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Thread: Classical compositions used in prog, or which might have inspired to a specific track

  1. #1
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    Classical compositions used in prog, or which might have inspired to a specific track

    Ligeti comes to mind

    Zappa: G-spot Tornado (the rythm riff)



    Farmers Market: Slav to the rythm (they write in on the album)



    ELP - debatable if its a specifik track, but to me it immidiately made me think "The Three Fates" or "Trilogy" (middle section).


  2. #2
    King Crimson did a cover of Gustav Holst's Mars.

    https://youtu.be/YAUcmXhWGhc


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    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Lotsa bands have done lotsa classical covers, some even made a career of it (The Nice, ELP, Ekseption/Trace, Electrophon, Tom Parker/Apollo 100, Wendy Carlos, Larry Fast/Synergy, etc. etc. etc.)

    I think Zeuhl was looking for compositions INSPIRED by classical music. In that category I'd put the whole "Puzzle" album by Mandrake Memorial, Kotelbel, and many of the side-long epics of the day, which played as mini-symphonies.

  4. #4
    My favourIte is when a riff from The Rite Of Spring appears in Voivod's Pre-Ignition.
    The song is already mind blowing before it shows up.
    Afterwards....wowee.

  5. #5
    The Move had a few -
    Night of Fear uses a riff taken from Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture.
    Cherry Blossom Clinic Revisited has bits of the Sorcerer's Apprentice by Dukas and Bach's Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring.
    Roy Wood's 'The Song' from his solo album Mustard seems to include a re-vamp of the Bach-Gounod Ave Maria.


    On Frank Black's album Fast Man Raider Man there is a track "The End of the Summer" which is adapted from Gabriel Fauré's Sicilienne, Op. 78, and was arranged by Lyle Workman. Really nice job too.
    Last edited by jake; 03-18-2017 at 12:03 PM.

  6. #6
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    I thought it could be fun if you could find the actual pieces/riffs etc. that has been used.

    Yes, Gustav Holst - The Planets is a contender.

    Most obvious when the artist is covering a composition, like Niacin - Spring Rounds = Stravinsky: Le Sacre (done in 3 minutes), but also when a band makes marvellous use of a riff or lump they 'stole'. Like The Science Groups subtle use of Le Sacre where the rythm is used at half speed on the track 'Scale Invarians' on the album 'A mere Coincidence'.

    Here is another band doing Le Sacre https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wmtuL2H3AqA

  7. #7
    There are many Stravinsky quotes in Zappa's music:

    http://wiki.killuglyradio.com/wiki/Igor_Stravinsky

  8. #8
    After Crying released a recorded inspired by and dedicated to Bartok. Zappa made citations of one of Bartok's piano concerts and Stravinsky s Histoire du Soldat.
    the New Trolls and Jon Lord recorded both baroque inspired records , Concerto Grosso and Sarabande.
    Christian Vander was highly inspired and used some material from Carl Orff , forgot the name .
    'We would Be Building'by John Fahey is a cover of Jean Sibelius s 'Finlandia Hymn'.
    Vaughan Williams was a big inspiration for the pastoral side of British bands like Genesis and The Enid.
    Bach might be Number One for citations 'Whiter Shade Of Pale, from memory the Italian band Latte E Miele .
    Last edited by alucard; 03-18-2017 at 02:09 PM.

  9. #9
    Man of repute progmatist's Avatar
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    Focus' Hamburger Concerto is based on Haydn's Chorale San Antoni Divertimento in B flat-movement II...The same theme Brahms used for his Variations on a theme by Haydn.

    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"--Dalai Lama

  10. #10
    Bach, Whiter Shade of Pale...

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    Focus' Hamburger Concerto is based on Haydn's Chorale San Antoni Divertimento in B flat-movement II...The same theme Brahms used for his Variations on a theme by Haydn.

    Another of Focus' pieces is based on themes from Bartok's Concerto for Orchestra - can't remember which one maybe Eruption.

  12. #12
    Bach's 'Little Fugue in G' at 1:07 introduces Styx's "Father O.S.A." at 7:08, so progressive.


    O.S.A. stands for Order of St. Augustine.

  13. #13
    Member helicase's Avatar
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    My favourite, Canarios - Ciclos (Vivaldi's Four Seasons):


    Stravinsky's Sacre seems popular. I've also got jazz versions by Alice Coltrane and the Brazilian band Projeto B.

    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    Focus' Hamburger Concerto is based on Haydn's Chorale San Antoni Divertimento in B flat-movement II...The same theme Brahms used for his Variations on a theme by Haydn.
    And there's not only classical music in there, but also a bit of classic Dutch literature. Thijs van Leer recites a few lines from the 17th century play Gysbreght van Aemstel by Joost van den Vondel.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Kavus Torabi View Post
    My favourIte is when a riff from The Rite Of Spring appears in Voivod's Pre-Ignition.
    The song is already mind blowing before it shows up.
    Afterwards....wowee.
    There's a couple Le Sacre Du Printemps allusions in Zappa's catalog, actually probably more than a couple. The middle of Drowning Witch makes use of the "mad dance" rhythm, and on the Guitar album, the track Inna-Gada-Stravinksy, gets it's title from Frank quoting the bassoon part from the beginning of the Stravinksy, whilst Scott Thunes (I think it's Thunes) is playing the Inna-Gada-Da-Vida riff.

  15. #15
    I recently posted Fruupp’s non-album concert fave “On a Clear Day” to another thread, which features a bit of Holst’s “Jupiter” in there. The “Jupiter” theme also opens and closes Morgan’s “Nova Solis” suite (which also features the entirety of “Earth,” the song singer Tim Staffell brought with him from his previous band, Smile, who went on to become Queen).
    Confirmed Bachelors: the dramedy hit of 1883...

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    Quote Originally Posted by progmatist View Post
    Focus' Hamburger Concerto is based on Haydn's Chorale San Antoni Divertimento in B flat-movement II...The same theme Brahms used for his Variations on a theme by Haydn.

    Johannes Brahms was also born in Hamburg Germany which is of course how they came up with the name Hamburger Concerto as a play on words. Clever


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  17. #17
    ELP's The Barbarian based on Bartok's Allegro Barbaro

    Jethro Tull - Bouree

  18. #18
    Janell Duxbury has literally written the book (and two supplements) on this topic.

    Rockin' the Classics and Classicizin' the Rock: A Selectively Annotated Discography (Discographies: Association for Recorded Sound Collections Discographic Reference) by Janell R. Duxbury (1985-04-25)

    https://www.amazon.com/Rockin-Classi...janell+duxbury

  19. #19
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    Area: Il Massacro di Brandeburgo Numero Tre in Sol Maggiore


  20. #20
    Member chalkpie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGeek View Post
    There's a couple Le Sacre Du Printemps allusions in Zappa's catalog, actually probably more than a couple. The middle of Drowning Witch makes use of the "mad dance" rhythm, and on the Guitar album, the track Inna-Gada-Stravinksy, gets it's title from Frank quoting the bassoon part from the beginning of the Stravinksy, whilst Scott Thunes (I think it's Thunes) is playing the Inna-Gada-Da-Vida riff.
    Call any Vegetable as well.

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by chalkpie View Post
    Call any Vegetable as well.
    Yeah, there's an excerpt from Holst's Jupiter there.

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    Status Back Baby....Petrouchka again

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Zeuhlmate View Post
    Ligeti comes to mind

    ELP - debatable if its a specific track, but to me it immidiately made me think "The Three Fates" or "Trilogy" (middle section).

    http://playlistasartform.com/playlis...icades/ligeti/

    "As to the two elements of title, you wouldn’t say the result is obviously Hungarian, though some YouTubers have imagined it sounds a little prog in places. A coincidence, presumably; Ligeti was eclectic, but I doubt his tastes extended to Emerson, Lake and Palmer."

    ...

    "On YouTube there is even a version of Hungarian Rock for barrel organ, though I’m not sure where it leaves us except perhaps closer to ELP than before."

    ------


  24. #24
    Ya know, it's funny that there are people drawing comparisons between Ligeti and ELP, because the first time I heard the Mechanical Music disc in Sony's Ligeti Edition series from the late 90's, I thought some of the barrel organ recordings reminded me of Keith Emerson. I also remember being chastised on the old AOL classical music board for making that suggestion (they didn't like any suggestion that there was any serious link between rock or pop music of any kind of classical or jazz).

    I think it's more likely that Keith would have listened to György, rather than the other way around, ie it's Keith's music that sounds like György. I don't know how common recordings of Ligeti's piano music (which is basically what we're talking about here) was in the late 60's or early 70's, but we know Keith was listening to 20th century composers like Ginastera, Copland, and Rodrigo, so it's feasible that he would have heard Ligeti if such opportunity had been afforded to him.

  25. #25
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    ^^^ Hungarian rock seems to be composed in 78 (I thought the music was older), so the resemblance is most likely a coincidence.

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