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Thread: Why the music industry is killing the music..

  1. #1

    Why the music industry is killing the music..

    Might be better served in OT forum..Interesting article nonetheless.. https://ir.citi.com/QnhL09FARMDbvMhn...An10iZxCkYc%3D

  2. #2
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    I'm sure they're dead on, seeing as how Jim Suva, Certified Public Accountant and Citigroup U.S. IT Hardware & EMS/Telecom &
    Networking Equipment Analyst is involved. He's the modern day George Martin.

    I reckon no one who wasn't involved in writing this has read anywhere near the whole thing. I sure wasn't about to!
    "Of course you are allowed to trumpet your profound ignorance by disagreeing with me." -- Facelift

  3. #3
    Member Paulrus's Avatar
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    Interesting. I didn't read the whole thing either, but if their exec summary is essentially "artists need to leverage technology to expand their audience" it's sort of a "no duh" conclusion. However, we have seen examples of what they're talking about in the prog world. KC has gone independent with a robust website and DGM online store for some time now, and Steven Wilson has bowed to the reality that streaming has replaced radio as the premier distribution channel.

    It's also heartening to read that artists' share of revenues is on the rise, although it's still a pittance compared to what it once was.
    I'm holding out for the Wilson-mixed 5.1 super-duper walletbuster special anniversary extra adjectives edition.

  4. #4
    Outraged bystander markwoll's Avatar
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    This document, with out a doubt, is a must read if you want an idea of how the system works.
    A couple of months ago I asked a question about rights attached to songs on youtube.
    The general answer was "it's complicated".
    That is quite possibly one of the biggest understatements, ever.
    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it."
    -- Aristotle
    Nostalgia, you know, ain't what it used to be. Furthermore, they tells me, it never was.
    Mayonnaise on a hamburger is an Abomination.

  5. #5
    For whatever reason, the link in the OP isn't working for me. Can someone help point me to the article? Thanks!

    Bill

  6. #6
    For me it just worked, but you could also try to copy/paste it into a new tab or window

  7. #7
    Outraged bystander markwoll's Avatar
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    It is a pdf not a web page. On my firefox browser it asked if I wanted to open or save.
    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it."
    -- Aristotle
    Nostalgia, you know, ain't what it used to be. Furthermore, they tells me, it never was.
    Mayonnaise on a hamburger is an Abomination.

  8. #8
    I'm here for the moosic NogbadTheBad's Avatar
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    Ok time for some reading
    Ian

    I blame Wynton, what was the question?
    There are only 10 types of people in the World, those who understand binary and those that don't.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by markwoll View Post
    It is a pdf not a web page. On my firefox browser it asked if I wanted to open or save.
    Ah, got it! It went into my download folder. Many thanks, will read this with interest!

    Bill

  10. #10
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NogbadTheBad View Post
    Ok time for some reading
    Unless I have insomnia (this book seems a sure remedy), I'll pass.

    But I've no doubt this kind of book is a solid-proven artisticide.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from heroin-addicts to crazy ones

  11. #11
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    Isn’t it just an article by some people at Citigroup?

  12. #12
    Member Paulrus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    Isn’t it just an article by some people at Citigroup?
    Not so much an article as an analyst report.
    I'm holding out for the Wilson-mixed 5.1 super-duper walletbuster special anniversary extra adjectives edition.

  13. #13
    Outraged bystander markwoll's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paulrus View Post
    Not so much an article as an analyst report.
    Yes, it explains , to someone who might want to invest ( perhaps ), how the music/money ecosystem works.
    The paper ignores 'small dollar' artists and labels and starts off with the income generators.
    It does explain how the streaming business derives and distributes money ( along with more established business models ).
    The invited analysts at the end weigh in on the future and how individual artists ( content generators, perhaps ), and the industry might evolve revenue wise.
    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it."
    -- Aristotle
    Nostalgia, you know, ain't what it used to be. Furthermore, they tells me, it never was.
    Mayonnaise on a hamburger is an Abomination.

  14. #14
    Progga mogrooves's Avatar
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    https://www.rollingstone.com/music/m...-sales-706746/

    A documentary on the Eagles (now on Netflix & Amazon) makes clear that the contract the Eagles signed with David Geffen’s Asylum Records allowed Geffen to take all of the recording revenues.

    Geffen made so much money off of the Eagles that he gave Jackson Browne a percentage of his own recording revenues as a gratuity for bringing the Eagles into the Geffen stable. Jackson confesses he understood why Don Henley, Glenn Frey and Don Felder were pissed off about that arrangement. Henley and Frey were later sued by Geffen for performing their own songs…
    Michael: "Harold, don't you have any other music, you know, from [last] century?"
    Harold: "There is no other music....."

  15. #15
    It's because of money guys However, there are still some styles which are following the main principle of music - passion. Something like https://musiety.com/groups/country-rock/ country and rock. Maybe Jazz as well. The rest are business units

  16. #16
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    Who was the guy who used to be a member here (or maybe still is) who worked in the music industry (for a major label) and got all bent out of shape when people criticized the industry here?
    "Of course you are allowed to trumpet your profound ignorance by disagreeing with me." -- Facelift

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by mogrooves View Post
    https://www.rollingstone.com/music/m...-sales-706746/

    A documentary on the Eagles (now on Netflix & Amazon) makes clear that the contract the Eagles signed with David Geffen’s Asylum Records allowed Geffen to take all of the recording revenues.

    Geffen made so much money off of the Eagles that he gave Jackson Browne a percentage of his own recording revenues as a gratuity for bringing the Eagles into the Geffen stable. Jackson confesses he understood why Don Henley, Glenn Frey and Don Felder were pissed off about that arrangement. Henley and Frey were later sued by Geffen for performing their own songs…

  18. #18
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    G'Afternoon -

    I'm in the middle of reading this and had to chuckle, early on, when one of the charts 'started' with the year 1984. Look at the chart pointer prior to that year. Maybe 1984 was when such information was first gathered and kept? Anyway.... hahaahaha reminds me that 1984 is 'getting' to be a looooong time ago!

    Carry On
    Chris Buckley

  19. #19
    We're past the era of talent equaling success. There will never be another Zeppelin, or U2, or Beatles, or Metallica. That said, musicians will continue to create music. They did before the RIAA and label contracts, and they'll continue after.

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    Who was the guy who used to be a member here (or maybe still is) who worked in the music industry (for a major label) and got all bent out of shape when people criticized the industry here?
    Ray Shulman?
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

  21. #21
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    No, he was just some guy in Marketing for some big label.
    "Of course you are allowed to trumpet your profound ignorance by disagreeing with me." -- Facelift

  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by IncogNeato View Post
    We're past the era of talent equaling success. There will never be another Zeppelin, or U2, or Beatles, or Metallica. That said, musicians will continue to create music. They did before the RIAA and label contracts, and they'll continue after.
    Somehow this notion that musicians will continue to create music regardless ..... is a good thing. Well, what that really means is that the internet
    has allowed amateurs to take over and flood the channels with mediocrity (I'm being nice).

    There will not be another Zeppelin or you fill in the blank _______________

    Ease of accessibility and free downloads did nothing for the quality of music. The music industry lacks true professionals at all levels. Today, everyone is a musician, producer, composer, lyricist, engineer, promoter, tour manager, social media expert. Just as everyone is now a journalist, including me.
    Last edited by Skullhead; 3 Weeks Ago at 11:51 PM.

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Skullhead View Post
    Well, what that really means is that the internet
    has allowed amateurs to take over and flood the channels with mediocrity (I'm being nice).

    There will not be another Zeppelin or you fill in the blank _______________
    There won't be another Led Zeppelin because they were unique in their time. But there are new bands like Snarky Puppy, who are arguably at least as progressive as Led Zeppelin but with a bit more soul in their playing.

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by happytheman View Post
    Might be better served in OT forum..Interesting article nonetheless.. https://ir.citi.com/QnhL09FARMDbvMhn...An10iZxCkYc%3D
    Thanks. Indispensable reading. If you don't want to read the whole thing, just look at p. 4.

    Henry
    Where Are They Now? Yes news: http://www.bondegezou.co.uk/wh_now.htm
    Blogdegezou, the accompanying blog: http://bondegezou.blogspot.com/

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Skullhead View Post
    Somehow this notion that musicians will continue to create music regardless ..... is a good thing. Well, what that really means is that the internet
    has allowed amateurs to take over and flood the channels with mediocrity (I'm being nice).

    There will not be another Zeppelin or you fill in the blank _______________

    Ease of accessibility and free downloads did nothing for the quality of music. The music industry lacks true professionals at all levels. Today, everyone is a musician, producer, composer, lyricist, engineer, promoter, tour manager, social media expert. Just as everyone is now a journalist, including me.
    That is a valid point. Everyone with a guitar and a PC can release music now.

    That said, it may mean we have to dig a little deeper if we want something new. It may mean that small, indie labels will have to be better at quality control. It may mean that we start to ignore reviews/blogs in favor of what WE think of something. I used to write reviews until, one day, I realized it was a pointless exercise. Who cares what I think? Only me. People are going to listen no matter what I say, and if they don't, that's their problem.

    There won't be another Zeppelin. What I mean by that is, another band THAT big, that created THAT big a legend. One of the reasons they were so big was the way record labels functioned when they were around. It was a perfect storm. There very well may be another band now that just as good, just as vibrant, and just as crushing as Zeppelin was in 1970/1971. It's just going to be harder to find them because they won't have a label like Atlantic making sure you hear them.

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