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Thread: The Vinyl Thread

  1. #201
    Member Staun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alucard View Post
    Same for me I would never buy a record that I don't want to listen to. And I am going more and more for mint or near mint. Yesterday I found a copy of Kate Bush Never Forever , the cover was VG but the record had some flaws and I put it back. I am quite sure I will find a better copy soon.
    In the evening I went to a concert and found two new records:
    the Work : compilation ( Jelodanti records 2018) good compilation , strange cover with a sandpaper like texture. You have to keep it in the plastic
    Uz Isme Doma : Pohádky Ze Zapotrebi (1995)
    Did I read somewhere that KB's catalog is being reissued on vinyl?
    The older I get, the better I was.

  2. #202
    Quote Originally Posted by Staun View Post
    Did I read somewhere that KB's catalog is being reissued on vinyl?
    You can find most of her records quite cheap second hand in a very good condition and for nearly nothing. I found a couple of months ago a near mint French pressing of Lionheart. Also I don't like the fish head labels of the reissues especially for Never For Ever which had nice different labels on each side inspired by ge cover artwork.
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  3. #203
    cunning linguist 3LockBox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Today's youth are all about BELONGING, about fitting in, about not standing out.
    You think that was different back in the '60s and '70s? If everyone was motivated by individuality then nothing would have ever been as popular as things were back when. We'd never have heard of the Fabians of this world if it hadn't been fashionable to buy Fabian's 'hit' record.

    You're assuming today's youth are collecting vinyl because of a presumed value or collectability, rather than just buying it to listen to. Sure, they could listen to the same material on any streaming service. I think that millennials like the tangibility of holding an album. And they seem to be fascinated that something so arcane looking is capable of high fidelity (even if they're not exactly playing them on high-end rigs). Same with cassettes. A lot of millennials have never heard even a decent stereo system and when they its probably an older system with legacy playback components and media. And for the most part the retro media is still cheaper used than a new CD (though that gap is closing).

    How would a millennial know about the collectability of a particular pressing if they didn't run in circles where people only value the rareness of such an item? They're probably just buying stuff they want to listen to.

    As far as looking for that rare, collectable gem in a record store, its doubtful that any collector will know more than the store owner, much less a millennial. It's more likely one will find their 'holy grail' in a second hand store like Value Village or Goodwill. Record stores have already raised the prices on most of the "collectables".

    Besides, my millennial daughter doesn't make a lot of money and should spend her hard-earned cash on something she'd want to listen to, rather than something collectable. She's taken me up on most of my suggestions and I find that she, along with her peers, have quite open.minds and eclectic tastes when it comes to music. She loves ELO (without any encouragement) but can follow up an ELO album with Dolly Parton's greatest hits, then follow that with Chuck Mangione's Feels So Good (I don't think peer pressure factored in here).

    And as I've said before, the less convenient legacy media like albums and tapes have encouraged listening to albums as a whole, rather than playlists sculpted by streaming services. Maybe millennials will come up with idea to put a human being on a radio station who plays music on the premise of discovery rather than letting algorithms and focus groups do it.

  4. #204
    Quote Originally Posted by 3LockBox View Post
    You think that was different back in the '60s and '70s? If everyone was motivated by individuality then nothing would have ever been as popular as things were back when. We'd never have heard of the Fabians of this world if it hadn't been fashionable to buy Fabian's 'hit' record.

    You're assuming today's youth are collecting vinyl because of a presumed value or collectability, rather than just buying it to listen to. Sure, they could listen to the same material on any streaming service. I think that millennials like the tangibility of holding an album. And they seem to be fascinated that something so arcane looking is capable of high fidelity (even if they're not exactly playing them on high-end rigs). Same with cassettes. A lot of millennials have never heard even a decent stereo system and when they its probably an older system with legacy playback components and media. And for the most part the retro media is still cheaper used than a new CD (though that gap is closing).

    How would a millennial know about the collectability of a particular pressing if they didn't run in circles where people only value the rareness of such an item? They're probably just buying stuff they want to listen to.

    As far as looking for that rare, collectable gem in a record store, its doubtful that any collector will know more than the store owner, much less a millennial. It's more likely one will find their 'holy grail' in a second hand store like Value Village or Goodwill. Record stores have already raised the prices on most of the "collectables".

    Besides, my millennial daughter doesn't make a lot of money and should spend her hard-earned cash on something she'd want to listen to, rather than something collectable. She's taken me up on most of my suggestions and I find that she, along with her peers, have quite open.minds and eclectic tastes when it comes to music. She loves ELO (without any encouragement) but can follow up an ELO album with Dolly Parton's greatest hits, then follow that with Chuck Mangione's Feels So Good (I don't think peer pressure factored in here).

    And as I've said before, the less convenient legacy media like albums and tapes have encouraged listening to albums as a whole, rather than playlists sculpted by streaming services. Maybe millennials will come up with idea to put a human being on a radio station who plays music on the premise of discovery rather than letting algorithms and focus groups do it.
    Interesting remarks , I feel the genuine interest of younger people for vinyl but I actually never discussed with someone and their fascination and/or motivation to buy vinyl records seem strange to me. Yesterday I was in one of my favourite used record shops and there were two artists doing short showcases and the store was crammed. There was a mother with two young kids and you feel their interest and wish to look and touch the records. Apart from the audio quality (and the comparison with other media) there is something connected with vinyl that is beyond a temporary fashion. I have to discuss next time with some younger people.
    I went to Gernany for the weekend and visited one of my favourite second hand shops in Düsseldorf, Rainking Record Store ( They have a Discogs page)
    One intersting thing is the notion of quality in different countries. I was last year in Tokyo and bought a couple of records and all of the records I saw were in great shape. I got the feeling it would be kind of non ethic to sell something that is not in a good shape.
    The general level of quality in Germany is also quite high.
    I found two near mint records:
    Greenslade: Bedside Manners are Extra , German Brain pressing
    Great cover
    Osibisa : same German MCA pressing, another great Dean cover
    Michael Rother : Flammende Herzen, cover had some light stains but the record was VG+
    I found also Triple Echo 3 LP set by Soft Machine but unfortunately one of the 3 records had a big scratch , the box , more like a folder was not in great shape and it was too expensive.
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  5. #205
    That's Mr. to you, Sir!! Trane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3LockBox View Post
    You think that was different back in the '60s and '70s? If everyone was motivated by individuality then nothing would have ever been as popular as things were back when. We'd never have heard of the Fabians of this world if it hadn't been fashionable to buy Fabian's 'hit' record.

    You're assuming today's youth are collecting vinyl because of a presumed value or collectability, rather than just buying it to listen to. Sure, they could listen to the same material on any streaming service. I think that millennials like the tangibility of holding an album. And they seem to be fascinated that something so arcane looking is capable of high fidelity (even if they're not exactly playing them on high-end rigs). Same with cassettes. A lot of millennials have never heard even a decent stereo system and when they its probably an older system with legacy playback components and media. And for the most part the retro media is still cheaper used than a new CD (though that gap is closing).

    How would a millennial know about the collectability of a particular pressing if they didn't run in circles where people only value the rareness of such an item? They're probably just buying stuff they want to listen to.

    As far as looking for that rare, collectable gem in a record store, its doubtful that any collector will know more than the store owner, much less a millennial. It's more likely one will find their 'holy grail' in a second hand store like Value Village or Goodwill. Record stores have already raised the prices on most of the "collectables".

    Besides, my millennial daughter doesn't make a lot of money and should spend her hard-earned cash on something she'd want to listen to, rather than something collectable. She's taken me up on most of my suggestions and I find that she, along with her peers, have quite open.minds and eclectic tastes when it comes to music. She loves ELO (without any encouragement) but can follow up an ELO album with Dolly Parton's greatest hits, then follow that with Chuck Mangione's Feels So Good (I don't think peer pressure factored in here).

    And as I've said before, the less convenient legacy media like albums and tapes have encouraged listening to albums as a whole, rather than playlists sculpted by streaming services. Maybe millennials will come up with idea to put a human being on a radio station who plays music on the premise of discovery rather than letting algorithms and focus groups do it.

    mmmhhh!!!... Unlike Carlberg, I'm not sure about the hipsters' raving about vinyl is all that profit-driven (and if that was the case, most of them will get screwed heavily as they're buying a lot of dodgy stuff out on the shelves)... It's more about trends and fads.
    It's about owning them and displaying them and bragging about it to their peers (remember that hipster are relatively shallow, they probably buy bigger-format vinyls as a cover to hide the width of their shallowness), but not really about the sonic qualities or debate superiority to a CD (since - asd you say - most of them will not play them on hi-fi chains). They pretty well leave that debate to us old curmudgeons after being shown how little they can add to the debate.
    I still think that a big part of it is a generation thing, and it's more about rejecting their parent's way of listening to music (CD) and prefering their grandparents (vinyls). I'm still quite sure that the spiritual-ritual-religius experience is absolute bullcrap to the huge majority. Same thing with the cassette resurgeance, really.... There, we know it's definitely not about sonics, butmuch more about monkey see, monkey do.

    BTW, I would suspect that most Millenials hipster know fairly well what a hi-fi is, and their parents have (or maybe had) one.

    =====================

    Martin, I would seriously not consider starting the debate with those young hipsters inside a record store (catch up with them outside the store and offer them a coffee somewhere down the road), because most owners would see it as a tentative to ruin their sales: a bit like if there was a vegan activist approaching the butcher's customers about their meat-eating habits inside his store.

    Not at all that I see you as an "Anti-Vinyl-Activist" (I would fit that bill much more than you would ever do, even if I already bought two vinyls this year), though
    Last edited by Trane; 1 Week Ago at 06:45 AM.
    my music collection increased tenfolds when I switched from heroin-addicts to crazy ones

  6. #206
    Hugues,
    when I am talking about kids I am not including hipsters but teenagers , a classic case are nerdie parents who drag their kids into a record shop, but on most cases they look amused , what 3LockBox said they don't have any prejudices against or/for artists , and choise whatever they like , a privilege of kids to be able to create their own taste from scratch. I think the timefrane that is imposed by the vinyl ( one side or both sides limited by approx 20 minutes) can be interesting for kids that try to find a mark in an ocean of available music on the net. I saw a feature about two guys in Hamburg who organize listening sessions for just one vinyl record in movie theatres. In the feature it was Blonde on Blonde by Dylan and even if I found the entry price of 5 Euros a bit expensive I quite like the concept.
    Dieter Moebius : "Art people like things they don’t understand!"

  7. #207
    One way to determine if they are serious about the music or just following trends is how they handle the vinyl.

    By the edges = serious. Greasy fingers on the grooves = well, you know.
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  8. #208
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
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    ^^ Those who improperly handle vinyl will also have fingerprints on the shiny side of their CDs, DVDs, and/or Blu-Rays. One time, a friend of mine lamented his favorite CD would no longer play. I flipped it over, inspected it, then buffed off massive amounts of fingerprints with a microfiber cloth. Voila, good as new. I instructed him on proper disc handling, and left him with a couple of microfiber cloths to buff his other discs.
    Last edited by progmatist; 1 Week Ago at 04:52 PM.
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  9. #209
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3LockBox View Post
    Besides, my millennial daughter doesn't make a lot of money and should spend her hard-earned cash on something she'd want to listen to, rather than something collectable. She's taken me up on most of my suggestions and I find that she, along with her peers, have quite open.minds and eclectic tastes when it comes to music. She loves ELO (without any encouragement) but can follow up an ELO album with Dolly Parton's greatest hits, then follow that with Chuck Mangione's Feels So Good (I don't think peer pressure factored in here).
    One thing I've learned first hand leading a music therapy group: Way more millennials listen to and love our music than my/our peers who listened to my/our parents' music, when we were millennials' age. As part of my job, I participate in the Phoenix First Friday Art Walk every month. You'd be amazed how many millennials I've seen walking around wearing t-shirts from Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, Rush, Styx, etc. You'd be amazed how many millennials have come to me and said "Nice shirt," referring to the Yes, ELP, Kansas, Spock's Beard, Transatlantic, and other shirts I happened to be wearing at the time. Just this past Friday while wearing a Genesis shirt, a millennial asked me whether I preferred Peter Gabriel or Phil Collins Genesis. I responded, "Peter Gabriel of course, before Phil Collins ruined it." He laughed because that wasn't old to him, like it is to us on this forum.
    Last edited by progmatist; 1 Week Ago at 04:47 PM.
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  10. #210
    Jazzbo manqué Mister Triscuits's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    You'd be amazed how many millennials have come to me and said "Nice shirt," referring to the Yes, ELP, Kansas, Spock's Beard, Transatlantic, and other shirts I happened to be wearing at the time.
    Just yesterday I had a teen or twenty-ish girl at the grocery store remark on my Frank Zappa t-shirt.

  11. #211
    cunning linguist 3LockBox's Avatar
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    The jury is still out for my daughter with regards to Genesis, Peter or no Peter.

  12. #212
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronmac View Post
    One way to determine if they are serious about the music or just following trends is how they handle the vinyl.

    By the edges = serious. Greasy fingers on the grooves = well, you know.
    I believe the proper way to handle vinyl is like learning a guitar chord. It takes practice. Can't remember the last time I actually touched the surface of an album.
    The older I get, the better I was.

  13. #213
    Someone sold his Tangerine Dream collection and I opted for Rubycon in near mint shape for the record. The cover is in a good shape but for a removed round sticker which leaves a faded blue round. Quite visible on this great cover art. I wonder if the lamination came off or if its the residual from the sticker . Any advice for cleaning ?
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  14. #214
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    ^ Don't think there's much you can do, and you risk damaging it further if you try to.
    "If you want to see the true nature of humanity, just look at the internet."

    http://www.discogs.com/user/moecurlythanu/collection

  15. #215
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    Quote Originally Posted by alucard View Post
    Someone sold his Tangerine Dream collection and I opted for Rubycon in near mint shape for the record. The cover is in a good shape but for a removed round sticker which leaves a faded blue round. Quite visible on this great cover art. I wonder if the lamination came off or if its the residual from the sticker . Any advice for cleaning ?
    If there's sticker residue, 99% of the time it can be removed with lighter fluid without any damage to the sleeve. If it's varnish or laminate that got peeled off, there's not much you can do.

  16. #216
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    I think he said sticker fade, which is just a discolorization caused by the sticker, but not actual residue. Or did I misunderstand?
    "If you want to see the true nature of humanity, just look at the internet."

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  17. #217
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    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu View Post
    I think he said sticker fade, which is just a discolorization caused by the sticker, but not actual residue. Or did I misunderstand?
    If that's the case, then yeah, not much can be done.

  18. #218
    Jazzbo manqué Mister Triscuits's Avatar
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    Bought an old blues LP last week where a previous owner had for some reason "sealed" it with a strip of inch-wide cellophane tape across the middle of the opening. Working carefully with lighter fluid, Q-tip, and an X-acto knife (to pry up the tape corners), I got the tape itself off only to find that it came off completely clean, leaving 100% of the adhesive still on the sleeve--soft and gooey, too, not dried and hard. Took me the better part of half an hour to get all that muck off the sleeve, but it was worth it--it looks great now.

  19. #219
    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Triscuits View Post
    If that's the case, then yeah, not much can be done.
    I will try on a small portion to see if its just faded or residue from the sticker. Just came home from record store day with a couple of used records. A near mint Corea/ Burton : Crystal Silence ECM German Pressing, a bit of the lamination has peeled of, but that happened to a lot of my German laminated covers. Not too bad so. Klaus Schulze Time wind French pressing cover and record near mint. And yes I never learn, a near mint Weather Report Black Market Dutch Pressing, cover great but the former owner had written his name ERIC with a red permanent marker right on the front cover. There should be a law to punish people who write their names on record covers.
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  20. #220
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    Quote Originally Posted by alucard View Post
    Someone sold his Tangerine Dream collection and I opted for Rubycon in near mint shape for the record. The cover is in a good shape but for a removed round sticker which leaves a faded blue round. Quite visible on this great cover art. I wonder if the lamination came off or if its the residual from the sticker . Any advice for cleaning ?
    In the "olden days", my recommendation would be to go to the Library and ask a Librarian for advice....They used to spend time cleaning stuff off of books / covers to keep them clean. I recall an old interview about this subject....another place would be a picture framing shop....they also had knowledge about cleaning up paper surfaces. Alas....I say "Olden Days" as I believe Libraries just chuck old books now and picture framing shops might hire chain-food employees now.....But, look around your community / YT videos.... I took an old Poster from the 90's to my local craft-shop (Michaels) for framing....met a wonderful woman who cleaned up all the tape spots, thumbtack holes and creases and didn't charge extra for it. YMMV IMHO
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  21. #221
    Member Staun's Avatar
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    I think I have asked this before but still interested. What album have you bought that has had the most inserts? Pics, liner notes, cards, drawings, stickers etc. For me it's still, Live At Leeds. Am I mistaken but wasn't, Living In The Past, packed as well?
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  22. #222
    Jazzbo manqué Mister Triscuits's Avatar
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    Living in the Past just had a bound-in picture booklet.

    Dark Side of the Moon and Sir Pauls' Venus and Mars each came with not one but two posters and two stickers.

  23. #223
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Triscuits View Post
    Living in the Past just had a bound-in picture booklet.

    Dark Side of the Moon and Sir Pauls' Venus and Mars each came with not one but two posters and two stickers.
    Yes, I have the DSOFM posters. I also liked the poster and books that were in Elton Johns, Captain Fantastic. Great album but again, I've never seen as much stuff as there was in LAL. I guess in those days, it was just part of the fun. Oh, I think that's a beautiful cover print that came out of the Marillion, Brave, reissue.
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  24. #224
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    Remember Alice Coopers Schools Out pink panties?
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  25. #225
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    Quote Originally Posted by nosebone View Post
    Remember Alice Coopers Schools Out pink panties?
    I got cheated. My copy back in the day didn't have them, just a plastic inner sleeve. Looks like copies with the panties go for big bucks on eBay nowadays.

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