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Thread: The Beatles' Thread

  1. #51
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Toad View Post
    Was it The Beatles who started the long hair thing or did they give it world wide attention and then everyone jumped on board?
    They legitimized it.

  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Toad View Post
    I noticed someone mentioned the long hair look on Rubber Soul. So I'm thinking "Was it The Beatles who started the long hair thing or did they give it world wide attention and then everyone jumped on board?"

    Whatcha think?
    They picked up the haircuts from their time spent in Germany. So, no, they didn't begin it, but they certainly popularized it. That was also one of the things that bugged them about Pete Best. He didn't adopt the look.

    Quote Originally Posted by Enid View Post
    With The Beatles felt like a bunch of young British guys doing their own interpretation of American Rock N'Roll with some original songs of their own. There were no singles on the album and it contained some kind of stripped down....down to earth...vibe sensed throughout the album. It was actually cool because it didn't contain hit singles ...but instead revealed a different side to The Beatles that many American kids in "64/'65 were not in touch with. When Meet The Beatles came out in the U.S. it had more of a marketing process behind it by adding a single and altering tracks ..minus some from With The Beatles. So IMO...I don't believe that many Americans realized The Beatles wanted that album to sound different unless they bought the British import. Then the on going subdivisions labels shifting Beatle records around. I recall having Beatles records on the Swan label, Tollie Records and Vee Jay. The Beatles vs The Four Seasons ...very silly marketing concepts
    All good points. WTB is still one of my favorites. Most of it still sounds fresh to my ears.
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  3. #53
    Having been born in 1960, I got my dose of Beatles from Ed Sullivan from 1964 onward (funny thing, my parents actually liked watching The Beatles on Ed's show, when they didn't really care for rock at all - Ed Sullivan somehow legitimized them), and The Beatles cartoons (and I remember them playing "Tomorrow Never Knows" and other songs quite questionable for younger viewers).
    "And your little sister's immaculate virginity wings away on the bony shoulders of a young horse named George who stole surreptitiously into her geography revision."

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  4. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Taped Rugs View Post
    I'm a newer PE member, but from what I've read over the last month, I'm assuming a large percentage of PE PEople are musicians and/or recording artists (including a good dose of non-commercial home-recording artists). Anyone got any Beatles covers they'd like to share for a late-night Northern California community radio show (the more unusual the interpretation, the better for this show)? If I get an hour's worth, the show will go on.
    I did a version of Something for 2 pianos.

  5. #55
    Member Digital_Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    They legitimized it.
    According to one of my old professors in college it was the surfer guys on the west coast in the early sixties who started it.

  6. #56
    Quote Originally Posted by Digital_Man View Post
    According to one of my old professors in college it was the surfer guys on the west coast in the early sixties who started it.
    Others would argue it was some guy named Elvis appearing on Sullivan. Then there was a Buddy Holly guy I recall.
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  7. #57
    Quote Originally Posted by Rarebird View Post
    I did a version of Something for 2 pianos.
    Sounds unique indeed. You wanna share it with my listeners, Bird? If so, please send me a link, thanks!

  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by Taped Rugs View Post
    Sounds unique indeed. You wanna share it with my listeners, Bird? If so, please send me a link, thanks!
    I only have it on a cassette-tape.

  9. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by Enid View Post
    I remember the week Rubber Soul was released. Kids were bringing the album to school to play it in music class. Most adults reacted with shock when they saw the cover and the newly founded extended hair length of The Beatles. It was such an Americanized reaction based on being conditioned from their upbringing. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure that the vastness of that mentality existed. Especially when Beatles were asked if they were going to get a haircut. Before The Beatles we had Moe Howard and I'm not sure if his hair style was accepted ?
    The media's obsession with the Beatles' hairstyles is baffling. Not just the US side of the pond - in the UK as well.

  10. #60
    Member Jerjo's Avatar
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    I'm playing Revolver again today, third time this week. I may require intervention.
    I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

  11. #61
    Member Digital_Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronmac View Post
    Others would argue it was some guy named Elvis appearing on Sullivan. Then there was a Buddy Holly guy I recall.
    Well, my teacher was referring to shoulder length hair I believe.

    Some guy named Elvis and a Buddy Holly guy. You crack me up.

  12. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by Digital_Man View Post
    Well, my teacher was referring to shoulder length hair I believe.

    Some guy named Elvis and a Buddy Holly guy. You crack me up.
    Oh, I misunderstood. I get it.
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  13. #63
    Member Digital_Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronmac View Post
    Oh, I misunderstood. I get it.
    Yeah, because he was comparing them to hippies saying the surfer dudes came first. Then again this was the same teacher(the class was Juvenile Deliquency) who used the term "metal bangers" when I'm pretty sure he meant "metal heads."

  14. #64
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Digital_Man View Post
    According to one of my old professors in college it was the surfer guys on the west coast in the early sixties who started it.
    He (or she?) is wrong. Many beatniks in the late 1950s were known for shoulder length hair, whereas the surf culture (which started in the early 1960s) mostly favored shorter cuts because long hair is impractical in the salt water. Long hair went mainstream with the British Invasion in 1964.

  15. #65
    Member Digital_Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    He (or she?) is wrong. Many beatniks in the late 1950s were known for shoulder length hair, whereas the surf culture (which started in the early 1960s) mostly favored shorter cuts because long hair is impractical in the salt water. Long hair went mainstream with the British Invasion in 1964.
    Yeah, I had a feeling he didn't really know what he was talking about. Maybe the surfers had hair that was as long as the Beatle's haircuts in the mid sixties but not shoulder length. Thanks for clarifying that.

  16. #66
    Dave Davies had shoulder length hair in '64 /'65 when Brian Jones, The Beatles, and the DC5 were just below the ear. I also recall the overall reaction to the length of The Beatles hair on Rubber Soul....as I'm not baffled as to why but certain several bands had shoulder length hair during that period. I just have to think on it.


    The year Magical Mystery Tour was released my childhood mate brought the album into music class and requested for the teacher to play it. At first I didn't understand what was going on with their change in sound. I was about 12 years old and had some exposure to Psychedelic Rock ...but surely not enough dosage to have a clear understanding.


    Many kids cringed at the style. They complained about the songs. They were so hooked on Beatlemania, that they actually hated the Beatles new style. My friend look very sad and I told her that it took my parents until 1967 to start requesting "Yesterday", " Every Little Thing" , and ""She Loves You". I told her not to worry over grief because the kids are going to take drugs in a few years and then they'll like it.

    For at least a decade it took different generations of people years to catch up with The Beatles. Mainly due to their personal upbringing and the inner turmoil created within themselves when accepting some of John Lennon's lyricism. They couldn't completely turn their back on it because it contained melodies that existed in practically everyone's head and so over time and due to popular demand, The Beatles managed to persuade a good percentage of people who disliked them at first, but witnessed the abundance of demand for The Beatles through their family members and friends. Eventually these people did find something they liked about Beatles music ...even though it had been suppressed by a religious background, a military background, where wild Rock music was forbidden. The Beatles were able to lure in anybody and they expanded while doing that over time. Eventually many people in either common or bizarre social environments grew to love The Beatles.

  17. #67
    Progga mogrooves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enid View Post
    Dave Davies had shoulder length hair in '64 /'65.
    The real hairies were the Pretty Things and the Hullabaloos.
    Michael: "Harold, don't you have any other music, you know, from [last] century?"
    Harold: "There is no other music....."

  18. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by Enid View Post
    The year Magical Mystery Tour was released my childhood mate brought the album into music class and requested for the teacher to play it. At first I didn't understand what was going on with their change in sound. I was about 12 years old and had some exposure to Psychedelic Rock ...but surely not enough dosage to have a clear understanding.


    Many kids cringed at the style. They complained about the songs. They were so hooked on Beatlemania, that they actually hated the Beatles new style.
    Like these kids?



    Except the last one. There are longer clips from that show, where they play SFF and PL and Dick Clark clearly doesn't get it and disapproves afterward while egging the kids on. It's actually quite embarrassing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Enid View Post
    For at least a decade it took different generations of people years to catch up with The Beatles.
    Quite. Many of our parents ended up with early Beatle haircuts and never even realized it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Enid View Post
    They couldn't completely turn their back on it because it contained melodies that existed in practically everyone's head and so over time and due to popular demand, The Beatles managed to persuade a good percentage of people who disliked them at first, but witnessed the abundance of demand for The Beatles through their family members and friends. Eventually these people did find something they liked about Beatles music ...
    My old man ALWAYS listened to Muzak. (Where's that barfing icon when you need it?) I actually first knew a lot of Beatles songs from the Muzak versions, regretfully. I would eventually begin to buy albums and realize I knew more of songs than I thought. Believe me, this is difficult to confess, being a die-hard fan.

    I recall years later when I was listening to The White Album at home. (This was later when I was in my early 20s and back home after art school.) The final track, "Goodnight," came on and my mother, overhearing it, refused to admit that John Lennon wrote that song. "That's an old lullaby!" she'd insist. She just wouldn't believe it.

    Silly story, but it makes me chuckle.
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  19. #69
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mogrooves View Post
    The real hairies were the Pretty Things and the Hullabaloos.


  20. #70
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    There's a very early, pre-fame, mid 60s clip of Bowie sporting long blonde hair...not dissimilar to the guy in the Hullabaloos!

  21. #71
    In '66 at age ten I had all the American albums and singles to date. Around this time came a news flash about John Lennon saying that The Beatles were more popular than Christ. All my friends parents hit the ceiling and they weren't allowed to listen to The Beatles. My parents were understanding of the situation most likely due to being musicians so I kept my Beatles records and listened whenever I wanted. Being a kid and having your Beatles records taken away was devastating. I recall this being a genuine uproar of an incident. A huge offensive stink bomb in the faces of people who expressed anger and disappointment to exceed measures to be taken against The Beatles for influencing the youth.

    Parents and school staff were very concerned about the Christ statement influencing the youth. In 1966 people took a statement like that to heart and fought against it unlike today where the notion to get offended by something like that feels ridiculously ridiculous to a more vast quantity of humans. So I thought?? Until I taught in a music school during the mid 2000's. My position mainly focused on preparing students for their music recitals. It was made clear to me by the parents to never teach their children a Beatles song. I could not get a grip on this concept because my mind works differently and understands that when a child or teenager learns a Beatle song...it is the perfect introduction to melody. Eventually I approached the owner of the school and he then explained that parents were still offended by the Christ statement in '66 and that Beatles music was forbidden. At first I was offended. I had about 20 students during that time and The Beatles were forbidden? This reminded me of a "Twilight Zone" episode.

  22. #72
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JJ88 View Post
    There's a very early, pre-fame, mid 60s clip of Bowie sporting long blonde hair...not dissimilar to the guy in the Hullabaloos!

  23. #73
    Member Emeritus (A.M.P.) rcarlberg's Avatar
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    Enid, are you in the Deep South of the USA? Fairly or unfairly I associate that sort of bone headedness with that region, which consistently falls in the bottom of scholastic achievement and the top of teenage pregnancy.

  24. #74
    Yikes!

  25. #75
    Quote Originally Posted by rcarlberg View Post
    Enid, are you in the Deep South of the USA? Fairly or unfairly I associate that sort of bone headedness with that region, which consistently falls in the bottom of scholastic achievement and the top of teenage pregnancy.
    No actually lol!....hahahahaha...South Jersey. Interestingly enough ...a good percentage of South Jersey people imitate people of the South. They have a Southern accent and listen to Southern Rock. The only thing missing is the Southern hospitality and the social environment seems to take on the role of a macho nasty redneck in a pick up truck. I would rather have the Southern hospitality than to deal with that. I believe the parents I dealt with in the music school were Quakers. If you didn't walk perfectly with one foot in front of the other, or if you didn't look people straight in the eye, ( which wasn't something Jimi Hendrix did),you would be judged. Ironically when my kids went to the local public school they were sent to the office for imitating The Three Stooges. I was called over to the school and asked by members of the school staff if I allowed my kids to watch the Stooges. They were devastated by the notion that I did. Some of the staff were wearing SpongeBob tee-shirts and I called them on it. They said that SpongeBob was perfectly appropriate to watch. I said...."So it's okay for my kids to make an ice cream soda out of plant leaves, ketchup, and dirt?" I moved to a place which is less strict and less judgemental. There's good and bad everywhere but I was living in extremism.

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