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Thread: Roxy Music- Are they truly worthy of being a Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame nominee?

  1. #26
    Barely known, geez, you have high standards. 3 of their 8 studio albums were top 40 in the US, Manifesto made it as high as #23, a lot of bands would kill to be that well known. They were also a staple of early MTV. And I'd say their influence was greater than their chart success.

    On a personal note I never saw Roxy Music but in 2017 the 72 year old Bryan Ferry filled a 3000 seat theater in my small hometown and impressed the heck out of me

  2. #27
    Jazzbo manqué Mister Triscuits's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wah3 View Post
    Barely known, geez, you have high standards. 3 of their 8 studio albums were top 40 in the US
    ...and Avalon wasn't even one of them. Yet it sold so steadily for so long that it ended up being certified platinum in the US, which shows how chart rankings can be deceiving.

  3. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    Well, I largely agree. Perhaps not "holiness" but a purported untouchability. The thing about all of those three, however, is that there's such a phenomenal leap from their best to their worst work - and yet for some reason they're always only held to account for the former. I suppose it's the Lou Reed-factor of things, this in extension of the Dylan-factor.

    As for Roxy's lack of naivité, or perhaps innocence, the self-assured nature of their aesthetic (musically and conceptually) was a very prime asset and principle. Kitsch is mostly "good" only when intended, says art-theory, although "goodness" may be invested also un unintended kitsch when purveyors of such theory see fit to acknowledge it. Which of course they hardly ever did with "regular" progressive rock artists, as opposed to names like Roxy, Bowie, Eno etc. An interesting footnote to this is the case of Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel, whose first two records are as "meta-levelled" as anything by Bowie or Roxy at the time, and still acknowledgement has largely eluded them.
    100% in agreement yet sadly, I’ve only heard one song on US radio by Steve Harley on a consistent basis in “Delilah” which is nowhere near as brilliant as the band’s overall work. I also agree with Slade as well.
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  4. #29
    Progga mogrooves's Avatar
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    On the musical merits, yes! Pop music for smart people.
    Michael: "Harold, don't you have any other music, you know, from [last] century?"
    Harold: "There is no other music....."

  5. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    The thing about all of those three, however, is that there's such a phenomenal leap from their best to their worst work - and yet for some reason they're always only held to account for the former. I suppose it's the Lou Reed-factor of things, this in extension of the Dylan-factor.
    This is a very interesting point, and one that I had never really noticed until seeing it here just now. And don't get me wrong, I'm a great admirer of Bowie, Eno, and Byrne! So I'm guilty of it myself too, apparently.

    The Lou Reed-factor (and Dylan-factor), I'm definitely gonna have to remember that. (and I'm really not a fan of Lou Reed, although I respect him for his influence, same as for Dylan.)

  6. #31
    If only for the album cover on Country Life
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  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paulrus View Post
    If Roxy were to get in then shouldn't Slade also? There's another UK band barely known in the states but considered widely influential.
    In early 70s UK, the singles charts belonged to Slade and T. Rex. From late 1970 through to 1973 or so, every single they released made Number 1 or came close. In the UK both would have been inducted a couple of decades ago, probably.

    Slade became very influential on US bands; I think you can draw a line from them to Kiss in terms of rabble-rousing anthems, but in the 80s you had Twisted Sister and Quiet Riot covering Slade (the latter with a hit single).

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Triscuits View Post
    ...and Avalon wasn't even one of them. Yet it sold so steadily for so long that it ended up being certified platinum in the US, which shows how chart rankings can be deceiving.
    I had no idea! I thought that was a high charter in the US.

    I think Avalon is the most consistent of the 'comeback' albums. Manifesto is half-great, especially the sinister title track, which I see as being of a piece with Bowie's 'Berlin' period and Scott Walker's Nite Flights songs. But there's some average songs like the flop first single 'Trash' and duds like 'Ain't That So' and 'Cry Cry Cry'. I don't think much of Flesh And Blood beyond some of the singles...let down by some average cover versions.

  9. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Triscuits View Post
    ...and Avalon wasn't even one of them. Yet it sold so steadily for so long that it ended up being certified platinum in the US, which shows how chart rankings can be deceiving.
    True enough. Touch Of Grey might have been the Grateful Dead's only top ten hit, and In The Dark might have been the only album they didn't went platinum "right out of the chute" (as Bob Weir put it at the time), but several of their early 70's albums, over time, were certified platinum, because they sold steadily.

    Likewise, I recall reading that when Kiss released their solo albums in 1978, Gene Simmons' charted the highest (probably because everyone expected the man who sang God Of Thunder and Calling Doctor Love to do something "heavy", whatever that might entail), but in fact, it was Ace Frehley's that ended up outselling the other three, over time.

    Slade became very influential on US bands; I think you can draw a line from them to Kiss in terms of rabble-rousing anthems,
    I remember someone joking that he liked Kiss a lot better when they were called Slade. Paul Stanley certainly has talked about the influence of both Slade and The Move. And yeah, you can definitely see a relationship between something like Cum On Feel The Noize (which has another of my favorite intros) to Rock And Roll All Nite, Tomorrow And Tonight, etc.

    but in the 80s you had Twisted Sister and Quiet Riot covering Slade (the latter with a hit single).
    When did Twisted Sister cover Slade? I don't remember that one. I, of course, remember Quiet Riot's version of Cum On Feel The Noize (which they claim they did under duress) and then trying to follow it with Mamma Weer All Crazee Now, which flopped. Incidentally, there was an Irish power trio called Mama's Boys, who also did a version of Mama Weer All Crazee Now, which I thought totally buried the Quiet Riot version.

    The thing I found intriguing about the Quiet Riot thing (apart from the fact that their second stab at a Slade cover didn't live up to anyone's expectations), was the fact that Slade soon afterwards signed a new US record deal, and their new label promoted their new US album by playing off the Quiet Riot cover (the first one, not the second one, I imagine) which in turn generated Slade's only Stateside chart showings, with Run Runaway and My Oh My (both of which are great songs, btw).

    Back to Roxy Music: A few years ago, one of the first things I bought when I was finally employed again was the Roxy Music boxset, with all their studio albums in it, which demonstrates that they're one of the very few bands who were smart enough to walk away at the right time. There's a few songs I could take or leave, but again, there's no Face Dances or Dirty Work or People Like Us in their catalog. There's not many bands, apart from The Police, and maybe a few others. Most of my favorite bands overstayed their welcome at one point or another.

  10. #35
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    'Let The Good Times Roll/Feel So Fine' was done by Twisted Sister live and is on their best of...I always assumed that was because of Slade's own version of this exact same medley on their 1972 album Slayed.

    Oasis were definitely also heavily influenced by Slade, again covering 'Cum On Feel The Noize' in the 90s. I think Cheap Trick covered a Slade album track, 'When The Lights Go Out', although I have not heard it. Slade they also had some great ballads like 'Everyday' and 'How Does It Feel' and the quirky Beatle-esque 'My Friend Stan', which probably are completely unknown in the US.

    Sure, some comedian on here will say 'influencing hair metal lol no wonder they are not in'. I can't say some of the 80s synth/New Wave stuff which bore Bowie and Roxy Music's influence was all that great either. But influence is influence.
    Last edited by JJ88; 1 Week Ago at 07:02 AM.

  11. #36
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    From ‘Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: Induction Process...’

    “ELIGIBILITY:
    Artists—a group encompassing performers, composers and/or musicians—become eligible for induction 25 years after the release of their first commercial recording. Besides demonstrating unquestionable musical excellence and talent, inductees will have had a significant impact on the development, evolution and preservation of rock & roll....

    Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Award for Musical Excellence:
    This award honors performers, songwriters and producers who have changed the course of music history. These artists have dedicated their lives to creating influential, important music infused with originality, and have achieved a level of timeless distinction.”

  12. #37
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    "...will have had a significant impact on the development, evolution and preservation of rock & roll...."

    Roxy Music ?

  13. #38
    If Def Leppard can get nominated, why not Roxy Music?

  14. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Zeuhlmate View Post
    "...will have had a significant impact on the development, evolution and preservation of rock & roll...."

    Roxy Music ?
    Really? Very influential in the glam, punk, new wave/alternative scenes and even prog genres. With all the crap silly bands already inducted in the Hall, I'm amazed that people in the progressive rock "club" would question the credentials of a band like Roxy Music. The Cure, Ultravox, Morrissey and a whole slew of 80s bands can be traced directly back to them. Jan Wenner compatriots?

    I love revisiting their early live TV appearances on shows like Musikladen, Beat Club etc. Do the Strand always tickles me.
    Last edited by DocProgger; 1 Week Ago at 09:40 AM.

  15. #40
    Member Paulrus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DocProgger View Post
    Really? Very influential in the glam, punk, new wave/alternative scenes and even prog genres.
    And elsewhere. I remember an interview with Nile Rogers where he said his late 70s group Chic had been heavily influenced by Roxy after he saw them perform in the UK. He liked how Ferry had created an entire aesthetic that was wrapped around the music.
    I'm holding out for the Wilson-mixed 5.1 super-duper walletbuster special anniversary extra adjectives edition.

  16. #41
    Progga mogrooves's Avatar
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    When I first heard the Cars and Talking Heads my first thought was Roxy Music.
    Michael: "Harold, don't you have any other music, you know, from [last] century?"
    Harold: "There is no other music....."

  17. #42
    Pikachupacabra spellbound's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88
    I don't think much of Flesh And Blood beyond some of the singles...let down by some average cover versions.
    While not their best album, Flesh + Blood had good covers of Eight Miles High and In The Midnight Hour that pleased this lover of the Byrds and Pickett originals. And the Roxy songs Oh Yeah and Over You are highlights of the album, for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by mogrooves
    When I first heard the Cars and Talking Heads my first thought was Roxy Music.
    Same here.

  18. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    'Let The Good Times Roll/Feel So Fine' was done by Twisted Sister live and is on their best of...I always assumed that was because of Slade's own version of this exact same medley on their 1972 album Slayed.
    Could be. It's certainly not beyond the realm of probability that Dee Snider and company were listening to Slade.
    Oasis were definitely also heavily influenced by Slade, again covering 'Cum On Feel The Noize' in the 90s.
    Oh, my, that must be hilarious, Noel Gallagher mumbling his way through a Slade song.
    I think Cheap Trick covered a Slade album track, 'When The Lights Go Out', although I have not heard it.
    I'm not familiar with it either, but again, given that they also did at least one Move cover, it makes sense that Rick Nielsen would more than a little conversant on Cheap Trick. You can certainly hear a similarity between Noddy Holder and Robin Zander, now that you mention it.
    Slade they also had some great ballads like 'Everyday' and 'How Does It Feel' and the quirky Beatle-esque 'My Friend Stan', which probably are completely unknown in the US.
    "Completely unknown" doesn't even begin to describe it. I remember when I was in Paris, I visited the Center Du Pompidou, the sort of modern art museum, and they have an entire floor devoted to motion pictures. One of the films they show (or were showing at the time, this was 12 years ago), in a small theater, was something called Two Impossible Films, which is basically the opening and closing credits to two mythical, otherwise unmade films. One of them, over the closing credits, I'm listening to this song that's playing, this real melodic sort of power ballad kind of thing, and I'm thinking, "Damn, who is this, I know that singer's voice". So it gets towards the end of the credits, where they usually list songs that are used in a film, and I realized why I recognized the vocalist: it was Everyday, which I hadn't ever remember hearing before. Now, I don't claim to know every song that was popular Stateside, but something like that, from a band like Slade, if it had been successful here, I'm sure I would have heard it before 2006.


    Sure, some comedian on here will say 'influencing hair metal lol no wonder they are not in'. I can't say some of the 80s synth/New Wave stuff which bore Bowie and Roxy Music's influence was all that great either. But influence is influence.
    Well, what most people refer to as "hair metal", in my mind at least, breaks down into two different things. The early/mid 80's glam metal stuff I think in general is relatively good. There's good songs, good guitar playing, good riffs, melodic sing along choruses, everything a good rock n roll band needs. But then around '86 or '87, you get into the sort of Poison/Warrant/Firehouse era, where the balance of image vs music shifted way too far in the wrong direction. It was like the rock music part of the music industry got taken over by the teen idol/boy band division. It was an insult to the genre. No wonder grunge "had to happen". Oy!

  19. #44
    I suppose they'll make it in some day, so those who voted for them can say they're cool for even knowing who they were, even though Roxy Music epitomizes the opposite of fame.

    Seems like a perfect fit.
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  20. #45
    Geriatric Anomaly progeezer's Avatar
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    Based on the travesty of who's already in the RRHOF without remotely being close to deserving, Roxy should be a shoo-in both for their own catalog and even more for the bands and music they spawned imo.
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  21. #46
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    I move that we found a Rock and Roll Hall of Infamy. Maybe more suitable for Roxy Music.

  22. #47
    roxy_music_IX_069.jpg

    Congratulations to one of my all time favorite bands on their induction into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame.

    Charles
    Be a loyal plastic robot for a world that doesn't care... Frank Zappa

  23. #48
    Great News!! I'm glad that Roxy Music is now in the R&RHOF (and I feel that they truly deserve it for being a huge influence on 1970's Glam & New Wave Rock).

  24. #49
    Member Paulrus's Avatar
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    Woot! Congrats. I think I'm happiest for Phil Manzanera and Eno. It's probably the closest Eddie Jobson and the late John Wetton will ever get!
    I'm holding out for the Wilson-mixed 5.1 super-duper walletbuster special anniversary extra adjectives edition.

  25. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by Paulrus View Post
    Woot! Congrats. I think I'm happiest for Phil Manzanera and Eno. It's probably the closest Eddie Jobson and the late John Wetton will ever get!
    PS; Eddie Jobson made the cut as part of Roxy according to the R&RHOF list-
    Bryan Ferry
    Brian Eno
    Andy Mackay
    Phil Manzanera
    Eddie Jobson
    Paul Thompson
    Graham Simpson
    John Gustafson

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