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Thread: Why the music industry is killing the music..

  1. #301
    Quote Originally Posted by Buddhabreath View Post
    Fair enough. I guess the medium in and of itself does not limit the potential for education, empathy and so on. I guess in my limited experience those types of games to not seem to predominate.
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  2. #302
    Orange Tick Squasher Buddhabreath's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve983 View Post
    Yep, the pop charts have always been shite!
    I'm not so sure, the 1930 pop chart ain't so bad...


    I guess you forgot about McKinney's Cotton Pickers!
    The combined fortunes of the world's 26 richest individuals reached $1.4 trillion last year — the same amount as the total wealth of the 3.8 billion poorest people.

  3. #303
    Orange Tick Squasher Buddhabreath's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bondegezou View Post
    Thanks. I rest my case.
    The combined fortunes of the world's 26 richest individuals reached $1.4 trillion last year — the same amount as the total wealth of the 3.8 billion poorest people.

  4. #304
    Mod or rocker? Mocker. Frumious B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bondegezou View Post
    ^ OK, here's the best-selling single in the UK the year after:



    And the year after:



    Henry
    That Mud song sounds very much like a T. Rex knockoff to me, but both songs still sound WAYYYYYYY better to me than the Pitbull song.

  5. #305
    Member Jay.Dee's Avatar
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    Playing music is very much like tortilla making...


  6. #306
    Jazzbo manqué Mister Triscuits's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay.Dee View Post
    Playing music is very much like tortilla making...
    Sometimes exactly like it.


  7. #307
    As someone who has played video games since the first Atari console came out when I was 12, I still enjoy them. In many cases, much more than movies. No video game is as good as a good book though, IMO. However, modern games can have so much more. I love the Assassins Creed franchise of games, because they incorporate so much history into the games, and you get to run around in historical environments. I've learned more about Ancient Greece and Ancient Egypt from those games than I ever did in High School or college. Granted, if you want to skip the history lesson parts, you can, so I suppose players just interested in the action can more or less ignore and gloss over that stuff, but it's there. Also, music in video games has come quite a long way and a lot of it I find quite excellent. So for my money, I'd rather play a game than watch TV or go to a movie. Reading books though, still takes presidence over all those things though, other than music.

  8. #308
    Also, from my teens to my late 20's, music of the 60's and 70's was my main interest, and I did not enjoy most of the music from those decades (80's, 90's) until more recently. So in my case, what was most new and hip was not of interest to me at all and I listen and buy far more current music now than I did back then (even if a good deal of it sounds more like stuff from the 70's anyway).

  9. #309
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    It's interesting and sometimes very puzzling how different video games are now from when we were younger. Back in the day, I would have gladly skipped any cut scene, as they were only there to give you something to look at as the next diskette loaded. Now it's something players would never skip. I also don't at all understand how important customizing the look of your character is now, and how they have different victory dances and stuff. Either of my kids will be playing a game and spending a ton of time doing shit before the game even starts, and I'm like WTF? Just shoot the goddamned asteroids!

  10. #310
    Member Garyhead's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    and I'm like WTF? Just shoot the goddamned asteroids!

    ....And GIT OFF MY LAWN!
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  11. #311
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garyhead View Post
    ....And GIT OFF MY LAWN!
    That's exactly what I was thinking!

  12. #312
    My observation on 2018 releases being a bit thin is based on going through the entire thread of "Best of 2018" and realizing that, short of Spocks beards new release, there was little I saw that I either recognized or found interesting, especially when pursuing the more highly praised releases on the list. - It is purely just my view, but I just do not see artists I normally follow putting anything out. There is still plenty of backfill, so I still buy older material. But NEW, just didn't happen for me. usually, the best of lists have a plethora of potential purchases. This year there were none. Just my anecdotal observation.

    I spent a fair amount if time researching that list and it was almost entirely stuff I would not be interested in. I still consider myself a prog fan, but some of the stuff listed on that thread was well outside of my realm. Nothing judgmental here, but challenging that opinion is not going to suddenly make me go out and buy stuff I wont listen to.
    Last edited by Yodelgoat; 01-12-2019 at 01:21 PM.
    I got nothin'

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  13. #313
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    Fairly often people here (and elsewhere) people have blamed younger people for not buying music instead of using a streaming service. This is a change from when people were criticized for using torrent sites, etc. (and it’s a pretty different situation now). But I’ve been thinking that the fault lies more with the retail music industry than ever before. Here are some reasons why. I’m mentally using my college-age son as an example. He’s a big music fan and listens mostly on Spotify; actually only on Spotify I think.

    1) Where we live (about 20 minutes outside of NYC - but I include NYC too) there are almost no music stores left.
    2) Lots of people in this age group don’t have credit cards or PayPal accounts, so Amazon and mail-order are problematic.
    3) The technology to rip CDs or download purchased music files is something many people aren’t familiar or comfortable with.
    4) Even if they could easily buy CDs, CD players are getting harder to obtain, and receivers and audio speakers are old old technology or niche technology.

    When I was a kid there were three record stores within walking distance from where I lived, and a couple of audio stores too. The world our children are growing up in doesn’t really allow for buying music easily, as it did for us. Also, many of us have seen that amassing a large physical music collection (or books, or knick-knacks or whatever) can become a burden later in life when you have to pack it all up to move house, etc. I try to make my son aware of this. Instead of buying the physical Criterion releases he’d like, we have a subscription to the Criterion channel.

    Anyway, that’s what I’ve been thinking today.

  14. #314
    Moderator Poisoned Youth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    Anyway, that’s what I’ve been thinking today.
    I think when you compare when you were kid to your son, it's not apples to apples. Access to music was very different back then. Additionally, while I can't speak for your son, just about every kid I know from 16-25 is very savvy when it comes to how to pay for things on the internet. They have iTunes cards and use Venmo, Apple Pay and other more current methods. So while they may not be a wealthy demographic, they are not restricted as you suggest. I also disagree they aren't savvy with technology - maybe not OLD tech, but new tech.

    Younger people will pay for subscription services, and they used to download tracks from iTunes (etc.), but they are growing up in a world where paying for music the old way doesn't make sense to them. There are many players to blame including the record industry. It's a different world now.
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  15. #315
    Member Top Cat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisoned Youth View Post
    I think when you compare when you were kid to your son, it's not apples to apples. Access to music was very different back then. Additionally, while I can't speak for your son, just about every kid I know from 16-25 is very savvy when it comes to how to pay for things on the internet. They have iTunes cards and use Venmo, Apple Pay and other more current methods. So while they may not be a wealthy demographic, they are not restricted as you suggest. I also disagree they aren't savvy with technology - maybe not OLD tech, but new tech.

    Younger people will pay for subscription services, and they used to download tracks from iTunes (etc.), but they are growing up in a world where paying for music the old way doesn't make sense to them. There are many players to blame including the record industry. It's a different world now.
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ yes to all of the above.
    I do believe sometime in the future, may be decades, a new generation will discover music listening their ancestors used and there will be a rediscovery of the physical medium whatever that may be.
    If you had told me 25-30 years ago vinyl would make a comeback, I'd say you were crazy. Now I'm buying $30 albums on 180g vinyl..go figure.
    If you'd told me cds would lose popularity and stores would no longer carry them, I'd say you were cwazy.

    I have a mint Tascam 246 4 track porta studio I'm holding on to and I might even take it with me to the crematorium..lol
    I remember selling my Moog Model D Minimoog for $500 decades ago, never do that again.
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  16. #316
    Quote Originally Posted by Top Cat View Post
    I do believe sometime in the future, may be decades, a new generation will discover music listening their ancestors used and there will be a rediscovery of the physical medium whatever that may be.
    No chance.

    If you had told me 25-30 years ago vinyl would make a comeback, I'd say you were crazy. Now I'm buying $30 albums on 180g vinyl..go figure.
    But this is just a fad.

    Number of vinyl LPs sold in the U.S.

    1977... 340 million "peak vinyl"
    1981... 300 million
    1985... 170 million
    1989... 35 million
    1993... 1 million
    1997... 3 million
    2001... 2 million
    2005... 1 million
    2009... 3 million
    2013... 9 million
    2018... 17 million
    2022... 2 million fad ends

  17. #317
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisoned Youth View Post
    I think when you compare when you were kid to your son, it's not apples to apples. Access to music was very different back then. Additionally, while I can't speak for your son, just about every kid I know from 16-25 is very savvy when it comes to how to pay for things on the internet. They have iTunes cards and use Venmo, Apple Pay and other more current methods. So while they may not be a wealthy demographic, they are not restricted as you suggest. I also disagree they aren't savvy with technology - maybe not OLD tech, but new tech.

    Younger people will pay for subscription services, and they used to download tracks from iTunes (etc.), but they are growing up in a world where paying for music the old way doesn't make sense to them. There are many players to blame including the record industry. It's a different world now.
    Most of what you say is in agreement with what I said. But I don't know of any online retailers that accept Venmo for payment. My son actually doesn't buy anything online. My family shares streaming services like Spotify, Netflix, HBO, etc. but I pay for those. And I know he's never ripped a CD or used iTunes, and almost never even played a CD. BTW, I forgot to mention YouTube, which is also a factor. If something's not on Spotify, he'd probably try YouTube next.

    As you say, the main thing is it's a different world now. When we were kids (well, when I was a kid), audio video entertainment was limited to records, cassettes, radio, and 12 channels ov TV (later to be upped to 30 channels). So you had to be a bit more ambitious and do things like buy a stereo or listen to your clock-radio.

  18. #318
    Member Top Cat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yamishogun View Post
    No chance.



    But this is just a fad.

    Number of vinyl LPs sold in the U.S.

    1977... 340 million "peak vinyl"
    1981... 300 million
    1985... 170 million
    1989... 35 million
    1993... 1 million
    1997... 3 million
    2001... 2 million
    2005... 1 million
    2009... 3 million
    2013... 9 million
    2018... 17 million
    2022... 2 million fad ends
    Trust me on this...everything runs in cycles.
    Your grandkids will grow up and live in small 3 bedroom houses, drive a stationwagon with woodpanel siding, they will wear suits and ties and dresses to dinner where they actually sit and talk to one another instead of texting on some flat little screen. They will pass the mashed potatoes and meatloaf and say thank you and no m'am or sir and after dinner everyone will sit and listen to the television.
    Their names will be Ozzy and Harriet and their kids Beaver and Wally love to collect 78rpm records which now retail at $75 a piece.
    Soundcloud page: Open Window, musical meanderings https://soundcloud.com/precipice

  19. #319
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    The next format may be just around the corner. Implantable sound chips? 3-d VR? DNA-encoded edibles? Who knows.

    LPs and CDs and 8-tracks and cassettes and reels are and will always remain legacy systems -- attractive to a small contingent of retro-hipsters, but anachronistic.

  20. #320
    Quote Originally Posted by Top Cat View Post
    Your grandkids will grow up and live in small 3 bedroom houses, drive a stationwagon with woodpanel siding, they will wear suits and ties and dresses to dinner where they actually sit and talk to one another instead of texting on some flat little screen. They will pass the mashed potatoes and meatloaf and say thank you and no m'am or sir and after dinner everyone will sit and listen to the television.
    Their names will be Ozzy and Harriet and their kids Beaver and Wally love to collect 78rpm records which now retail at $75 a piece.
    This is somewhat realistic but Ozzie and Harriet will not be using plastic/metal objects to listen to music in 2099. There will be an aura of music that one can tap into anytime and get paid to listen to musicians who vie for their attention.

  21. #321
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yamishogun View Post
    No chance.



    But this is just a fad.

    Number of vinyl LPs sold in the U.S.

    1977... 340 million "peak vinyl"
    1981... 300 million
    1985... 170 million
    1989... 35 million
    1993... 1 million
    1997... 3 million
    2001... 2 million
    2005... 1 million
    2009... 3 million
    2013... 9 million
    2018... 17 million
    2022... 2 million fad ends
    We've been hearing for years that vinyl is just a fad. (Mostly from those who don't like it.) However, vinyl sales continue to climb.

    At what point do you cease to be a prophet and just turn in to Chicken Little?

  22. #322
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    At the point at which vinyl becomes more than just a fad?


  23. #323
    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu View Post
    We've been hearing for years that vinyl is just a fad. (Mostly from those who don't like it.) However, vinyl sales continue to climb.

    At what point do you cease to be a prophet and just turn in to Chicken Little?
    I don't have a problem with vinyl, although people aren't buying records because they sound better or take up less space. Some of the reason is that vinyl is something big that you can show to friends and (wrongly) signals that you know more about music than those who don't have vinyl. It's also nice to have the cover artwork.

    17 million bought LPs last year, which is half of the number sold in 1989 when the U.S. population was a third smaller. 17 million is also only 15% of those sold at the peak in the late 70s.

  24. #324
    Member Phlakaton's Avatar
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    I'm finding more and more that most laptops dont even come with a CD player at all now. My work one caught me out when I brought some CDs to burn the first day I started working here - and I couldnt believe I saw no drive. Booooo!

  25. #325
    Quote Originally Posted by yamishogun View Post
    17 million bought LPs last year, which is half of the number sold in 1989 when the U.S. population was a third smaller. 17 million is also only 15% of those sold at the peak in the late 70s.
    Physical media purchases of all formats has declined from what it was in 1989.

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