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Thread: If music is dying, why are there so many great releases and live shows in 2018?

  1. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisK View Post
    ... but we had tapes in the 70's.
    Yes, as did I. But that real-time, one copy at a time between a couple of friends is not even on a comparable scale to mass, globally available high-def sound files shared instantly by countless people at the click of a mouse.

    I also taught my (now adult) son to appreciate the art he enjoys. He currently has 400+ CDs in his collection. Not to mention BRD, DVD, & books.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by IncogNeato View Post
    I would still wager that if those millions of young people in the 70s had a free option, most of them would have taken it.

    .
    No doubt about it. Look at all the gate crashing that happened at big festivals back in the day with Woodstock being a prime example.

  3. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    No doubt about it. Look at all the gate crashing that happened at big festivals back in the day with Woodstock being a prime example.
    Well of course a bunch of Neanderthal baby boomers are gonna gate crash. So uncouth to us more refined Gen-Xers.

  4. #54
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boilk View Post

    I hear some people talk (not so much on this site), as if the the fact that arena rock is in its death throes, equates with the end of 'good' music itself, and nothing could be further from the truth. As Kavus, Bob and others have said, if you don't think there is any great, exciting new music being made, then you aren't looking very hard.
    I've always disliked stadium or hockey arena concerts, but didn't have much of a choice, cos that's where the band were playing ...I wouldn't be unhappy if either diaspeared, but this is not likely to happen, except for "rock" music... Something I didn't really need back then: I wouldn't say I suffer from agoraphobia, but I don't feel well (never did) in huge crowds and being channeled like cattle to a "slaughterhouse"

    Pop and Hop stars and DJ (look at Tomorrow Land, held over two w-e some 30 kmw north of here and hosting some 400k spectators) are filling stadiums the way Zep and The Who were back then.

    Kids nowadays still feel the need to have these huge musical masses...


    Quote Originally Posted by IncogNeato View Post
    The amount of people who are actual fans of music, who truly connect with an artist, or a style, or something beyond "that song", are the folks who are left. Us. WE were always a fraction of the whole. WE still buy music and engage with music and connect with art in a way that folks who just like "that song" can't and don't. So, when the forest fire of the digital revolution settled, WE are the ones who are left...still standing.

    Everyone else "outgrew" music, or still only like "that song", or have just moved on to other things. Music never truly connected with them. That's OK. It's not going to connect with everyone. But we now have an entire generation of young people who have grown up with free music. Some of them will connect with it and engage in it on a deeper level at some point, but most of them won't.
    This is important: it's not like every high-school kids bought loads of albums, let alone rock albums...

    When girls bought records, that was less than 50%, and doing "collections", i'd say less than 5%, it was more like Elton, Bay City Rollers and ABBA, while when guys did I'd have the %ages hovering at 70% for occasional record buying (and that included those buying classical) and not more than 15% investing in many records.
    As a member of the football team, I'd say that only 10% of the dudes bought records,and half of those were black dudes investing in funk records;

    How many of those heavy buyers are still buying music, today?? I'd say anywhere between 30 and 60% , the rest having outgrown it ... Not to mention those that bought many albums just aping (monkey see, monkey do) the crowd they wanted to belong to.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from heroin-addicts to crazy ones

  5. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by Farpoint Kevin View Post
    selling CDs over the internet has dropped to a trickle. For me this means supplementing with teaching lessons, recording/mixing for other artists, renting out PA, etc. and all of that means less time practicing, writing, arranging, recording, mixing, releasing, and promoting my own music.
    Here lies the big picture problem.

  6. #56
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    That is one way to look at it. However, the big picture, is that this is the way things are, and will continue to be. It will be the norm, and yet great music is still being made, and will keep getting made. One day, almost all physical product will be so far in the past, that the vast majority won't even be giving it a second thought, let alone consider it an obstacle.

    neil

  7. #57
    Quote Originally Posted by boilk View Post
    That is one way to look at it. However, the big picture, is that this is the way things are, and will continue to be. It will be the norm, and yet great music is still being made, and will keep getting made. One day, almost all physical product will be so far in the past, that the vast majority won't even be giving it a second thought, let alone consider it an obstacle.

    neil
    Or, someday, a great band, maybe a more modern contemporary band will refuse to participate in the complicity of the issue, see it as a real problem, and simply refuse to participate.

    One way to do this would simply refuse to put anything online or even release music in any kind of digital form.

    Suppose a band like Radiohead makes their greatest album but only releases it on vinyl. What then? It would be a game changer for sure.

  8. #58
    ALL ACCESS Gruno's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skullhead View Post
    Suppose a band like Radiohead makes their greatest album but only releases it on vinyl. What then? It would be a game changer for sure.
    A game changer because someone will buy that vinyl, transfer that vinyl to a digital format, and upload it to a torrent site? That's a game changer!

  9. #59
    Member Vic2012's Avatar
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    I've accepted (At 60 years of age) that the only new (to me) music I'll be hearing from now on is on Youtube. Brick and mortar shops are dead and dying, and I prefer not to buy downloads or order music through online sources. But purchasing physical product has become more trouble than it's worth to me. As long as there's free WiFi and YT doesn't charge a subscription fee (which astounds me), I have access to lots of albums I'd never hear otherwise. I have a sizeable CD collection as well and don't plan on getting rid of them.

  10. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by Skullhead View Post

    Suppose a band like Radiohead makes their greatest album but only releases it on vinyl. What then? It would be a game changer for sure.
    Better yet, release it only on cassette. That'll teach the music industry!

  11. #61
    Occipital Provocatee Plasmatopia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gruno View Post
    A game changer because someone will buy that vinyl, transfer that vinyl to a digital format, and upload it to a torrent site? That's a game changer!
    My thoughts exactly. I'd then take the WAV files and load 'em right into iTunes lossy format too.
    Let's blow this dinosaur heap.

  12. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by Gruno View Post
    A game changer because someone will buy that vinyl, transfer that vinyl to a digital format, and upload it to a torrent site? That's a game changer!
    But there could be serious legal ramifications for doing that. Put one or two kids in prison for 5 or 10 years and it would quickly send a message across the internet very quickly. This is where social media could actually help out.

  13. #63
    ALL ACCESS Gruno's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skullhead View Post
    But there could be serious legal ramifications for doing that. Put one or two kids in prison for 5 or 10 years and it would quickly send a message across the internet very quickly. This is where social media could actually help out.
    ...and how has that worked out for the "one or two kids" that have been used as an example of what you are referring to? Did that kill illegal file sharing?

  14. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by Skullhead View Post
    But there could be serious legal ramifications for doing that. Put one or two kids in prison for 5 or 10 years and it would quickly send a message across the internet very quickly. This is where social media could actually help out.
    It's like trying to sue a single fish in the ocean...all the other ones just keep swimming. If there was a way to curb downloading, it would have been found by now.

  15. #65
    Moderator Poisoned Youth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skullhead View Post
    One way to do this would simply refuse to put anything online or even release music in any kind of digital form.

    Suppose a band like Radiohead makes their greatest album but only releases it on vinyl. What then? It would be a game changer for sure.
    Quote Originally Posted by Gruno View Post
    A game changer because someone will buy that vinyl, transfer that vinyl to a digital format, and upload it to a torrent site? That's a game changer!

    And ironic considering that Radiohead's "game changer" was to release In Rainbows as a DIGITAL ONLY "pay what you want" download only release.
    WANTED: Sig-worthy quote.

  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisoned Youth View Post
    And ironic considering that Radiohead's "game changer" was to release In Rainbows as a DIGITAL ONLY "pay what you want" download only release.
    Beat me to it!

    neil

  17. #67
    Quote Originally Posted by Gruno View Post
    ...and how has that worked out for the "one or two kids" that have been used as an example of what you are referring to? Did that kill illegal file sharing?
    It could take care of things in a society of law and order. I suppose that goes into a political conversation which is not what these forums promote.

  18. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by boilk View Post
    Beat me to it!

    neil
    A band that seems to surprise people could switch to all vinyl. They would seem like the band to do it. Or it could be some other band.... or new bands could just release on vinyl only and refuse to be complicit. They are not making money anyway... so why not? Vinyl is cool and trendy again.. correct?

  19. #69
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skullhead View Post
    Or, someday, a great band, maybe a more modern contemporary band will refuse to participate in the complicity of the issue, see it as a real problem, and simply refuse to participate.

    One way to do this would simply refuse to put anything online or even release music in any kind of digital form.

    Suppose a band like Radiohead makes their greatest album but only releases it on vinyl. What then? It would be a game changer for sure.
    Adele did that a few years back, only releasing physical mediums and the insudtry had its biggest year selling vintyls & CDs in at least half a decade

    Quote Originally Posted by yamishogun View Post
    Better yet, release it only on cassette. That'll teach the music industry!
    some idiots have tried that in the last two or three years
    Last edited by Trane; 2 Weeks Ago at 03:45 AM.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from heroin-addicts to crazy ones

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skullhead View Post
    A band that seems to surprise people could switch to all vinyl. They would seem like the band to do it. Or it could be some other band.... or new bands could just release on vinyl only and refuse to be complicit. They are not making money anyway... so why not? Vinyl is cool and trendy again.. correct?
    A lot of people love vinyl, but.... and I've spoken to a fair number of bands about this, many of them lose money by pressing vinyl, some saying they would never do it again. It is not cheap, or easy to arrange. Heck, I want a vinyl of my bands album, but it would probably be for our personal satisfaction, and we would lose money on it. We have made a tidy sum off of bandcamp (as they treat musicians fairly, unlike Spotify), so can't imagine not releasing music that way. And as has been pointed out above, vinyl can still be ripped and uploaded.

    No one can predict the future, but one seems to be certain: great music is still being made. 2018 has been my best year as a listener, in a long time. The fact that it won't stop, seems almost incontrovertible, at this point. Bent Knee, Thank You Scientist, The Mercury Tree and IZZ, just to name a few, are all working on releases for next year. We're at the tip of the iceberg with how music is being made and distributed. Once people adapt to the way things are, or don't even have any first hand knowledge of how things were, the likelihood is, that it will get better, not worse.

    neil

  21. #71
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yamishogun View Post
    Better yet, release it only on cassette. That'll teach the music industry!
    If you look around Bandcamp, there are some bands who issue new releases in 3 formats: CD, vinyl & cassette. The cassettes are the ones which are SOLD OUT. Smaller runs, or buyer preference?
    "If you want to see the true nature of humanity, just look at the internet."

    http://www.discogs.com/user/moecurlythanu/collection

  22. #72
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skullhead View Post
    Or, someday, a great band, maybe a more modern contemporary band will refuse to participate in the complicity of the issue, see it as a real problem, and simply refuse to participate.
    Or a great sculptor, painter, or writer. Herman Melville never knew financial success.
    "Of course you are allowed to trumpet your profound ignorance by disagreeing with me." -- Facelift

  23. #73
    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    Or a great sculptor, painter, or writer. Herman Melville never knew financial success.
    Actually, his first couple of books (Typee and Omoo) were big best sellers. It was Moby-Dick that was a failure.
    Do not bug a wombat, 'cause wombats bug back,
    and no-one can live through a wombat attack.

  24. #74
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    Actually, his first couple of books (Typee and Omoo) were big best sellers. It was Moby-Dick that was a failure.
    Damn you! Yes, I wasn't thinking!
    "Of course you are allowed to trumpet your profound ignorance by disagreeing with me." -- Facelift

  25. #75
    Quote Originally Posted by Skullhead View Post
    But there could be serious legal ramifications for doing that. Put one or two kids in prison for 5 or 10 years and it would quickly send a message across the internet very quickly. This is where social media could actually help out.
    Nobody is getting put in prison for 5 or 10 years for uploading an album. Because that would be totally and utterly stupid.

    Equally, no band with any commercial ambitions is going to stick to a vinyl-only, no digital policy as all that would achieve would be to radically limit their (paying) audience and their earnings.

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