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Thread: Help me understand Led Zeppelin?

  1. #176
    Member Vic2012's Avatar
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    ^ True. But, they did it on their debut, which is amazing.

  2. #177
    I suppose they'll have to revoke my Musical Snobbery Card of Smarmy Critiques, but I've always enjoyed Led Zeppelin. I would say Physical Graffiti is my favorite, with IV and III following. The only album I really don't care for is In Through the Out Door, and I feel secretly that John Bonham actually died of chagrin after making that album.

    I would not expect anyone to understand, nor do I feel it necessary to explain it to you. They were simply one of the greatest rock and roll bands.

    All I would like to add is that in the 70s, it seemed if you were out and about and conscious at about 4:00 in the morning, you were certain to hear "When the Levee Breaks". At least from what little I recall.
    "And your little sister's immaculate virginity wings away on the bony shoulders of a young horse named George who stole surreptitiously into her geography revision."

    Occasional musical musings on https://darkelffile.blogspot.com/

  3. #178
    Member Vic2012's Avatar
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    But I want to understand the phenomenon that surrounds them, why so many people think they are the peak of rock'n'roll. So please help me understand.
    Personally, I think you have to be a bit of a metal fan to understand Zeppelin. They were pioneers of heavy guitar rock. The songs were great, the musicianship was great. I'm referring to the studio albums mainly. Even when they were acoustic there was a heaviness in their music. Very powerful, groovy band. They can't please everyone but they pleased enough of us.

  4. #179
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    Good point. Even half the acoustic songs still rumble with a primal power. Bonham was capable of laying back but obviously on those numbers Page wanted him swinging for the fences.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  5. #180
    Member Vic2012's Avatar
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    I think IV is my favorite LZ album after it's all said and done. It was my gateway to metal and blues. It was the first of their albums I ever bought or heard. It was a sledgehammer to the chest. And yet, it was Celtic and folky in spots.

  6. #181
    I was never a big fan of Page's productions. IV was one example that, IMO, had too much mid-range and buried JPJ's bass.
    The White Zone is for loading and unloading only. If you got to load or unload go to the White Zone.

  7. #182
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adm.Kirk View Post
    I think Physical Graffiti and In Through The Out Door are the most varied. Those two albums had a little of everything.

    Bill
    TBH, that's definitely not what I'm looking at in an album... I'm looking for a directions, even if it meanders a bit, but I'm really not keen when it goes left; right, centre and nowhere, just for the sake of "variety"

    To me, Graffiti is an amalgam of bottom of drawers, extra tracks that didn't make it on previous albums and a few new tracks.
    It was all put (should I say "thrown") together without much thoughts as to construct something that made sense... Outside some longer tracks (Kashmir, In The Light, My Time Of Dying and 10 Years Gone and the short Bron, most of PG, I'd like to forget I ever heard them. Of course, you'll tell me that those five tracks mill a full disc, and maybe that selection would make a more coherent album.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from heroin-addicts to crazy ones

  8. #183
    Member Vic2012's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronmac View Post
    I was never a big fan of Page's productions. IV was one example that, IMO, had too much mid-range and buried JPJ's bass.
    I never noticed that. It was heavy to me. Black Dog blew my mind the first time I heard it, at 12-13 years old. It was heavy, riffy, and sexy as hell.

  9. #184
    Jon Neudorf
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    They're frickin great. I don't know how to describe them. I think you either get them or you don't. There's no magic formula. Its subjective. It just so happened they clicked with alot of people, including me. I would try Physical Graffiti then go to LZ III. Then IV and after that II and I. There is something to love in all their albums but don't tell my wife that. She doesn't get it.

    Jon

  10. #185
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    Yesterday I actually read the lyric to Kashmir to see if Led Zeppelin could help me understand what was going on in that region of the world (I didn't really expect it would). The lyric didn't help, but it was interesting to read it as opposed to hearing it.

  11. #186
    Not a big fan of the blues, so i'm not really a big fan of Zeppelin, but i can't say i don't like them.
    I understand why they are an important band.

    Songs like Achilles Last Stand, Immigrant Song, Kashmir i really like.Other bluesier songs bore me to tears.

    I always preferred Deep Purple or Sabbath from that era of heavy/ hard rock.

  12. #187
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    Kashmir is actually inspired by a road trip to southern Morocco that Plant took. Kashmir worked better in the lyrics than Morocco.

    And then there's this:

    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  13. #188
    The thing about Zep was that they turned me on to blues and prog. I liked the extended, longer material and I wanted to seek out more of that which took me to bands like Yes, Uriah Heep, King Crimson, Yes, Deep Purple and so on. At the same time, I wanted to know who that Willie Dixon guy was that wrote You Shook Me. That took me not only to Willie Dixon but to Muddy Waters, Robert Johnson, Son House and many others.

    Bill
    She'll be standing on the bar soon
    With a fish head and a harpoon
    and a fake beard plastered on her brow.

  14. #189
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo View Post
    Kashmir is actually inspired by a road trip to southern Morocco that Plant took. Kashmir worked better in the lyrics than Morocco.
    Then why in the world not use "Tangier?" It's the same rhythmically and even rhymes similarly...
    Ring the bells, that still can ring,
    Forget your perfect offering.
    There is a crack - a crack in everything.
    That's how the light gets in.

  15. #190
    ^^ artistic license
    The White Zone is for loading and unloading only. If you got to load or unload go to the White Zone.

  16. #191
    cunning linguist 3LockBox's Avatar
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    ^^ I thought it was about a sweater

  17. #192
    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    Then why in the world not use "Tangier?" It's the same rhythmically and even rhymes similarly...
    Tangier's a city, not a region; hardly somewhere you'd go for an epic trek. Well, maybe...

  18. #193
    Member hippypants's Avatar
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    Plant is still making music that's interesting. I caught his Sensational Space Shifters on Austin City Limits and it was a really cool concert with interesting renditions of some of Zepplin's older songs and others.

  19. #194
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    Then why in the world not use "Tangier?" It's the same rhythmically and even rhymes similarly...
    To avoid confusion with "Tangerine"?

  20. #195
    Quote Originally Posted by Stevie B View Post
    To avoid confusion with "Tangerine"?
    I was going to say that and then I remembered Bron-yr-Aur and Bron-y-Aur Stomp.

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