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Thread: Horror Fiction Help

  1. #51
    Member Lou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by interbellum View Post
    I think Robert Pobi's Bloodman is a great modern horror-story.

    http://www.robertpobi.com/picts/Bloodman.mp4
    That has piqued my interest!
    A Comfort Zone is not a Life Sentence

  2. #52
    Member hippypants's Avatar
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    There's many Landsdale books, but check out The Bottoms, and A Fine Dark Line. Also the dystopian short story, Thirty Stitches on a Dead Man's Back. His brother John writes too, and just came out with a book.

    Robert R. McCammon's Swan Song is good and there's some others by him worth checking into.

  3. #53
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    Any good books that are set in rural England, with some bizarre shit going on?
    If it isn't Krautrock, it's krap.

  4. #54
    Member Lopez's Avatar
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    I thought of another apocalyptic book (actually a novella available in several anthologies), Harlan Ellison's A Boy and His Dog. It's quite an enjoyable story about a young man and his telepathic dog who sniffs out food and women after WWIV. It was made into a black comedy movie in 1975. Ellison didn't like it, but I thought it was fun.
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  5. #55
    Member Lou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by interbellum View Post
    I think Robert Pobi's Bloodman is a great modern horror-story.

    http://www.robertpobi.com/picts/Bloodman.mp4
    Just finished Bloodman, and enjoyed it. Currently on Joe Hills Fireman
    A Comfort Zone is not a Life Sentence

  6. #56
    Quote Originally Posted by Lou View Post
    Just finished Bloodman, and enjoyed it. Currently on Joe Hills Fireman
    I guess you hadn't expected the ending from Bloodman either....

  7. #57
    More or less in the horror-genre are the books I read from Matthew Pearl, like The Dante Club.

    Here's a nice introduction:



    It inspired someone to make this video:


  8. #58
    Member Lou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by interbellum View Post
    I guess you hadn't expected the ending from Bloodman either....
    Nope!
    A Comfort Zone is not a Life Sentence

  9. #59
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    Any good books that are set in rural England, with some bizarre shit going on?
    Try The Midwich Cuckoos by John Wyndham, filmed twice as Village of the Damned.
    "Of course you are allowed to trumpet your profound ignorance by disagreeing with me." -- Facelift

  10. #60
    Studmuffin Scott Bails's Avatar
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    Yves - I'm in the middle of Sea of Rust, by C. Robert Cargill, which tells the tale of a "comfort robot" after the AI apocalypse. The link compares this to The Martian, but I'm not seeing it, so far. But so far a very enjoyable read.
    Music isn't about chops, or even about talent - it's about sound and the way that sound communicates to people. Mike Keneally

  11. #61
    Member moecurlythanu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    Any good books that are set in rural England, with some bizarre shit going on?
    Hound of the Baskervilles.

  12. #62
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moecurlythanu View Post
    Hound of the Baskervilles.
    That's my go-to cozy book. Read it a few times.
    "Of course you are allowed to trumpet your profound ignorance by disagreeing with me." -- Facelift

  13. #63
    Member dropforge's Avatar
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    Jed, I've got a story for you: "Boys Will Be Boys" from Joe Lansdale's collection By Bizarre Hands.

    Get back to me.

  14. #64
    Member Lou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    Yeah, for Lansdale, the utterly surreal "The Drive-In" and its sequel, "The Drive-In 2."
    Just got done with The Drive In. That was truly bizarre! I now have to get the 2 sequels. Thanks for this recommendation!
    A Comfort Zone is not a Life Sentence

  15. #65
    There's another sequel? ! ? ! <rushes to Amazon...>
    Do not bug a wombat, 'cause wombats bug back,
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  16. #66
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post
    Jed, I've got a story for you: "Boys Will Be Boys" from Joe Lansdale's collection By Bizarre Hands.

    Get back to me.
    Thanks to a FB horror book group, I've been finding out that there are people who enjoy REALLY violent and gruesome horror fiction - is this some of that? Not for me! I don't really get that. I'm not into slasher movies (not since the early 80s anyway), so why would I read slasher fiction?
    "Of course you are allowed to trumpet your profound ignorance by disagreeing with me." -- Facelift

  17. #67
    Lansdale's stuff can be pretty wild and violent, but I wouldn't call it slasher-y (despite the name of one antho he co-edited, "Razored Saddles"). He depicts gore and violence pretty clearly, but doesn't exactly dwell on it...I donno, maybe you would like it, maybe you wouldn't. The one story of his that everyone should read, though, is "The Night They Missed the Horror Show."
    Do not bug a wombat, 'cause wombats bug back,
    and no-one can live through a wombat attack.

  18. #68
    Highly Evolved Orangutan JKL2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sturgeon's Lawyer View Post
    Lansdale's stuff can be pretty wild and violent, but I wouldn't call it slasher-y (despite the name of one antho he co-edited, "Razored Saddles"). He depicts gore and violence pretty clearly, but doesn't exactly dwell on it...I donno, maybe you would like it, maybe you wouldn't. The one story of his that everyone should read, though, is "The Night They Missed the Horror Show."
    But is "Boys Will Be Boys" "cozy" or not?
    "Of course you are allowed to trumpet your profound ignorance by disagreeing with me." -- Facelift

  19. #69
    Actually, I've never read it...
    Do not bug a wombat, 'cause wombats bug back,
    and no-one can live through a wombat attack.

  20. #70
    Member dropforge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JKL2000 View Post
    But is "Boys Will Be Boys" "cozy" or not?
    More disturbing than excessively violent.

    Lansdale does delve into violence, though. He's no stranger to it.

    In the '80s, the "splatterpunk" horror subgenre gained popularity, thanks to writers like Lansdale, David J. Schow, Jack Ketcham, John Skipp && Craig Spector, and Poppy Z. Brite and some others. Schow is the guy responsible for the handle.

  21. #71
    Member Lopez's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dropforge View Post
    More disturbing than excessively violent.
    The guy to read for that is Ray Garton, particularly his earlier stuff like the stories "Punishments" and "Sinema" and the novel Crucifax Autumn. In that novel, he focuses on what can happen when parents don't pay attention to what their kids are doing. Ray was also lumped into the splatterpunk category.
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  22. #72
    Member Lopez's Avatar
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    One of the giants in the horror field, Jack Ketchum, shuffled off this mortal coil today from cancer.
    Lou

    Awarded the Krusty Brand Seal of Approval. It's not just good, it's good enough.

  23. #73
    Member Lou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lopez View Post
    One of the giants in the horror field, Jack Ketchum, shuffled off this mortal coil today from cancer.
    Oh Man!!!! He is one of my absolute favorites! R.I.P Jack, and thank you for SO much great material!
    A Comfort Zone is not a Life Sentence

  24. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by Lopez View Post
    One of the giants in the horror field, Jack Ketchum, shuffled off this mortal coil today from cancer.
    Oh man, what a drag! He was a great writer. I hung out with him at a couple conventions some years back. Have a couple of pics of us. RIP Dallas Mayr.

  25. #75
    Member Lopez's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by philsunset View Post
    Oh man, what a drag! He was a great writer. I hung out with him at a couple conventions some years back. Have a couple of pics of us. RIP Dallas Mayr.
    I'd love to see those, Bob.
    Lou

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