wrote "Another Morning" and "Twilight Time"
    Pinder wrote "Dawn is a Feeling" and "The Sunset"

    Each composer and song has a different feeling, but they are indivisible and part of the whole. Quite an admirable bit of democratic composition and one of the great rock albums of all time.
    "And your little sister's immaculate virginity wings away on the bony shoulders of a young horse named George who stole surreptitiously into her geography revision."

    Occasional musical musings on https://darkelffile.blogspot.com/

  4. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by The Dark Elf View Post
    I think they each offered a unique and personal point of view to the Moody Blues song compositions. No where is that more evident than on their greatest album (argue amongst yourselves), Days of Future Past.

    Graeme Edge was responsible for the intro and outro ("The Day Begins", "Late Lament")
    Lodge wrote "Peak Hour" and "(Evening) Time to Get Away"
    Hayward wrote "Forever Tuesday (Afternoon?) and "Nights in White Satin"
    Thomas wrote "Another Morning" and "Twilight Time"
    Pinder wrote "Dawn is a Feeling" and "The Sunset"

    Each composer and song has a different feeling, but they are indivisible and part of the whole. Quite an admirable bit of democratic composition and one of the great rock albums of all time.
    +1
    The White Zone is for loading and unloading only. If you got to load or unload go to the White Zone.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •