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Thread: Rolling Stones announce 2019 US tour

  1. #26
    Member frinspar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve F. View Post
    I saw them way past their prime - and that was 30 years ago, and yknow? They were really good!
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    I don't know. I have the DVD from their Hyde Park show a couple of years ago and I think it kicks ass. Mick is in amazing physical shape for his age, and the rest of the guys all still play well.
    That's actually nice to hear. It's no fun watching people go through the motions, but if they're still willing and able to put on a good show and make you believe it all, that's worth it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave (in MA) View Post

  2. #27
    Progga mogrooves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    Was this the Madison Square Garden show in the Gimme Shelter film?
    Baltimore; one or two songs iirc.
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  3. #28
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    Yes, that's right- Ya Ya's... was also heavily overdubbed by Jagger in particular. The infamous Live'R Than You'll Ever Be bootleg from this tour was from Oakland. The latter is not an especially great performance, IMHO, but it allows one to hear a complete concert from the tour- the acoustic blues set was completely excluded from ...Ya Ya's.

    There was a re-release of Ya Ya's with extra tracks but unfortunately not integrated into the album...I think they were on a separate disc.

  4. #29
    PE Member since 7/14/2001 rushfan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    That would be my preferred show, too, actually, based on what's in the Let's Spend The Night Together film, Duke Ellington as play on music, the band kicks off with Under My Thumb, ends with (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction, and most of what I would want to hear the Stones play in between (well, within reason, one can't expect them to do something like Yesterday's Papers or Ride On Baby).

    Plus, Keith playing Telecasters all night long (on later tours, he started playing an assortment of different makes and models, though I believe he still uses a couple Telecasters for the open G songs). Yeah, I know, which guitar Keith plays is irrelevant, but I dug that black Telecaster Custom he used for the standard tuned numbers during that era.
    The Tattoo You tour was great, although very expensive at the time - a whopping $35.00!

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  5. #30
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    Only around a third of the material they did on that 1981/2 tour was older than 1978. The nostalgia set-lists started in 1989/90.

    Very little of Undercover or Dirty Work have ever played live because those albums were not toured at all. This was the time when personal relations between Jagger/Richards were at a low-point, and Watts developed a drug problem.

  6. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by rushfan View Post
    The Tattoo You tour was great, although very expensive at the time - a whopping $35.00!
    I remember seeing THe Grateful Dead in 1990, and I remember having to go to a "ticket broker" (read: legalized scalper) and pay $40, I think. And I remember thinking, "FORTY DOLLARS!!! That's a lot of money". Now you can't even get into an arena show for forty bucks, much less get a reasonably decent seat like the one I had that night.

    (Note: when I saw the surviving Dead members when they were touring as The Other Ones in 2003, I got a third row seat at the box office, for $45 bucks! Of course, they didn't have lasers, pyro or any other such extracurricular matters, save for a projection screen that showed a psychedelic light show, and a minimalist light truss above the stage)

  7. #32
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    why not, everyone else seems to be touring next year.

  8. #33
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    Don't the Stones use that 'lucky dip' system where you might- or indeed, might not!- get a good seat at a more reasonable price?

  9. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    I remember seeing THe Grateful Dead in 1990, and I remember having to go to a "ticket broker" (read: legalized scalper) and pay $40, I think. And I remember thinking, "FORTY DOLLARS!!! That's a lot of money". Now you can't even get into an arena show for forty bucks, much less get a reasonably decent seat like the one I had that night.
    $40 in 1990 is $80 now but the cheapest Rolling Stones ticket in Chicago is $254 and most are $300-$400 with a high of $750.

    And people here complained that ARW tickets started at $45...

  10. #35
    I remember seeing Rodney Dangerfield around 1982 and some people literally brought signs to complain about the $8.00 ticket prices.
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  11. #36
    Progga mogrooves's Avatar
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    Ticket prices have always seemed high. I recall being stunned by the $7.00 Hendrix tickets in '68; but I paid it.
    Michael: "Harold, don't you have any other music, you know, from [last] century?"
    Harold: "There is no other music....."

  12. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post

    Very little of Undercover or Dirty Work have ever played live because those albums were not toured at all. This was the time when personal relations between Jagger/Richards were at a low-point, and Watts developed a drug problem.
    I guess the way the cycled from 69-81 or so, they'd tour the US one year, followed by an appreciable break, then tour Europe and the UK the following year, and then the third year, they'd stay off the road. I recall reading it was pointed out that they basically toured more or less for every other album. So, for instance, they toured behind Some Girls and Tattoo You, but not Emotional Rescue or Undercover.

    But I think by the time they made Dirty Work, it was "time to tour" again, and they didn't go for it. Someone help me out here, did Dirty Work come before or after Mick's first solo record? Then as I recall, somewhere in there, Keith also did a solo record.

    $40 in 1990 is $80 now but the cheapest Rolling Stones ticket in Chicago is $254 and most are $300-$400 with a high of $750.
    Yeah, that's what I'm saying. Right now, 80 bucks for a decent concert seat would seem like a good deal.
    I remember seeing Rodney Dangerfield around 1982 and some people literally brought signs to complain about the $8.00 ticket prices.
    In one of the Grateful Dead books I have, someone talks about hanging around the Fillmore East and hearing people complain about how Bill Graham "sold out" by upping his ticket prices to 5 bucks. Five bucks to see the Dead (with Pigpen!), the Allman Bros (with Duane!!) and Fleetwood Mac (with Greeny!!!). ALL ON THE SAME NIGHT! 5 bucks to see Miles Davis on any one of the four nights he recorded At Fillmore. And so on.

  13. #38
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    Chris, that's the era that Richards refers to as "WWIII". Mick's first solo record came out before Dirty Work. Mick refused to tour in support of DW and Keith was furious. Jagger made the right call - it likely saved Charlie's life and maybe Keith's. The guy was drinking Jack Daniels by the half gallon then. Keith's first solo record came out in 1988. The band really didn't make up until 1989 for Steel Wheels and the subsequent tour. The Glimmer Twins settled into a more business relationship and then that nearly fractured with Keith releasing his autobiography. Richards had to do some sort of face-to-face apology for that but the rift was rumored to be only somewhat healed.
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  14. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo View Post
    Chris, that's the era that Richards refers to as "WWIII". Mick's first solo record came out before Dirty Work. Mick refused to tour in support of DW and Keith was furious. Jagger made the right call - it likely saved Charlie's life and maybe Keith's. The guy was drinking Jack Daniels by the half gallon then. Keith's first solo record came out in 1988. The band really didn't make up until 1989 for Steel Wheels and the subsequent tour. The Glimmer Twins settled into a more business relationship and then that nearly fractured with Keith releasing his autobiography. Richards had to do some sort of face-to-face apology for that but the rift was rumored to be only somewhat healed.
    I couldn't remember the exact sequence of events, but I remember hearing years later that Keith was upset that Mick was doing solo stuff (two solo albums, and somewhere in there, I believe Mick did a solo tour, with Joe Satriani, of all people, on guitar). When a couple o fthe guys from Living Colour appeared on That Metal Show, Vernon Reid told a story about bumping into Keith at a party in NYC, just after Vernon had played on Mick's second solo record. Vernon, thinking it would be something to have a conversation about, says, "I just played on a session for Mick", and he said he could tell from the look on Keith's face, that the whole idea of a "Mick Jagger solo album" bugged the frell out of him.

    But you're probably right, the band was surely in no shape to go on the road in the mid 80's. Wasn't that during that era where Mick supposedly called up to Charlie's hotel room, asking, "Where the hell is my drummer?!", so Charlie went down to the lobby and punched Mick, saying, "Don't ever call me 'your drummer'! You're my singer!"

  15. #40
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    There have been suggestions that Jagger/Richards have been getting on much better in recent years, but the latter still puts his foot in it now and again in his interviews.

    I seem to recall some of the controversy over Jagger's solo output was the way it had supposedly been made part of the Stones' deal with Columbia. I think Richards was very aggrieved about that. But it's fair to say none of Jagger's solo albums made him like Phil Collins or whoever- a superstar as a solo artist in his own right.

  16. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    But it's fair to say none of Jagger's solo albums made him like Phil Collins or whoever- a superstar as a solo artist in his own right.
    Well, Mick was kind of already a "superstar", you couldn't get much bigger than that. ANyone who knew anything about rock music knew who Mick Jagger was. But yeah, I imagine his solo records didn't sell the way Phil's. But I'm sure at least She's The Boss sold at least better than any of Tony Banks'.

    But you remind me now of the Live Aid concert, where Mick, Keith and Woody all performed, but not together. Mick did a short solo set backed by whichever musicians who were backing, I think, all the solo artists they strung together during that part of the show. It was like Mick doing a few songs, then Tina Turner doing a few, then Hall & Oates, something like that. Woody and Keith did an acoustic set backing Bob Dylan. That was I think like one of the points where it really became publicly known that, ok, something "not right" was going on in Rolling Stones Land.

  17. #42
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    What I meant was that his solo output didn't really sell beyond those already interested in the Stones- She's The Boss was as good as it got, really because it was the first one. Beyond the obvious 'Dancing In The Street' cover with Bowie, I think his solo stuff is virtually forgotten now, actually. I think Richards' solo work is better regarded.

    Jagger's solo career had a few things I like such as 'Evening Gown' and 'Angel In My Heart'. But I don't like it so much when he goes for 'contemporary' sounds...and even less when that ends up on Stones records ('Anybody Seen My Baby'??).

  18. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    What I meant was that his solo output didn't really sell beyond those already interested in the Stones- She's The Boss was as good as it got, really because it was the first one. Beyond the obvious 'Dancing In The Street' cover with Bowie, I think his solo stuff is virtually forgotten now, actually.
    .
    Well, yeah, but then so is Undercover and Dirty Work. I mean, really, when was the last time you heard Harlem Shuffle anywhere? I couldn't tell you when the last time I saw the videos for that or Too Much Blood or One Hit To The Body.

    She's The Boss at least had the benefit of Jeff Beck playing on some of the songs. I remember a report on MTV that while Jeff was cutting solos, Mick, as a joke, decided to tell the engineer that one particular take was "Awful! Wipe it!", and that pissed Jeff off so much that he stormed out of the studio. So Mick had to follow after him and tell him he was just farting around with him and he didn't really think the solo was that bad, etc. So he gets Jeff to come back to the studio, only to find that the engineer didn't know Mick was just kidding, so he actually erased the solo. Oops.

    And I agree, I don't dig Mick's habit of wanting the Stones to "do whatever he's heard at disco the night before" (as Keith once put it). Some of that stuff works alright, like Undercover Of The Night. The only thing about Has Anybody Seen My Baby was it's resemblance to that one KD Lang song Constant Craving (which I keep hearing at work), though at least the Stones had the decency to put her in the byline unlike certain other famous musicians (paging, Jimmy Page, Keith Emerson...)

  19. #44
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    'Undercover...' has been played by the band on occasions. I prefer the Bob And Earl 'Harlem Shuffle', I'm afraid. I think 'One Hit...' was played very rarely and footage exists of one- it's a bit of a trainwreck!

    I like 1989's Steel Wheels much more. They played 'Mixed Emotions' at that Desert Trip thing a few years ago. IMHO that was their last great single. The Voodoo Lounge ones are alright, nothing earth-shattering, but stuff like 'Anybody Seen My Baby' and 'Streets Of Love', bleurgh.

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    'Undercover...' has been played by the band on occasions. I prefer the Bob And Earl 'Harlem Shuffle', I'm afraid. I think 'One Hit...' was played very rarely and footage exists of one- it's a bit of a trainwreck!

    I like 1989's Steel Wheels much more. They played 'Mixed Emotions' at that Desert Trip thing a few years ago. IMHO that was their last great single. The Voodoo Lounge ones are alright, nothing earth-shattering, but stuff like 'Anybody Seen My Baby' and 'Streets Of Love', bleurgh.
    Agreed on Steel Wheels. I think it is the last great LP they made. "Almost Hear You Sigh" is superb! I love Daryl Jones, a great player but I miss Bill Wyman... it felt more complete with him in the band.

  21. #46
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    ^The production is now dated and there's a couple of filler tracks like 'Hearts For Sale' but yes, of the post-Tattoo You albums it is my favourite, especially the second half. 'Almost Hear You Sigh' is indeed lovely, as is 'Slipping Away' (a remake of this one is on the mostly acoustic project Stripped). 'Can't Be Seen' gets played live now and then. I also like 'Continental Drift', a bit of an oddity.

    All three of the studio albums which followed suffer from their length. In the days of Exile... a double record length had to be justified, so there's not much filler on there IMHO, but by the 90s that length was standard on CD so you get various (IMHO) dud tracks.

    The last two 'new' songs they did, 'Doom And Gloom' and 'One More Shot', the latter has lasted much better for me than the former. Neither is great or anything though.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by rich View Post
    Agreed on Steel Wheels. I think it is the last great LP they made. "Almost Hear You Sigh" is superb! I love Daryl Jones, a great player but I miss Bill Wyman... it felt more complete with him in the band.
    Another fan of "Steel Wheels" here. I also just pulled out the "Flashpoint" live album from that tour. It kind of came and went without a lot of publicity, but I have always thought it was a pretty decent live album.

  23. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveSly View Post
    Another fan of "Steel Wheels" here. I also just pulled out the "Flashpoint" live album from that tour. It kind of came and went without a lot of publicity, but I have always thought it was a pretty decent live album.
    I remember the review in Rolling Stone suggesting that, for the so called "Greatest Rock And Roll Band In The World", they sure made some pretty lousy live albums, which I take it the reviewer was rectified finally by Flashpoint.

  24. #49
    Howdy Dave (in MA)'s Avatar
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    interestingjuxtaposition.pngInteresting juxtaposition.

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    I remember the review in Rolling Stone suggesting that, for the so called "Greatest Rock And Roll Band In The World", they sure made some pretty lousy live albums, which I take it the reviewer was rectified finally by Flashpoint.
    All of their official live albums are flawed in some way- Ya Ya's is the best by some distance and has some terrific performances ('Love In Vain') but the overdubs are obvious in places (listen to 'Honky Tonk Women').

    Love You Live is nothing special apart from the El Mocambo tracks on the 3rd side- again, too much post-production and it was a transitional period (Ron Wood's early days in the band). I like what's on Still Live but it's very short. Flashpoint is completely forgettable and IMHO too slick. The acoustic Stripped is good but only partially live, they did a fair bit of that in the studio. No Security is surprisingly enjoyable but 'only songs we've never released on a live album' is inevitably a 'fans only' thing...a 2-cd from this tour would actually have been one of their better live albums IMHO.

    The situation has improved with the release of archive releases such as Ladies And Gentlemen and Live In Texas. Releases which caught them on strong tours.

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