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Thread: Needlepoint: Outside the Screen - Norwegian jazzfusionprog at its best

  1. #26

  2. #27
    And I left at 23:25 on the nighttrain to Bergen for a fucking inheritance judicial with my bastard dad!

    Why didn't someone tell me in advance?
    "Improvisation is not an excuse for musical laziness" - Fred Frith
    "[...] things that we never dreamed of doing in Crimson or in any band that I've been in," - Tony Levin speaking of SGM

  3. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrotum Scissor View Post
    And I left at 23:25 on the nighttrain to Bergen for a fucking inheritance judicial with my bastard dad!

    Why didn't someone tell me in advance?
    There seems to be another gig in Oslo today: https://nl-nl.facebook.com/pg/needle...=page_internal

  4. #29
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    I am enjoying Aimless Mary quite a bit. First spin and like it! Do not know how to explain or to categorize, nor care to. Music, either like what is there or not. One knows if it is good or not. Thanks for the suggestion. love this place. Any more similar?

  5. #30
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    Robert Reveirei is quite good as well. Happy Happy.

  6. #31
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    Good Morning Sunday ~

    I keep a running 'list' of bands I want to check out and possibly add to my collection. Needlepoint was listened to this morning and I am very much so liking what I am experiencing. the Diary of Robert Reverie is just awesome. Thank to those here for another excellent recommendation!

    Carry On
    Chris Buckley

  7. #32
    Member Zalmoxe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by winkersnufs View Post
    Good Morning Sunday ~

    I keep a running 'list' of bands I want to check out and possibly add to my collection. Needlepoint was listened to this morning and I am very much so liking what I am experiencing. the Diary of Robert Reverie is just awesome. Thank to those here for another excellent recommendation!

    Carry On
    Chris Buckley
    Make sure you add not only the last album but "Aimless Mary", the previous one as well. After that, you can continue your journey backwards in their catalogue as many rewards will be awaiting you along the way.

  8. #33
    Member Zeuhlmate's Avatar
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    Interview with guitarist, bandleader & composer Bjørn Klakegg

    http://progressiverockcentral.com/en...d-needlepoint/

    btw - there is a new album coming up (probably in april ) with his other band. Working titles: Local store - Magpie & the man
    Different musicians, 2 guitarists, bass & drums. Its more mainstream, more song orientated but with lots of guitarsolos. If you like the least prog-psychedelic songs from Reverie, you will probably appreciate this too.

  9. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Zeuhlmate View Post
    Interview with guitarist, bandleader & composer Bjørn Klakegg

    http://progressiverockcentral.com/en...d-needlepoint/

    btw - there is a new album coming up (probably in april ) with his other band. Working titles: Local store - Magpie & the man
    Different musicians, 2 guitarists, bass & drums. Its more mainstream, more song orientated but with lots of guitarsolos. If you like the least prog-psychedelic songs from Reverie, you will probably appreciate this too.
    Thanks. Looks like an interview done after the previous album. I did one after the last one, which was published in a Dutch magazine, but I have the rough original version in English for you:

    INTERVIEW NEEDLEPOINT
    Who represents Robert Reverie?
    In my review I described the characters in your songs as odd figures straight from a novel of the Swedish writer Torgny Lindgren, like Norrlands Akvavit and Dorés Bibel. Where do you get your inspirations from?


    Bjørn: It is strange to talk about my text writing, cause I feel I’ve just started to do it. I had to because I started to sing..and that made my life twice as busy  But I do get inspiration from people I meet. To be honest there is only one person in that Robert-album who was in my mind from the small place in Sweden where my girlfriend and I have a house. It was a neighbour with many nice qualities but it’s strange to observe how neighboures in such a small place can end up not being friends any longer. Us he helped with a lot of practical things, and we kept the friendship till he died just before the release, but if someone hurt him there was no way back to friendship….But anyway this guy watched the same clouds as I did, heard the same sounds, so in a way I dedicated many of the texts to him. Mary was maybe a girl he was in love with at school, but I don’t think he ever got her.

    What of David Wallumrød’s qualities and equipment were you looking for when you asked him for the second Needlepoint-album Outside The Screen, the follow-up of the keyboard-less, instrumental debut The Woods Are Not What They Seem?

    Bjørn: It was Nikolai who knew him and asked him, and Nikolai knew all the qualities of that guy. David is so musical, has such beautiful sound in all his instrument, so I was truly happy when he joined the album in the end of it’s makings prosess. You know, that album started as an instrumental too. It was almost finished, when I, also in communication with Nikolai, wondered why I still made instrumental music when 99% of the music I listened to was vocal-based! So then we dug in some vocal. I had never sung for reall before, had never written a text for else than for fun-and I promise it was a scaaary thing to do. And at last we invited David into the sound-scape, and of course then we could not let him go!

    How hard is it to get and keep such much asked keyboard-player in your band (who I know especially because of his work for Beady Belle and their singer Beate S. Lech)?

    To me to keep all of these guys is a most wonderful thing. I know David enjoys being a part of our band, and Nikolai and Olaf are also musicans who are like dreams to play with…so I guess that’s the answere of that question. I have not one single time asked any of them to play this way or other. It would be completely stupid of me. Their playing always make me happy!

    Born in 1958 your musical roots lay in the seventies. How is it to put all those influences, like the Canterbury Scene (both the song-side and the instrumental side of the “genre”), guitar- and keyboard-driven jazzrock and Syd Barrett-like songs, into modern sounding compositions that are unmistakable written by Bjørn Klakegg?


    Bjørn: Thanks! My favorite band in my youth was Emerson, Lake and Palmer. Then jazz took me away from both them and other rock bands for a long long time. I never learned what Canterbury was until after Aimless Mary. Before Aimless Mary, Nikolai sendt me all the ELP albums I loved as a youth, and I ended up that Sunday morning listening to all of them, while emotions from my youth drowned me! Old girlfriends, old guitars, my boys-room, a lot of good memories showed up. I guess it did something to me. It’s a lot of references to Nikolai here, for instance, but he is so important when comes to how our band has ended up sounding.
    But when I make music I never try to copy anything. I stopped doing so after I tried to write a Zawinul-song in my early twenties  I just improvise songs into my iphone. Much of it is not worth saving. Some few out of many turns out to be songs…and very seldom i rewrite them radically. But when I visit Nikolai with these premature recordings, he always helps me picking out which songs to use, and he also tells me which parts of the songs to drop. Then, when my simple songs are finished…and some instrumental parts in between them, I lean back, and in studio Nikolai becomes the producer, and the musicians makes the songs sound much better than I could imagine.

    The latest addition to Needlepoint was Olaf Olsen, known for his work with the progressive singer-songwriter Tim Christensen. Was it your choice to let him play so fantastically virtuoso on songs that are essentially dreamy, or did he have the freedom to arrange his parts himself?

    Bjørn: As I mentioned above, these musicians just have to have a free rein! I once called Olaf a “happy propeller airplane over summerly landscape” when listening to him in our last production. I just think he had a lot of fun!! And I had no reason at all to stop him.

    Which of the other bands you’ve been in would you describe as progressive or are they all more in the modern jazz-vein?

    Bjørn: None of them! More a kind of countryish jazz maybe? I was very often called a Norwegian kind of Bill Frisell. I guess many of my old songs could easily have been sung…I just didn’t dare to at that time…

    Finally, when I’m correct with Needlepoint you’ve played only in Norway live. Now the album has been distributed well in the rest of Europe, can we expect some gigs in The Netherlands too?
    Bjørn: I really hope so! But as I have said in some other interviews: I’m a lousy booker, and we don’t have a manager…so your welcome to help me! We all want to come and visit you!

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