Thread: Movies - Take Two. Action!

  1. #1701
    Quote Originally Posted by Staun View Post
    Sellers? Murder By Death.
    Peter Sellers wasn't in Murder By Death.

    Oh, and my favorite Robin Hood is the Disney version, with the anthropomorphic animals playing the characters.

    Then there's the Star Trek: TNG episode where Q zaps the entire bridge crew into Sherwood forest. "I protest, Captain! I am not a merry man!".

  2. #1702
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Peter Sellers wasn't in Murder By Death.
    Wait, what?

    Yes he was; didn't he play the "Charlie Chan" parody character?


    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Oh, and my favorite Robin Hood is the Disney version, with the anthropomorphic animals playing the characters.
    That's my favorite Robin Hood too!

  3. #1703
    re: Peter Sellers in Murder By Death

    Quote Originally Posted by aith01 View Post
    Wait, what?

    Yes he was; didn't he play the "Charlie Chan" parody character?
    (Checking Wikipedia) Well, damn. I stand corrected. Looks like you're correct. Dammit, I somehow never realized that was Peter Sellers. But that was one of the brilliant things about Peter Sellers: he could create these characters that were almost unrecognizable as being all performed by the same actor. Even when you know it's Peter Sellers, the voice, mannerisms, etc would be so different, it might throw you off a bit.


    re: Disney version of Robin Hood

    That's my favorite Robin Hood too!
    I should say that's my favorite feature film version of Robin Hood. I still love the Daffy Duck version, where he's doing that routine with the staff, and first whacks his own beak, then when he does it the second time, Porky Pig (as Friar Tuck) sticks his toothpick against the staff while Daffy's spinning, causing Daffy to fall in the stream. And then through the whole cartoon, he repeatedly and spectacularly fails at robbing the tax collector.

  4. #1704
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    The Disney version wins points for having Roger Miller as Alan A'Dale. I love that he doesn't bother at all with approximating a Brit accent.



    In college, we used to have a movie every Sunday with a $1 admission. It was often old classics, like Lawrence of Arabia, Psycho, etc. But one time their distributor sent Disney's Robin Hood by mistake. So we watched it. It was much better than I expected.
    Last edited by Jerjo; 12-06-2018 at 07:34 AM.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  5. #1705
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    re: Peter Sellers in Murder By Death



    (Checking Wikipedia) Well, damn. I stand corrected. Looks like you're correct. Dammit, I somehow never realized that was Peter Sellers. But that was one of the brilliant things about Peter Sellers: he could create these characters that were almost unrecognizable as being all performed by the same actor. Even when you know it's Peter Sellers, the voice, mannerisms, etc would be so different, it might throw you off a bit.

    ie Clare Quilty/Dr. Zempf in Lolita;
    Group Captain Mandrake/Pres Merkin Muffley/Dr. Strangelove in Strangelove;
    multiple roles in The Mouse That Roared

    I think the very first time I saw Strangelove when I was a kid, I did not realize it was Sellers playing President Merkin Muffley with that slight foppish lisp (much less understand the Kubrickian use of erotic imagery in the name,lol)
    Last edited by DocProgger; 12-06-2018 at 07:58 AM.

  6. #1706
    Member Klonk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Staun View Post
    Sellers? Murder By Death.
    Oh man I make it a point to watch this once a year. One of my favorites and Peter Sellers at his hilarious finest
    "Who would have thought a whale would be so heavy?" - Moe

  7. #1707
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    Peter Sellers wasn't in Murder By Death.

    Oh, and my favorite Robin Hood is the Disney version, with the anthropomorphic animals playing the characters.

    Then there's the Star Trek: TNG episode where Q zaps the entire bridge crew into Sherwood forest. "I protest, Captain! I am not a merry man!".
    That was a great episode of Star Trek TNG. Being around Troy when she is shooting arrows is not a good thing. Just ask Data.
    The older I get, the better I was.

  8. #1708
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klonk View Post
    Oh man I make it a point to watch this once a year. One of my favorites and Peter Sellers at his hilarious finest
    Peter Falk was great as well. It was wild seeing the fog machines as they all were driving to the house.
    The older I get, the better I was.

  9. #1709
    Progdog ThomasKDye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klonk View Post
    Oh man I make it a point to watch this once a year. One of my favorites and Peter Sellers at his hilarious finest
    "Conversation is like television set on honeymoon. UNNECESSARY!"
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  10. #1710
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasKDye View Post
    "Conversation is like television set on honeymoon. UNNECESSARY!"
    "Dad, why do I have to do all the dirty work"?
    "Because your mother not here to do dirty work".
    The older I get, the better I was.

  11. #1711
    Pikachupacabra spellbound's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerjo
    The Disney version wins points for having Roger Miller as Alan A'Dale. I love that he doesn't bother at all with approximating a Brit accent.
    I didn't know, or didn't remember that. I'm a big fan of Miller, the "King Of The Road."

  12. #1712
    Pikachupacabra spellbound's Avatar
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    Last night we watched BlacKkKlansman, based on the experience of Ron Stallworth, a black policeman in an ultraconservative white city. My wife read his book, and so was able to tell which parts were added for dramatic effect, as if undercover detective work isn't dramatic enough. But no complaints about how the story was put together for film. Spike Lee is a master director, and in telling Stallworth's story, he made an excellent movie about racism, with connections to the present day.

  13. #1713
    Member nosebone's Avatar
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    Searching (2018) on Amazon video

    Very impressive mystery/thriller about a father searching for his missing daughter via computer tech.
    no tunes, no dynamics, no nosebone

  14. #1714
    Quote Originally Posted by DocProgger View Post
    ie Clare Quilty/Dr. Zempf in Lolita;
    Group Captain Mandrake/Pres Merkin Muffley/Dr. Strangelove in Strangelove;
    multiple roles in The Mouse That Roared

    I think the very first time I saw Strangelove when I was a kid, I did not realize it was Sellers playing President Merkin Muffley with that slight foppish lisp (much less understand the Kubrickian use of erotic imagery in the name,lol)
    Yeah, he supposedly felt that there was "no real Peter Sellers", saying as much numerous times throughout his life. When he appeared on The Muppet Show, he refused to do it as "Peter Sellers", he appeared on the show as a series of characters, even during the backstage bits. Supposedly, when he was working on movies, whenever there was a break or when they were filming scenes he wasn't in, he'd be off in a corner working on some character he was inventing, working on different accents, different ways of walking, etc. And he would lapse in and out of these characters at will.

    Like I was saying, even in something like The Mouse That Roared, where that's very obviously him playing the regal Queen, the dastardly Prime Minister and the incompetent leader of the Grand Duchy Of Fenwick's armed forces, you totally buy into the idea these are three different people. You plays each one so differently and perfectly.

    The thing I find slightly embarrassing about The Mouse That Roared is, for years, I never realized that it was William Hartnell playing Tully Vascomb's second-in-command. I probably saw that movie at least three or four times before I realized The First Doctor was in it.
    That was a great episode of Star Trek TNG. Being around Troy when she is shooting arrows is not a good thing. Just ask Data.
    That was a fun episode, but I recall reading that, for whatever reason, they decided they couldn't let Troy, Dr. Crusher or Vash (the hot archeologist that Q inserts into the role of Maid Marion) do any actual fighting, even though all three of the actresses had some ability with fencing. Then again, maybe it's a good thing they didn't let them fence. I think it would be hot to see Crusher or Troy go all Errol Flynn on the bad guys in that one (or at least go all Sulu on them, as per the Naked Time episode of the original series, which George Takei said was his favorite episode of the original series because he as a big Errol Flynn fan growing up).
    Peter Falk was great as well.
    I love the bit when they're at the dinner table, and Truman Capote somehow switches from one end of the table to the other in a matter of seconds, when the lights go out. And he says, "Actually, it was done with mirrors, I'm really still at the other end of the table", and Peter Falk whips out the gun and threatens to shoot, and Capote's like, "No, don't! It doesn't always work!". Also, Capote losing his patience with Sellers' mock broken English, "SAY YOUR DAMN PROPOSITIONS!"

    Peter Falk essentially played exact same character in another movie called The Cheap Detective, which played like a mashup of Casablanca, The Maltese Falcon, and a couple other noir type pictures. Everyone who gets killed is left standing upright or sitting, they don't collapse on the ground or whatever. At one point, when about the fourth body is found, Falk says, "Doesn't anyone die normal around here?!". There was also a gag in there about a Gestapo guy who got assigned to their Toledo, Ohio office or something like that.

    And yeah, Roger Miller was great as the narrator in the Disney Robin Hood. I actually had a "story book" version of the film on cassette, kind of like a condensed version of the film, accompanied by a picture book, when I was little, so I heard the songs and story a lot when I was a kid.

    Talking about Roger Miller, years late,r he was in an episode of Murder She Wrote, and one of the other guests in that episode Cherie Currie. I always wondered if that was a deliberate casting decision, putting the King Of The Road and our ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb into the same episode.

  15. #1715
    Member Since: 3/27/2002 MYSTERIOUS TRAVELLER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasKDye View Post
    "Conversation is like television set on honeymoon. UNNECESSARY!"
    22 Twain house
    Why is it whenever someone mentions an artist that was clearly progressive (yet not the Symph weenie definition of Prog) do certain people feel compelled to snort "thats not Prog" like a whiny 5th grader?

  16. #1716
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    Sellers was such a...unique character. I think Blake Edwards said something about him being both a genius and the most miserable SOB he'd ever met. From Wiki: Edwards says of the actor's mental state at the time of The Pink Panther Strikes Again, "If you went to an asylum and you described the first inmate you saw, that's what Peter had become. He was certifiable."

    Britt Eklund, who was married to Sellers, said "He may have been a brilliant actor, but as a human being he had no saving graces at all".
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  17. #1717
    Worthy of Laudation thedunno's Avatar
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    I just saw 'burning' in my local arthouse cinema. Surely one of the better movies I've seen in a while.

    Directed by Korean Lee Chong-Dang and losely based on a short story by Haruki Murakami. It is very slow paced but manages to hold the attention for the full two and a half hours. A kind of thriller that still leaves a lot of questions unanswered at the end. I consider this a big advantage.

    There is one already on 'classic' scene in the movie. A stoned girl dancing on the music of Miles Davis close to the South/North korean border. Pure poetry. Hard to be unaffected watching this.

    This is probably miles away from the standard hollywood flick and will not be everyones cuppa. I still advise you to try this one out.

  18. #1718
    Member nosebone's Avatar
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    Eighth Grade (2018)

    Very awkward social media addicted teen in her last week of eighth grade.

    Well done but be prepared to cringe for 90 minutes.
    no tunes, no dynamics, no nosebone

  19. #1719
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    Man of the West Another Anthony Mann western staring Gary Cooper, Eli Cobb, Julie London, and others about an outlaw who left his gang, but years later finds himself amongst them again. Another good Mann western.


    Lurking Fear H P Lovecraft movie made by Full Moon productions, so it's low budget, badly directed and acted although some of the actors have starred in better horror movies. Bad movie.


    The Last Picture Show Seen it many times and enjoy it each time. Several actors in younger roles about growing up in a small Texas town with no future.

  20. #1720
    I recently caught the second half of a film on TCM called Executive Action which I had surprisingly never seen or was even aware of. It's a very realistic look at how the JFK assassination could have occurred if the conspiracy theories were true, long before Stone's JFK. Came out in 1973 and has big time star power like Burt Lancaster and Robert Ryan. It intrigued me enough that I will get the DVD. I have seen a lot of JFK shooting material, documentaries etc and I can't believe I somehow missed this one.

  21. #1721
    Watched The Equalizer 2 . Not as good as the first . It lacks the pacing and focus of the first , meandering into a bunch of sub plots , not all rewarding. The villain(s) aren't as good. I was just above the bored level and made it through the flic , but unimpressed.

  22. #1722
    Quote Originally Posted by DocProgger View Post
    I recently caught the second half of a film on TCM called Executive Action which I had surprisingly never seen or was even aware of. It's a very realistic look at how the JFK assassination could have occurred if the conspiracy theories were true, long before Stone's JFK. Came out in 1973 and has big time star power like Burt Lancaster and Robert Ryan. It intrigued me enough that I will get the DVD. I have seen a lot of JFK shooting material, documentaries etc and I can't believe I somehow missed this one.
    You remind me of the episode of Quantum Leap where Sam leaps into Oswald's body, and attempts to stop the assassination (unsuccessfully, though apparently he does save Jackie's life, according to Al, she originally died as well). There was an article in TV Guide about it at the time, and I remember the show's producer, Donald Bellisario was asked why he did a JFK episode, and his response was something to the effect of "Oliver Stone is crazy, Oswald acted alone".

  23. #1723
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    You remind me of the episode of Quantum Leap where Sam leaps into Oswald's body, and attempts to stop the assassination (unsuccessfully, though apparently he does save Jackie's life, according to Al, she originally died as well). There was an article in TV Guide about it at the time, and I remember the show's producer, Donald Bellisario was asked why he did a JFK episode, and his response was something to the effect of "Oliver Stone is crazy, Oswald acted alone".
    Yeah cuz Oliver Stone made up all those conspiracy theories and uncovered all the conflicting evidence himself and wrote the dozens of books on the subject himself. He was a filmmaker who was theatrically presenting the various alternatives to the lone gunman theory using the actual true story of the Prosecutor Garrison story. I'm surprised any TV producer would be so thick headed to not understand what a film director was doing with that film. This Executive Action film presents a very plausible scenario based on what was known circa 1973, long before that "crazy" Oliver Stone did it. I guess whoever directed that film was "crazy" too.
    Last edited by DocProgger; 12-17-2018 at 12:04 AM.

  24. #1724
    Quote Originally Posted by DocProgger View Post
    I'm surprised any TV producer would be so thick headed to not understand what a film director was doing with that film. This Executive Action film presents a very plausible scenario based on what was known circa 1973, long before that "crazy" Oliver Stone did it. I guess whoever directed that film was "crazy" too.
    Well, I suppose that depends on your definition of crazy. In the first place, there's also a lot of evidence that overturns a lot of the alleged evidence regarded the JFK conspiracy. For instance, one theory has it that there was no way Oswald could have fired the number of shots that were fired in whatever the space of time was, something like 20 seconds or whatever. Well, on this program, they demonstrated that it was absolutely possible to do it in the time frame in question, by having someone do it (and the guy that did it wasn't a Marine, as Oswald had been).

    Another thing was supposedly, there had to be a second shooter because of the way the JFK's head is thrown when one of the bullets hit him, it would have been "impossible" for the shot to have come from the book depository building. Yet, this show presented the science to explain how the kill shot, I guess it was, could have absolutely fired from Oswald's trajectory.

    You ever see the episode of King Of The Hill, where Dale realizes he has the Lincoln going in the wrong direction on his diorama? When he turns the car around, he suddenly realizes everything in the Warren Report could actually be true, and it causes him to have a nervous breakdown.

    As for conspiracies, this show demonstrated how conspiracies typically fall apart due to the fact, eventually someone talks. It's been what? 55 years? Don't you think if there was a conspiracy behind the JFK assassination, we'd have more than just theories and vague insinuations?

    And about Bellisario, he's created at least three long running, high rated TV shows (one of which has been on the air for more than 10 years now), so I'm not sure how thick headed he is. Also, before he went into television, he was a Marine, and guess who he served with! Yes, that's right, he at least to a certain extent, knew Lee Harvey Oswald, and I think his point of view was, that Oswald was completely crackers and was unlikely to have been involved in any conspiracy.

    While your point that Stone wasn't the first to put forth conspiracy theories about the JFK assassination, he put a target on his back by making that movie, so at the time, a lot of people who didn't buy into the theories were taking shots at him. And in fact, there were still people taking shots at Stone more than a decade later, because of that. Fortunately, he had a sense of humor about it, as demonstrated by his cameo in the movie Dave (where he's shown telling Larry King that he believes that the President has been replaced by a doppelganger, which in fact, he had been, but that's another story).

    Oh, and while maybe not everyone who buys into the conspiracy theories are "crazy", some of them most definitely are. This one guy I saw on this TV show seemed to be convinced that every President since JFK, as soon as he's been elected, is taken to a room by "the men who really run the country", and shown a film, shot from the grassy knoll, apparently demonstrating that they were the ones who had JFK bumped off because he didn't follow their agenda. Read any Orwell lately?

  25. #1725
    Member since 7/13/2000 Hal...'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DocProgger View Post
    Yeah cuz Oliver Stone made up all those conspiracy theories and uncovered all the conflicting evidence himself and wrote the dozens of books on the subject himself. He was a filmmaker who was theatrically presenting the various alternatives to the lone gunman theory using the actual true story of the Prosecutor Garrison story. I'm surprised any TV producer would be so thick headed to not understand what a film director was doing with that film. This Executive Action film presents a very plausible scenario based on what was known circa 1973, long before that "crazy" Oliver Stone did it. I guess whoever directed that film was "crazy" too.
    I know this isn't the forum for this, but you guys reminded me of something I read in David Talbot's book, Brothers: The Hidden History of the Kennedy Years: that some of the Secret Service agents looked over to the grassy knoll during the shooting of JFK.
    This conversation can serve no purpose anymore. Goodbye.

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